(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report"

72nd 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 




THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

FORM OF BEQUEST 

I give, devise, and bequeath to 
The Children's Hospital, in the City 
of Boston, and Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, incorporated in the 
year 1869, the sum of. 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

1869 



ANNUAL REPORT 
for the Year 1941 



BOSTON - MASSACHUSETTS 

MCMXLII 



OFFICERS OF THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

1942 

President Vice President 

SAMUEL H. WOLCOTT F. MURRAY FORBES 

Treasurer Secretary 

EDWARD L. BIGELOW AMORY COOLIDGE 

State Street Trust Co., Boston 

Counsel for the Corporation 
JAMES GARFIELD 

Committee on Investments 
EDWARD L. BIGELOW (Ex-officio) WILLIAM ARTHUR DUPEE 
SAMUEL H. WOLCOTT G. PEABODY GARDNER 

Executive Committee 
ALEXANDER WHEELER, Chairman 
EDWARD L. BIGELOW AMORY COOLIDGE 

ARTHUR G. ROTCH F. MURRAY FORBES 

MRS. WILLIAM E. RUSSELL SAMUEL H. WOLCOTT 

and such other members of the Board of Managers as the President may select 
from time to time, to serve for a period of approximately three months each. 

Social Service Committee 

MRS. GEORGE H. MONKS, MRS. LENDON SNEDEKER 

Chairman DR. ROBERT B. OSGOOD 

MRS. JOHN S. AMES, JR. DR. WILLIAM E. LADD 

MRS. FRANCIS B. LOTHROP DR. BRONSON CROTHERS 

G. PEABODY GARDNER DR. WILLIAM T. GREEN 

MRS. HOWARD TURNER DR. FRANK R. OBER 

MRS. AMORY THORNDIKE DR. CLEMENT A. SMITH 

Committee on the School of Nursing 
ALEXANDER WHEELER, Chairman DR. DONALD W. MacCOLLUM 
MRS. CHARLES A. NEWHALL MISS STELLA GOOSTRAY, R.N. 

MRS. GEORGE H. MONKS MISS SOPHIE NELSON 

JAMES GARFIELD BANCROFT BEATLEY, LL.D. 

Private Ward Committee 
F. MURRAY FORBES, Chairman DR. RICHARD M. SMITH 
MRS. NATHANIEL WINTHROP DR. HAROLD G. TOBEY 
DR. WILLIAM E. LADD DR. R. CANNON ELY 

DR. DONALD W. MacCOLLUM 
with such other individuals as the Committee may appoint. 

Publicity Committee 
DONALD T. CARLISLE, Chairman F. MURRAY FORBES 
JOHN C. KILEY MRS. CARL H. ERNLUND 

Budget Committee 
SAMUEL H. WOLCOTT GEORGE v. L. MEYER (Ex-ojfficio) 

ARTHUR G. ROTCH EDWARD L. BIGELOW (Ex-ojfficio) 

AMORY COOLIDGE 

2 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 

1942 

Alexander Whiteside 1914 

Samuel H. Wolcott (Ex-Officio) 1915 

George v. L. Meyer 1915 

F. Murray Forbes (Ex-Officio) 1918 

Mrs. George H. Monks 1921 

Mrs. Frederick S. Mead 1921 

Louis E. Kirstein 1921 

G. Peabody Gardner . . 1921 

William Arthur Dupee . 1922 

Pliny Jewell 1922 

Henry W. Palmer 1923 

Arthur G. Rotch 1923 

Mrs. H. Parker Whittington 1927 

Harvey H. Bundy 1927 

Louis F. S. Bader 1930 

James Garfield 1931 

**Gordon Abbott 1932 

**F. Murray Forbes, Jr 1932 

Lawrence Foster 1932 

Edward L. Bigelow (Ex-Officio) 1933 

Miss Ida C. Smith 1933 

Alexander Wheeler 1934 

Mrs. Nelson S. Bartlett 1936 

John C. Kiley 1936 

**Samuel H. Wolcott, Jr 1936 

**John S. Ames, Jr. (Ex-Officio) 1937 

**Charles Stockton 1937 

Donald T. Carlisle 1938 

Hermann F. Clarke 1939 

Mrs. William E. Russell (Ex-Officio) 1939 

John J. Burns 1940 

Amory Coolidge 1940 

**Brinley M. Hall 1941 

**With United States Armed Forces 

THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



FORMER MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS 



fAbbott, Gordon 1896-1937 

fAbbott, Jere 1871-1895 

fAmes, F. L 1886-1893 

fAmes, Oliver 1894-1920 

Ames, Mrs. F. L 1926-1929 

fBaylies, Walter C 1908-1910 

fBigelow, Alanson 1876-1884 

fBigelow, George T 1870-1877 

fBlake, Clarence J 1895-1918 

fBlake, J. A. Lowell 1911-1938 

f Bremer, S. Parker 1923-1925 

f Brooks, Phillips 1884-1885 

fBrowne, Dr. Francis H. . .1870-1915 

Caswell, Mrs. William W. . 1924-1925 

fComerford, Frank D 1935-1941 

**Coolidge, Lawrence 1936-1941 

Cox, Mrs. William C 1936-1939 

fDana, S. B 1899-1901 

Eliot, Mrs. Samuel 1934-1935 

fEmmons, Nathaniel 1870-1885 

fEmmons, Robert W., 2nd. 1903-1928 

fEndicott, William 1904-1928 

fFaulkner, Charles 1870-1885 

fFearing, Albert 1870-1875 

fFiske, Charles H 1870-1898 

fGardner, George P 1885-1939 

fGreen, Samuel A 1870-1883 

fHallowell, John W 1925-1926 

Hardwick, Huntington R. . 1930-1933 
fHerrick, Robert F., Jr. . . .1921-1925 

Hollister, Paul M 1926-1926 

fHowe, George D 1871-1880 

fHunnewell, F. W 1895-1917 

Hunnewell, F. W., 2nd . . .1915-1924 

fHunnewell, H. H 1886-1901 

flngalls, William 1870-1902 

f Johnson, Samuel 1870-1871 

fjoy, Charles H 1887-1887 

f Kuhn, W. P 1877-1880 

f Lawrence, John 1908-1914 



fLincoln, Roland C 1884-1885 

f Manning, J. M 1881-1882 

Mead, Mrs. Frederick S. . .1921-1940 

fMudge, E. R 1874-1878 

fPeabody, Oliver W 1884-1896 

fPerkins, Thomas N 1904-1916 

fPhelan, James J 1921-1934 

fPhillips, John C 1881-1883 

Phillips, William 1931-1935 

f Pickering, H. G 1879-1886 

Pickman, Dudley L., Jr. . .1916-1925 

fPierce, Wallace L 1901-1920 

fRobbins, Chandler 1870-1882 

f Rogers, Mrs. Dudley P 1928-1939 

fSargent, F. W 1918-1919 

Seabury, William H 1902-1933 

fSears, J. Montgomery .... 1883-1905 

Sears, Philip S 1916-1925 

Seymour, Robert W 1923-1925 

tShattuck, Dr. F. P 1888-1919 

fShaw, Louis A 1934-1940 

f Spaulding, J. P 1879-1896 

fStearns, Frank W 1916-1925 

fStockton, Howard 1897-1902 

fStockton, Philip 1924-1925 

Stone, Albert, Jr 1930-1933 

fStone, Dr. James A 1928-1929 

fStrong, Edward A 1870-1873 

fSturgis, Russell, Jr 1870-1871 

fThacher, George 1886-1896 

fThacher, Isaac 1870-1883 

fThayer, E. V. R 1886-1907 

fThayer, Nathaniel 1870-1883 

f Thomas, W. B 1897-1902 

Tuckerman, John A 1919-1920 

fWetherell, John G 1887-1897 

Wheeler, Henry 1898-1926 

fWinthrop, Robert C 1870-1894 

fYoung, Charles L 1884-1901 

fDeceased. 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



STAFF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

William E. Ladd, M.D Surgeon-in-Chief 

Frank R. Ober, M.D Orthopedic Surgeon-in-Chief 

Richard M. Smith, M.D. Physician-in-Chief 

S. Burt Wolbach, M.D Pathologist-in-Chief 

George v. L. Meyer Director 

Sidney Farber, M.D. . . . . . . Secretary 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

Director 
George v. L. Meyer 

Assistants to the Director 
Miss Madeline S. Gibbs, R.N. Miss Fanny C. Knapp, R.N. 

Admitting Officers Accountant 

Miss Katherine W. Nelson, R.N., Super. Chester E. Budden 

Miss Muriel J. Seff, R.N. 
Miss Edith V. Bell, R.N. Dietitian 

Mrs. Martha H. Stuart, B.S. 

Admitting Officer, 0. P. D. 
Miss Priscilla E. Hedley Housekeeper 

Mrs. Isabel Hall 

Admitting Officers, Private Ward 
Miss H. Louise Moulton, R.N. Photographer 

Miss Harriet Houghton, R.N. Ferdinand Harding 

Rate Adjuster Purchasing Agent 

Miss Ethel Preble Miss Elizabeth C. Fitzgerald 

Record Librarians 
Mrs. Daisy J. Jacobs Mrs. Elida M. Sprissler, R.R.L. 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 
(September 1941 — September 1942) 

Kenneth D. Blackfan, M.D., Physician-in-Chief (to November 29, 1941) 
James L. Gamble, M.D., Acting Physician-in-Chief (November 29, 1941 to 

June 23, 1942) 
Richard M. Smith, M.D., Physician-in-Chief (June 23, 1942) 

Visiting Physicians 
Bronson Crothers, M.D. Richard M. Smith, M.D. 

Louis K. Diamond, M.D. Harold C. Stuart, M.D. 

James L. Gamble, M.D. Edwin T. Wyman, M.D. 

Lewis W. Hill, M.D. 

Associate Visiting Physicians 
Allan M. Butler, M.D. (to Feb. 20, 1942) Charles D. May, M.D.** 
Randolph K. Byers, M.D. Clement A. Smith, M.D. 

John A. V. Davies, M.D. Philip H. Sylvester, M.D. 

R. Cannon Eley, M.D.** 

Associate Physicians 

Eliot Hubbard, Jr., M.D. Gerald N. Hoeffel, M.D. 

and Chief of Medical O.P.D. John P. Hubbard, M.D. 

Stewart H. Clifford, M.D. Dorothea May Moore, M.D. 

Henry E. Gallup, M.D. Henry N. Pratt, M.D.** 

Stanton Garfield, M.D. Abraham S. Small, M.D. 

Nathan Gorin, M.D. Sidney H. Weiner, M.D. 
Hyman Green, M.D. 

THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 5 



Assistant Physicians 

John K. Brines, M.D. Harry Schwachman, M.D. 

Albert A. Frank, M.D. Lendon Snedeker, M.D. 

Allen M. Hill, M.D. Nathan B. Talbot, M.D. (to 
Mark I. Makler, M.D. Feb. 20, 1942) 

Robert T. Moulton, M.D. William J. Turtle, M.D. 

Rose C. Munro, M.D. Lucille Williamson, M.D. 
Ralph A. Ross, M.D. (to Feb. 20, 1942) 

Resident Physicians 
Glidden L. Brooks, M.D. (to Oct. 1, 1941) 
Donald E. L. Thurston, M.D. (to Oct. 15, 1941) 
**Clifford G. Grulee, Jr., M.D. (to Jan. 20, 1942) 
**Lon C. Hall, M.D. (Jan. 1 to June 6, 1942) 
**Clifford G. Grulee, Jr., M.D. (to Jan. 20, 1942) 
**Edward C. Dyer, M.D. (Oct. 1, 1941 to Feb. 15, 1942) 
**Lon C. Hall, M.D. (Jan. 1 to June 6, 1942) 
Fred H. Allen, Jr., M.D. (to Aug. 1, 1942) 
Winthrop I. Franke, M.D. 
Charles G. Jennings, M.D. (Feb. 1, 1942— 
Edward L. Pratt, M.D. (July 1, 1942— 

House Officers 
Edward C. Dyer, M.D. (to Oct. 1, 1941) 
Charles G. Jennings, M.D. (to Feb. 1, 1942) 

**George W. Starbuck, M.D. (to Oct. 26, 1941) 
William L. Rumsey, M.D. (to January 1, 1942) 
Eugene Kaplan, M.D. (to May 1, 1942) 
Conrad M. Riley, M.D. (to July 1, 1942) 

**William W. Wallace, M.D. (to May 1, 1942) 
Edward L. Pratt, M.D. (to July 1, 1942) 
Fred C. Robbins, M.D. (Sept. 1, 1941— 
Lawrence C. Kingsland, M.D. (Nov. 1, 1941 — 

**Thomas H. Weller, M.D. (Jan. 1— May 5, 1942) 
William Berenberg, M.D. (March 1, 1942 — 
Ferdinand Haase, Jr., M.D. (April 1, 1942 — 
George G. Salmon, Jr., M.D. (July 1, 1942— 
Raymond W. Latham, M.D. (July 1, 1942 — 
Lillian A. Francis, M.D. (July 13, 1942 — 
** On leave of absence with U. S. Armed Forces. 



DEPARTMENT OF OTHOPEDIC SURGERY 
Frank R. Ober, M.D., Orthopedic Surgeon-in-Chief 

Surgeon Assistant Visiting Surgeons 

James W. Sever, M.D. William Elliston, M.D. 

Paul W. Hugenberger, M.D. 

Visiting Surgeons Meier G. Karp, M.D. 

A. H. Brewster, M.D. Miriam Katzeff, M.D. 

William T. Green, M.D. John G. Kuhns, M.D 
Robert H. Morris, M.D. 

Resident Orthopedic Surgeons Junior Assistant Surgeons 

John F, Bell, M.D. Leo J. McDermott, M.D. 

**Eugene E. Record, M.D. Charles L. Sturdevant M.D 

House Officers 
Edward E. Hildebrand, M.D. Vincent Zecchino, M.D. 

Eulyss R. Troxler, M.D. David S. Grice, M.D. 

John F. Bell, M.D. Harold F. Hilty, M.D. 

6 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 
S. Burt Wolbach, M.D., Pathologist-in-Chief 

Pathologist 
Sidney Farber, M.D. 

Residents in Pathology 
Dr. Henry W. Edmonds 
Dr. Lent C. Johnson, Jr. 



HOUSE OFFICERS 

Pathology 
Dr. Lawrence C. Kingsland 
Dr. Alfred Pope 

Surgery Medicine 

Dr. Frank Nulsen Dr. Edward L. Pratt 

Dr. H. William Scott Dr. Thomas Weller 



Orthopedic Surgery Stomatology 

Dr. Eulyss R. Troxler Dr. Maurice Dinnerman 

Dr. Robert Keiser Dr. Charles Campelia 

Dr. Vincent Zecchino 
Dr. Edward Hildebrand 



Research Appointments in Pathology 
Dr. J. LeRoy Conel, Research Associate in Pathology 
Dr. Charlotte L. Maddock, Research Fellow in Pathology 
Dr. Harry Shwachman, Research Fellow in Pathology 
Dr. Nathan Rudo, Research Fellow in Orthopedic Pathology 
Dr. Ruell A. Sloan, Research Fellow in Orthopedic Pathology 



Voluntary Assistants 
Dr. Ethel Cermak Dr. Norman DeWilde 

Dr. William Berenberg Dr. Ernest K. Landsteiner 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 
1941 

William E. Ladd, Surgeon-in-Chief 

Visiting Surgeons 

**Thomas H. Lanman, M.D. 

Franc D. Ingraham, M.D. 

(Neurosurgery ) 
**Carlyle G. Flake, M.D. 

(Otolaryngology ) 

Associate Visiting Surgeons 
George D. Cutler, M.D. 
Donald W. MacCollum, M.D. 
Robert E. Cross, M.D. 



Associate Surgeons 
**Henry W. Hudson, Jr., M.D. 
**Patrick J. Mahoney, M.D. 
**Augustus Thorndike, Jr., M.D. 



Assistant Surgeon 
*John W. Chamberlain, M.D. 



Ear, Nose and Throat Visiting 

Otolaryngologist 

Harold G. Tobey. M.D. 



Associate Orthodontist 
Edward L. Silver, D.M.D. 



Research Associate in Otolaryngology 
Lyman G. Richards, M.D. 



Stomatologist 
Paul E. Boyle, D.M.D. 



Associate Visiting Otolaryngologist 
ffCharles I. Johnson, M.D. 



Associate Stomatologists 

Paul K. Losch, D.M.D. 

David Weisberger, D.M.D. 



Associate Otolaryngologist 
Charles F. Ferguson, M.D. 



Volunteer Assistant in Stomatology 
Dr. Norman De Wilde 



Dental Orthodontist 
Harry W. Perkins, D.M.D. 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Resident Surgeons 
**Robert R. White, M.D. (Ended Aug. 1941) 
**F. Dale Wilson, M.D. (Ended Sept. 1941) 
**Charles L. Dimmler, Jr., M.D. (Ended Jan. 1942) 
**Eben Alexander, Jr., M.D. (Ended Jan. 1942) 
**Edward V. Ferguson, M.D. 

Henry Swan, M.D. 

Donald D. Matson, M.D. 
**Hannibal Hamlin, M.D. (Ended Dec. 1941) 

**On leave of absence with U. S. Armed Forces. 



Resident Otolaryngologist 
Charles A. Tucker, M.D. 



John Kneisel, Jr., M.D. 
Tague Chisholm, M.D. 
Field C. Leonard, M.D. 
Louis deS Shaffner, M.D. 
Alexander H. Bill, M.D. 
Frank E. Nulsen, M.D. 
K. Keller van Slyke, M.D. 



Surgical House Officers 

Henry W. Scott, Jr., M.D. 
Richard B. Stark, M.D. 
Charles A. Hufnagel, M.D. 
Frederic A. de Peyster, M.D. 
William G. Schock, M.D. 
James E. Lewis, M.D. 
Thomas Duncan, M.D. 



Dental House Officer 
Charles M. Campelia, D.M.D. 



SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 

Bacteriologist 
John A. V. Davies, M.D. 



Roentgenologist 
Edward B. D. Neuhauser, M.D. 



Dermatologist 

E. Lawrence Oliver, M.D. 



Associate Roentgenologist 
**L. Alexander Vance, M.D. 
George M. Wyatt, M.D. 



Assistant Dermatologist 
Austin W. Cheever, M.D. 



Volunteer Assistant in Roentgenology 
Wallace C. Miller, M.D. 



Stomatologist 

Paul E. Boyle, D.M.D. 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Ophthalmologist 

J. Herbert Waite, M.D. 



Associate Stomatologists 
Paul K. Losch, D.M.D. 
David Weisberger, D.M.D. 



Assistant Ophthalmologist 
Paul A. Chandler, M.D. 
E. B. Goodall, M.D. 
**Trygve Gunderson, M.D. 



Assistant Stomatologist 
Volunteer Assistant in Stomatology 
John C. Brown, D.M.D. 
Paul H. Gilpatrick D.M.D. 



Director oj Physical Therapeutics 
Miss Janet Merrill 



Research Associate in Psychology 
Elizabeth Lord, Ph.D. 



Director oj Paralytic Clinic 
Miss Mary E. Trainor, R.N. 



Director oj Social Service 
Miss Marion W. Hall 



Occupational Therapist 
Miss Lois Brownell 



Assistant Chemist 

Miss Janet Appleton, A.B. 



Visiting Pharmacologists 

Reid Hunt, M.D. 

Otto Krayer, M.D. 



Visiting Physiologist 
Hallowell Davis, M.D. 



Visiting Biological Chemist 
A. Baird Hastings, M.D. 



Fred R. Blumenthal, D.M.D. 
J. Lewis Bremer, M.D. 
Allan M. Butler, M.D. 
T. Duckett Jones, M.D. 



Consulting Staff 

L. M. S. Miner, M.D. 
Charles G. Mixter, M.D. 
Robert B. Osgood, M.D. 
Merrill C. Sosman, M.D. 



Albert B. Ferguson, M.D. 



**With U. S. Armed Forces. 



10 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



SCHOOL OF NURSING AND NURSING SERVICE 

Superintendent of Nurses and Principal of School of Nursing 
Stella Goostray, R.N. 



Assistant Principal of School of Nursing 
Mary E. Norcross, R.N. 

Second Assistant 
Kathryn Cheney, R.N. 

Instructors 

Emily G. Pearson, R.N. 

Elizabeth Romine, R.N. 

Medical and Isolation Services 
Ethel M. Trafton, R.N., Supervisor 
Theresa Hurley, R.N., Head Nurse 
Harriet O'Hara, R.N., Head Nurse 
Julia A. Zelek, R.N., Head Nurse 

Surgical and Throat Services 
Frances E. Leary, R.N., Supervisor 
Edith M. Ahrens, R.N., Head Nurse 
D. Louise Dickens, R.N., Head Nurse 
Kathryn R. Donovan, R.N., Head 

Nurse 
Florence R. Lanno, R.N., Head Nurse 

Orthopedic Service 

Dorothy F. Pratt, R.N., Supervisor 
Margaret Regan, R.N., Head Nurse 
Roberta Bentley, R.N., Head Nurse 

Neurological Service 

Elizabeth C. Logan, R.N., Head Nurse 

Infants' Medical Service 
Harriet B. Russell, R.N., Supervisor 
Serene Berg, R.N., Head Nurse 
Hope G. Furgin, R.N., Head Nurse 



Assistant Superintendent of Nurses at 

Night 
Mary G. Chapman, R.N. 



Night Supervisors 
Marjorie S. Lovell, R.N. 
Elizabeth F. Webster, R.N. 



Operating Room 

Edith C. Jenkins, R.N., Supervisor 
Marjorie Potter, R.N., Assistant 
Felicia Szajnar, R.N., Assistant 



Anesthetists 

B. Elaine Lank, R.N., Chief 
Sara A. Metzler, R.N. 
Ruth Hodgdon, R.N. 
Sophia Fotis, R.N. 



Out- Patient Department 

Maud Gillespie, R.N., Head Nurse and 

Instructor, Medical Clinic 
Marion G. Perkins, R.N., Assistant 

Head Nurse, Medical Clinic 
Helen C. Harding, R.N., Head Nurse, 

Orthopedic Clinic 
Dorothy E. Fitzgerald, R.N., Head 

Nurse, Surgical Clinic 



Private Ward 

Sarah J. Vickery, R.N., Supervisor 
Bettina Daniels, R.N., Head Nurse 
Verna L. Pearl, R.N., Head Nurse 
Alice Fleming, R.N., Head Nurse 



Assistant Superintendent of Nurses 
Muriel B. Vesey, R.N. 



Nurses' Infirmary 

Christine Ritchie, R.N., Head Nurse 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



11 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS 



DURING the year 1941, the Hospital treated in its wards 3,780 children, who 
made an average stay of 15 days each, or a burden of 58,000 beds with sick 
children in them (known as hospital days) for the Staff and nurses during the 
course of the year. Here 90 children could pay nothing and some 900 others 
could only pay part of the charges set by the Hospital. The maximum ward 
charge asked last year was $3.50 a day which is far less than the actual cost to 
the Hospital. 

In the Out-patient Department 14,477 individuals came in for treatment, 
with a total number of visits for the year attended to by Staff and nurses of 
64,791. Of these over 19,000 visits paid nothing and 5000 others paid less than 
the 50c per visit asked by the Hospital. 

These figures only show the bulk of the service for which the Hospital is 
called upon. They give no idea of all the intricate, scientific mechanisms which 
are needed to carry on the numberless problems brought in, nor the minute analy- 
tical processes which go into each individual case. They do not take into account 
the skill and wisdom of the doctors, the well-taught nurses, the laboratories with 
their scores of pathological, bacteriological and chemical tests and examinations, 
the never-ending research, the X-ray technique, and, co-ordinating all, the 
direction and smooth administration. 

The year started out with the staffs satisfactorily filled, but as the year 
progressed, the Army and Navy began to make their calls so that at the time of 
writing 23 doctors have gone from our four Services. Also, ten nurses have gone. 

The full replacement of these vacancies is unlikely because so many men are 
constantly being called to war service. The problem of keeping up enough 
House Officers and Internes is acute for the same reason. But readjustments are 
being made without confusion or lessened service. There are not likely to be 
fewer children to look after in 1942 than there were in 1941, and their needs are 
not likely to be simpler. This means a greater responsibility on the whole 
Hospital Staff and particularly on the Chiefs of Service. It should be said that 
they are facing the difficult situation with much personal self-sacrifice and with 
the determination that the standard of the Hospital shall not be lowered. 

Another disappointment to the Staff and to the Board of Managers, besides 
the shortage of men, has been the check to the program of progress which the 
Staff had proposed to the Managers as its conception of the aims and long- view 
development of the Hospital. 

This program, while temporarily delayed, is accepted by the Managers as 
the considered conclusions drawn by the Staff Executive Committee from their 
critical considerations of the problems of the Hospital as a whole and of their 
forecast into the future. The Staff Executive Committee is the clearing house 
for all the ideas, demands, and aspirations of each of the divisions and subdi- 
visions of the Hospital, considered in their relative importance and in the light 
of administrative expediency. Therefore, when this Committee makes recom- 
mendations to the Managers, their disposition is to carry them out if possible. 
However, the times and the drain on the resources of the community make it 
inexpedient now to try to raise capital funds. 

THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 13 



In the statement presented by the Staff, particular emphasis was placed 
on the Evolution taking place in the medical profession in its relation to its service 
in hospitals, and on the limitations of the doctors, both physical and financial, 
to the service which they can give free to hospitals. It is pointed out that no 
greater contribution can be made to the advance in the science of the care of 
children than the establishment in hospitals of men who can give their entire 
time and talents there. The only way this can be done is to provide a sufficient 
financial inducement to attract men to make a hospital career. If this possibility 
to the greater safety of children can be fully understood, it should offer to those 
planning bequests a new and special appeal. 

Of the most important recent appeals made by the Managers, the Fund for 
the William E. Ladd Chair of Child Surgery at the Harvard Medical School 
continues to grow; but slowly. The Professorship in the person of Dr. Ladd is 
in full operation and the Hospital has the distinction of being the first to obtain 
the recognition that child surgery is an art and science apart from adult surgery 
and should be taught as such. 

Another distinction to the Hospital is the recently organized Frank R. Ober 
Department of Orthopedic Research, of which we shall hear more in the future. 
The Department is named after Dr. Ober, Chief of our Orthopedic Service. 

It is particularly sad in recording these distinctions of our Staff to think of 
the untimely death of Dr. Blackfan. He was 56 years old when he died on Novem- 
ber 29, 1941, and had been Chief of our Medical Service for 18 years as well as 
Professor of Pediatrics at the Harvard Medical School and consultant of four 
hospitals. He filled a unique position in the country in the field of pediatrics 
and was a beloved figure by all his students and professional associates. 

The Managers wish to express their gratitude to Dr. James L. Gamble, 
Professor of Pediatrics at the Harvard Medical School and Visiting Physician 
to The Children's Hospital, who assumed the duties of Acting Chief of the 
Department when Dr. Blackfan became ill. 

The many Committees of the Board of Managers attached to the major 
activities of the Hospital have been extremely helpful. These Committees are 
supplemented by doctors from the active Staffs and by members of the Welfare 
Committee. They form a very direct and informative contact with the actual 
workings of the Hospital. Unfortunately for the Hospital, seven of the younger 
Managers are going out to war service and their help will be missed until we can 
look forward to their return. 

The Board of Managers takes this opportunity to express their great grati- 
tude to the workers in the Community Fund who made possible the share which 
the Hospital received from the Fund. 

The enthusiastic thanks of the Managers also go to the ladies of the Welfare 
Committee for their enterprising and unremitting labor in the second success 
of the Yankee Trading Post. Also for their many other activities and for the 
very special and modern sterilizer installed in the improved operating rooms. 

To the doctors, to the Director and his assistants, to the Superintendent and 
Principal of the School of Nursing and her nurses, and to the whole hospital 
personnel, the Managers send their neverceasing thanks for their devotion 
and loyalty. 

BOARD OF MANAGERS 



14 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



DIRECTOR'S REPORT 

THE report for the year 1941, must reluctantly be in a less optimistic vein 
than other reports of previous years. To say that the year was full of trials 
and disappointments is nothing short of an under-statement. 

By a cruel turn of fate, Kenneth D. Blackfan, our Chief of Medical Service, 
and Thomas Morgan Rotch, Professor of Pediatrics, was stricken with a serious 
illness, and his subsequent death was a very serious blow to the institution. 

The difficulties with labor became more serious as the year went on, and we 
are profoundly grateful that our department heads, who were most affected, 
faced the problem with remarkable loyalty to the hospital and with infinite 
patience and courage. 

Instead, therefore, of a year of constructive effort we find that we went 
through a period of many tribulations, over-whelmed continually with the most 
difficult of all problems to meet at any time; namely, Uncertainty. 

We had looked forward to the year 1941 with a fond hope that a good deal 
of progressive work might be done; namely, that quite a few plans which would 
improve the usefulness and the scope of the hospital might become realities. 

To be sure conditions in Europe had already obliged us to give up any 
thought of new hospital buildings, but there were various intramural schemes 
under consideration, which if consummated would not involve anything but 
minor alterations. 

One of these was to put to better use the facilities of the Isolation Building, 
making this a unit for the study of Infectious Diseases. 

With this plan went also the consolidation of the Surgical Units now scat- 
tered between Smith Ward, Ward II and Ward IV. A Metabolism Unit was 
under serious consideration. Plans for a new Amphitheatre were drawn up, for 
our Amphitheatre has serious drawbacks. Its seating capacity is small and the 
visibility from 30 per cent of its one hundred seats is practically nil, now that 
slides are used so frequently to project on a screen the subject matter of the 
lecture or discussion. 

As the months rolled by, however, our hopes were replaced one by one by 
worries and by the realization that the war — from which many had thought us 
safely isolated— was approaching nearer to our shores. 

The Declaration of War subsequent to the historic attack on Pearl Harbor 
was a stunning blow to every American. It nevertheless crystallized many con- 
jectures and obliged us to face definite facts, some of which fortunately, had been 
largely discounted. The "writing on the wall" had not been entirely ignored. 

Everyone set to with new vigor, courage and determination. Realities, no 
matter how stressing, are no more difficult to surmount than are uncertainties 
which tend to encourage procrastination. 

The year 1941, therefore, was a period of anticipation and preparedness, 
and a struggle against the forces which were complex and impairing to the 
routine administration of any Corporation. 

All the "offensive" plans of the early part of 1941 were one by one held 
up temporarily for more propitious times, and as Christmas drew near, our 
thoughts were turning to the possibilities of being bombed, to black-outs, to 
emergency relief stations, to evacuation of patients, etc. 

THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 15 



Certain facts are fairly obvious. The Great American Public, born and 
bred in an atmosphere of complacency, are going to have some illuminating 
revelations and are going to have to forego many of the luxuries, yes, many of 
the conveniences and necessities to which they have been accustomed. Hos- 
pitals are to be no exception. 

While it was apparent that such trials and tribulations as have been faced 
during 1941 are to be multiplied manifold, it is gratifying to note a grim de- 
termination to meet eventualities cheerfully, whether they be to answer the call 
to combat the enemy, or to stay at home to combat illness. 

Neither task promises to be an easy one. Both, however, have one quality 
in common — both are vital to the defense and to the future of the nation. 

Glory and praise will be to him who fulfills his job cheerfully, unselfishly 
and without thought of reward, till the battle is won. 

G. v L. MEYER, Director 



16 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



KENNETH D. BLftCKFAN 

Thomas Morgan Rotch Professor of Pediatrics, 

Physician-in-Chief of the Children's Hospial, 

Medical Director of the Infants' Hospital, 

1923 - 1941 



THE following resolution was adopted at a meeting of the faculty of the Harvard 
Medical School. This resolution gives in outline the story of Kenneth Blackfan. 
The word story is suitable. Most of us reached our stations in medicine by travel- 
ing the valley road through lush meadows of educational opportunity. His path 
lay over the hills. To follow it was adventure and required courage and great 
fidelity of purpose. 



Kenneth Blackfan began his career in medicine in the year 1905 as a country 
doctor. Eighteen years later he became Thomas Morgan Rotch Professor of 
Pediatrics, and for another eighteen years he carried his department forward with 
consummate skill and success. There is no need to recount to this faculty his 
large services to the Harvard Medical School. But in order that our admiration 
of him may be complete, the record of a continuous and hard-won education 
which brought the country practitioner to a position of high effectiveness in 
university medicine, should be before us. 

He was born and spent his boyhood in Cambridge, N. Y., a pleasantly 
situated hamlet about forty miles north of Albany. On graduating from the 
local high school he entered the Albany Medical School of Union University. 
During his third year Richard Pearce came to the school as Professor of Pathology 
and Bacteriology. Kenneth Blackfan responded to the enthusiasm of this fine 
student of disease. He begged, and won, permission to work in his laboratory 
through the following summer. A warm student-master friendship sprang up. 
This friendship determined his future course in medicine. But not immediately. 
On receiving his medical degree at the age of twenty-two, he returned to his home 
town and for the next four years drove about the countryside on the varied 
errands of a general practitioner. He always recalled those horse and buggy 
years with pleasure, and there are older citizens of that region who still delight 
in relating therapeutic triumphs of "young Doctor Ken." But there were dis- 
turbing visits to nearby Dorset, just over the line in Vermont, where Richard 
Pearce spent his summers. There he found friendly interest and encouragement 
which gradually produced the determination to find out what might lie over 
the horizon in medicine. 

So, in the year 1909, the young country doctor set out for Philadelphia with 
letters from Richard Pearce. There he was kindly received by Samuel Hamill 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



17 



and David Edsall and a place soon found for him as resident-in-charge of a 
foundling hospital. Kenneth Blackfan thereupon became a pediatrician. Two 
years later John Howland, who had accepted the Professorship of Pediatrics in 
the newly reconstructed Medical School of Washington University, offered him 
a residency. This was a very large stroke of fortune. It removed the adventurer 
from his lonely post in the foundling hospital and, after two years in St. Louis, 
placed him in the group of young pediatricians which assembled around Howland 
in Baltimore when he succeeded Von Pirquet at Johns Hopkins in the year 1912. 
Here there was a newly built hospital for infants and children, and laboratory 
equipment far beyond anything which had yet been given a clinical department 
in this country. Howland 's group used their large opportunity with enthusiasm 
and under his wise guidance the laboratories were from the outset importantly 
productive. It was the place to be in pediatrics at that time. The most beloved 
member of this group was the resident physician. No one watched work under 
way in the laboratories with a more eager interest. And he found time to partici- 
pate. By way of instance, his work with Dandy on internal hydrocephalus has 
come to deserve that lofty adjective, classic. His demonstration that dehydration 
is a much more dangerous feature of diarrhoeal disease than is the state of scidosis 
which Howland and Marriott had just discovered shifted emphasis from alkali 
therapy to fluid replacement and produced the basis of our present effective 
treatment of this chief scourge of infants. 

When Kenneth Blackfan reached the age of thirty-seven, he was still a 
resident. He had held this modest post for eleven years. But he had reached his 
goal. He knew the existing body of knowledge in his chosen field, he knew its 
frontiers and he knew where the paths of progress lay. He was a superb diagnos- 
tician and a master of detail of hospital care of patients. Behind all this, four 
years of counrtyside practice had given him resourcefulness in use of means at 
hand and an understanding of the social realities of the physician's task. He was 
in all respects qualified for the diverse duties of departmental headship. His 
first commission came in the year 1920 when he was appointed Professor of 
Pediatrics at the University of Cincinnati. There he built up his department 
and guided a large development of hospital equipment with outstanding success. 
Then in 1923 the fruits of eighteen years of education toward leadership fell 
to Harvard. 

Why did he follow this long and economically narrow path with such serene 
contentment? This question would have annoyed Kenneth Blackfan. His 
philosophy was remarkably uncomplicated. There was nothing which could be 
called ambition, and there was nothing of the "ich dein" complex about him. He 
had simply discovered a durable delight in his work. The anatomy of this delight 
did not interest him. He knew an inscrutable phenomenon when he saw one. 
His modest and conservative use of a fine mind gave his judgments a great 
validity and brought him into a high position in the councils of this school. Know- 
ing little of the art of verbiage he was not a skillful lecturer, but in the wards 
his teaching of students and of his interns was close to perfection. He used the 
treasures of his experience, not to dazzle by making the diagnosis at a glance, but 
to point out sound appraisement of obtainable evidence. 

A large cause of Kenneth Blackfan's success in leadership was his gentle 
friendliness. He always made his associates feel that they were his comrades in 
the enjoyable adventure against disease. Also he was very brave. Beginning in 
his latter Baltimore years, he suffered a series of physical afflictions which he 

!8 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



bore with an unbelievable fortitude. He was friendly and gentle and brave. The 
simplicity and the sincerity of these traits gvae him his great beauty of personality. 

Such a record produces many reflections. I will offer you only one. We see 
very clearly the power of personality in the transmission of effective idealism. 
Undoubtedly Johns Hopkins, the University of Cincinnati and Harvard owe 
their Kenneth Blackfan to Richard Pearce. He lighted a flame of inquiry which 
burned quietly but always steadily thereafter. In Baltimore there was the irre- 
sistible impact of the vibrant enthusiasm of that most companionable of chiefs, 
John Howland. In Boston, over the last of his physician years, Kenneth Blackfan, 
in his turn, gave to his students and interns, and to young investigators, an 
understanding of the joy of attempting a high use of knowledge. This is the 
purest of gifts because it is unconsciously bestowed and so has no taint of benevo- 
lence. So this story incidentally relates the process of transfer of the imperishable 
implement of progress which we call inspiration, by those who are worthy, in 
richness of character, to be its custodian. 

JAMES L. GAMBLE, M.D. 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 19 



DIRECTOR'S IN-PATIENT STATISTICAL REPORT 
The Children's Hospital 
Boston, Massachusetts 

For the year ended December 31, 1941 













Ho 


spital Days 




Pri. 


Pub. 


T. 




Pri. 


Pub. T. 


Remain Dec. 31, 1940 


50 


137 


187 


Medical 


7,091 


12,431 19,522 


Admitted 


1,968 


3,733 


5,701 


Surgical 
Orthopedic 


1,463 
666 


22,307 23,770 
13,191 13,857 


Treated 


2,018 


3,870 


5,888 


Throat 


3,941 


5,477 9,418 


Discharged 


1,988 


3,714 


5,702 


Neurological 
Isolation 


I 223 
217 


2,584 2,807 
2,201 2,418 



Remain Dec. 31, 1941 



30 



156 186 



13,601 58,191 71,792 





Admissions 


Bed Capacity 


Bed Occupancy 




Pri. Pub. T. 


Pri. Pub. E. 


Pri. 


Pub. T. 


Medical 


783 737 1,520 


10 44 54 


20 


34 54 


Surgical 


388 1,408 1,796 


10 66 76 


4 


61 65 


Orthopedic 


73 405 478 


10 47 57 


2 


36 38 


Throat 


677 879 1,556 


12 31 43 


11 


15 26 


Neurological 


34 201 235 


— 15f 15 


— 


7 7 


Isolation 


13 103 116 


— 38f 38 


— 


6 6 



1,968 3,733 5,701 



42 241 283 



37 159 196 



Discharges 

Pri. Pub. T. 

Medical 792 727 1,519 

Surgical 395 1,389 1,784 

Orthopedic 75 415 490 

Throat 676 875 1,551 

Neurological 34 199 233 

Isolation 16 109 125 



Operations 

Pri. Pub. T. 

52 21 73 

365 1,086 1,451 

84 413 497 

786 792 578 

23 205 228 



Deaths and 

Autopsies 

Pri. Pub. Total 

D. A. D. A. D. A. 

20 14 26 21 46 35 

10 4 57 43 67 47 

- - 1 1 1 1 
1 - - • - 1 - 

- - 1 - 1 - 



1,988 3,714 5,702 1,310 2,517 3,827 31 18 85 65 116 83 



Percentage of Autopsies 58% 75% 71% 



The Infants' Hospital 
Boston, Massachusetts 
For the year ended December 31, 1941 



Remain December 31, 1940 43 

Admitted 664 

Treated 707 

Discharged 664 

Remain December 31, 1941 43 



Operations 



Surgical 

Throat 

Neuro 



Bed Capacity 
Bed Occupancy 
Hospital Days 



66 Deaths 
40 Autopsies 
14,462 Percentage of Autopsies 



20 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



DIRECTOR'S STATISTICAL REPORT— OUT-PATIENT 
The Children's Hospital 
Boston, Massachusetts 

For the year ended December 31, 1941 



Clinic 

Medical 

Surgical 

Orthopedic 

Lateral Curvature. 
Infantile Paralysis . 

Throat 

Muscle Training. . 

Lamp 

Dental 









Total 


Free 


Part Rate 


Full Rate 


Visits 


5,052 


1,955 


17,378 


24,385 


3,456 


1,052 


9,403 


13,911 


2,486 


1,138 


8,217 


11,841 


550 


122 


1,652 


2,324 


4,988 


— 0— 


— 0— 


4,988 


763 


325 


2,291 


3,379 


1,407 


323 


1,672 


3,402 


— 0— 


—0— 


2 


2 


446 


1 


112 


559 



Medical 

Surgical 

Orthopedic 

Lateral Curvature. 
Infantile Paralysis. 

Throat 

Muscle Training. . 

Lamp 

Dental 



19,148 


4,916 


40,727 


64,791 








Total 


New Cases 


Transfers 


Old Cases 


Visits 


4,332 


635 


19,408 


24,375 


2,415 


646 


10,850 


13,911 


1,010 


440 


10,391 


11,841 


28 


74 


2,222 


2,324 


64 


— 0— 


4,924 


4,988 


323 


693 


2,363 


3,379 


5 


32 


3,365 


3,402 


— 0— 


— 0— 


2 


2 


— 0— 


1 


568 


569 


8,177 


2,521 


54,093 


64,791 



Emergencies 




Medical 


773 


Surgical 


1,192 


Orthopedic 


111 


Throat 


256 



Total Number of Individuals 14,477 

Daily A v. No. of New Cases 27 

Daily Av. No. of Total Cases 215 

Minor Operations 674 



2,332 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



21 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

Balance Sheet as of December 31, 1941 

ASSETS 

Current Assets: 

Cash in bank and on hand $ 87,755.99 

Accounts receivable, patients 13,750.96 

Accounts receivable, other 9,767.65 

Infants' Hospital, balance of share of 

operating costs 6,518.48 

Accrued interest and dividends 45,252.28 

Materials and supplies on hand 34,631.27 

Prepaid expenses 2,077.61 

Investment Securities : 

General fund investments $2,843,321.79 

Restricted fund investments 1,620,888.17, 



Other Investment Property: 

Real estate $ 458,750.00 

Mortgage receivable 58,400.00 



Plant and Equipment: 

Land $ 211,128.03 

Hospital buildings 1,813,332.35 

Dormitory property 883,116.19 

Furniture, equipment and improvements 

(depreciated value) 42,626.74 



$ 199,754.24 



4,464,209.96 



517,150.00 



2,950,203.31 



Total Assets $8,131,317.51 



LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL 

Liabilities: 

Accounts payable (current bills) $ 16,814.12 

Credit balances, accounts receivable 1,065.30 

School of Nursing, tuitions unearned 3,666.20 



Capital: 

General fund $6,459,906.51 

Restricted investment funds 1,623,395.06 

Temporary special funds 26,470.32 



$ 21,545.62 



8,109,771.89 



Total Liabilities and Capital $8,131,317.51 



STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSE 

For the Year 1941 
Income: 

Hospital revenue $323,294.15 

Income from investments 214,581.95 

Donations and subscriptions 77,288.45 

22 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Subscriptions through Welfare Committee 

(net) 8,858.27 

Miscellaneous Income 17,349.39 



Total Income $641,372.21 

Expenses: 

Operation of Hospital $654,281.57 

Taxes 79.20 

Publicity 778.14 

Treasurer's office (financial matters) 4,995.50 

Miscellaneous 3,064.80 

Total Expenses 663,199.21 

Operating Deficit $21,827.00 



LEGACIES AND GIFTS FOR INVESTMENT 
Received during 1941 

FOR GENERAL FUND 

LEGACIES 

Estate of 

Bemis Library Trust (add'l) $ 25,000.00 

Clara H. Briggs 12,512.25 

Eugenie Stafford Brown, "The Stafford Leighton Brown Fund" . . 87,686.47 

Helen Dana (add'l) 1,250.00 

Charles W. Dennis 4,853.35 

Lucy H. Eaton (add'l) 350.00 

Frederick L. Ellis (add'l) 7,939.65 

Alfred F. Haines 7,000.00 

Mildred Johnson (add'l) 400.00 

Lizzie W. Lincoln 4,030.76 

Agnes M. Lindsay (add'l) 500.00 

William McKenney 5,000.00 

Clara Fearing Pierce 933.33 

Nellie M. Seavey (add'l) 200.00 



$157,655.81 

FOR RESTRICTED INVESTMENT FUND 
Estate of 

Mary Ida Converse $15,063.30 

Kate S. Gunn 5,601.75 

Clara N. Marshall (add'l) 2,500.00 

William G. Moseley (add'l) 40.00 

$23,205.05 



OTHER SPECIAL PURPOSE GIFTS 1941 

Previous Dec. 1, 1941 

Unexpended Received Expended Unexpended 

Balance 1941 1941 Balance 

Angiocardiography Fund $ 128.50 $ $ 43.50 $ 85.00 

Apparatus (special) Neurolog- 
ical Dept 186.52 22.50 164.02 

Boston Council of Social Agen- 
cies— Medical Relief Fund . . 40.66 116.92 141.90 15.68 

THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 23 



Children's Hospital Alumni As- 
sociation — Research Fund In- 
come Account 

Committee of the Permanent 

Charity Fund 82.19 

Conservation Fund 

Dental Research Fund 107.93 

Dickens' Fellowship Fund .... 99.23 

Earhart Foundation Fund. . . . 1,046.65 

Harwood, Mary Louise Fund . 14.18 
Infantile Paralysis President's 

Birthday Ball 563.84 

Ladd, William E., Chair of 

Child Surgery 

Legg Memorial Fund 500.00 

Library Fund 757.83 

Occupational Therapy Fund. . 54.00 

Orthodontia Equipment Fund. 63.66 

Orthopedic Department Fund. 50.00 
Orthopedic Infantile Research 

Fund 3,336.65 

Pathology Fund 685.35 

Physiotherapy Fund 50.00 

Pierce, Henrietta M. Pleasure 

Fund 364.94 

Pleasure Fund 41.04 

Prouty, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis I. 

Gift 11,250.00 

Research in Children's Surgery 

Godfrey M. Hyams Fund .. . 3,271.53 
Rollins, Adelaide H. Splint 

Fund 91.90 

Shuman Clothing Fund 12.52 

Katharine E. Silsbee Fund for 

Splints 153.98 

Social Service Sundries 27.90 

Solby, Esther Andrews Taxi 

Fund 47.46 

Special Nursing Fund 31.50 

Studies on Renal Calculae in 

Poliomylitis with Paralysis . . 

Ultra Violet Ray Study 

Weeks, Nelson E. Fund 

Wheel Chair Fund 3.15 

Zonta Club for Occupational 

Therapy 30.72 

Totals $23,093.83 

Income of Funds Added to Principal of Said Funds 
In Accordance with Wording of Deed of Gift 

Charles Tidd Baker Fund $ 338.00 

Horace A. Latimer Fund 898.24 

Esther Andrews Solby Fund $264.38 

(Income and portion of principal transferred to 
temporary fund for cost of transportation of 

patients) 300.00 

—35.62 

Elizabeth C. Ware 327.92 



600.00 
7.85 


682.19 


lU».!«t 


7.85 

107.93 

137.43 

989.25 

14.18 




40.00 

6,125.00 

395.01 


1.80 

6,182.40 

395.01 


3.15 


1.94 


565.05 


1,487.30 

2,500.00 

231.90 


499.96 

2,986.60 

523.58 


987.34 
13.40 

466.15 

54.00 

1,063.66 

47.15 


1,000.00 




2.85 




4,250.00 
246.60 


4,603.18 

914.73 

50.00 

298.44 
35.00 


2,983.47 
17.22 


215.55 
32.00 


282.05 
38.04 






11,250.00 






5,000.00 


4,746.96 


3,524.57 


46.42 
43.11 




138.32 
55.63 






1,077.75 
319.50 


595.10 
283.00 


636.63 
64.40 


300.00 


250.89 
31.50 


96.57 


2,050.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 


2,050.00 
492.00 


508.00 

1,000.00 

3.15 

214.50 




197.17 


13.39 


$28,395.17 


$25,018.68 


$26,470.32 



$1,528.54 



24 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



GIFTS TOWARDS CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL DAYS 

A DONATION of $1000 carries with it the privilege of dedicating the services 
of the whole Hospital for one day. 

A donation of $100 gives the same privilege for one Ward for one day. 
Inscription Donor 

December 23d 
The service of this Ward is given MRS. ARTHUR T. BRADLEE 

in loving memory of 
ARTHUR T. BRADLEE 

January 1st 
The service of this Ward is given MRS. F. B. CROWNINSHIELD 

in loving memory of 
A. F. R. 

October 4th 
The service of this Ward is given ANONYMOUS 

in loving memory of 
DR. HENRY JACKSON 

DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS 

THE HOSPITAL is deeply and sincerely indebted to the 1298 individuals and 
294 organizations and clubs who contributed $87,547.24 towards the running 
expenses in 1941, some making their contributions direct to this Hospital and 
many kindly designating for the benefit of this Hospital whole or part of their 
contributions to the Greater Boston United War Fund of which this Hospital 
is one of the participating charities. 

RESTRICTED INVESTMENT FUNDS 
1869 to December 31, 1941 

Charles Tidd Baker $ 16,019.13 

Ida Chase Baker 60,000.00 

Ann Barnet 5,000.00 

Alanson Bigelow 5,000.00 

Helen Sewell Briggs 63,889.13 

Laura A. Brown 9,957.05 

The Children's Hospital Alumni Association Research 5,100.36 

Helen Coburn 49,900.50 

Costello G. Converse 25,000.00 

Mary A. Coombs 1 7,844.04 

Marian Frances and Sarah Winter Coppenhagen 5,000.00 

Susie Dodge Crawford 5,000.00 

Harriet Otis Cruft 20,000.00 

Lilla Sargent Cunningham 5,000.00 

Clara S. Davis 25,000.00 

Caroline T. Downes 51,314.00 

Charles H. Draper 23,934.12 

Eliza J. Bell Draper 1,000.00 

Eugene F. Farnham 5,104.00 

Temple R. Fay 69,532.50 

Marjorie Forbes 5,000.00 

Thomas A. Forsyth 2,000.00 

THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 25 



Amelia Greenbaum 48,175.97 

Alexander Gunn Endowment 5,601.75 

Robert Millholland Hanna, Jr 5,000.00 

Henry C. Haven 5,000.00 

Charles Hayden Foundation 3,000.00 

William H. Hervey 11,821.97 

William Hilton 10,000.00 

Mary S. Holbrook 15,465.42 

Charles W. Holzer 41,666.67 

George S. Hyde 8,625.88 

Henry Clay Jackson 35,000.00 

Charles P. Jaynes 11,447.00 

Mrs. Jerome Jones 9,935.95 

John D. W. Joy 5,000.00 

Claude L. Kettle 5,000.00 

Kate Andrea Knowlton 2,245.00 

William E. Ladd Chair of Pediatric Surgery 44,334.78 

Horace A. Latimer 42,570.11 

Madeleine Lee, In memory of 5,000.00 

Joseph W. Leighton 12,000.00 

Maria D. Lockwood Trust 5,109.27 

Clara N. Marshall 5,000.00 

Mrs. Edythe Marshall 2,250.00 

James C. Melvin 49,251.25 

James C. Melvin, Jr 5,000.00 

Margaret A. and John Merriam 6,000.00 

Alice Appleton Meyer 1,500.00 

Kate M. Morse 15,000.00 

Mary E. Moseley 4,290.00 

Albert H. and Margaret Ann Munsell l 21,105.32 

Frank R. Ober Research 5,035.93 

Albert N. Parlin 50,000.00 

Georgie T. Patten 19,699.57 

Amy Peabody 50,000.00 

Henry G. Pickering 4,969.56 

Henrietta M. Pierce 5,000.00 

Grace Winthrop Rives, in memory of 50,000.00 

Adelaid H. Rollins, Splint Fund 1,079.11 

Frank Davison Rust, Memorial No. 1 6,200.00 

Frank Davison Rust, Memorial No. 2 4,000.00 

Sarah Gardner Sears 5,000.00 

Elizabeth G. Shepard : 3,100.00 

A. Shuman, Clothing Fund 1,000.00 

Katharine E. Silsbee 25,000.00 

Esther Andrew Solby 6,097.08 

Harriet W. Taber 2,584.48 

Helen Hallett Thompson 11,276.49 

John Parker Townsend 3,000.00 

Elizabeth G. Ware 30,754.54 

Elizabeth White 100,000.00 

Mabel Wilbur 5,000.00 

Edwin A. Wyeth 50,000.00 

Charles Loring Young 5,000.00 

Unnamed restricted funds 262,607.13 

Total $1,623,395.06 



26 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



GIFTS TO ESTABLISH MEMORIALS 
Endowed Beds 

BY vote of the Board of Managers, and until further action by the Board, a 
gift of $25,000 will endow a bed. 

MEMORIALS 
FOLLOWING a recommendation of the Staff, the Managers decided to remove 
all memorial tablets from the walls of the wards, and place them in the future 
on a panel over the nurses' station of each ward, or elsewhere, and, accordingly, 
it was voted that in the future a donor of not less than $1000 has a right to place 
a memorial for a five-year period on the memorial panel. 

One Memorial 

Lotta M. Crabtree Bed 

From the Trustees, Lotta M. Crabtree Estate 

One Memorial 
Katherine C. Stoneman Bed 

"In memory of my beloved Mother, Mary O. H. Stoneman" 
A complete list of memorials follows: 

MEMORIALS 
To December 31, 1941 



WARD 1, LOWER A 

Prouty Ward 

In memory of Anne and Olivia Prouty, 1917-1921 

WARD 1, LOWER B 

Henry Augustus Turner Memorial Bed In Loving Memory of Ruth Faxon 

Mabel C., Chester, Brookline, Mass. In Loving Memory of Wallace L. Pierce 

She filled her niche, laughed often In Memory of Sullivan Amory, Febru- 

and loved much. 1865-1921 ar y 22 > 1878— May 5, 1881 

Donated by Caroline Shapera. In lov- %^« TT April" ll" 

ing memory of her son, H. Clarence Aoril 8 1925 

Shapera, Quebec, Canada, 1881-1891 James He ' nry wmiams> i 843 _ 19 08 

In memory of Charles Henry Peirce Harriett M. Lothrop 

Abigail M. Curran, 1924 Presented by the Massachusetts Chil- 

Ellen L. Doe dren of the American Revolution in 

^ . j o „ „ ,-, Memory of their National Founder 

Gertrude Gouverneur Hunnewell. Born In Loyin y Memory> Robert p earce 

February 3, 1862. Dxed March 15, Williams, Aet. 13 years, 1907 

Annie Louise Richards Bed 

George F. Kimball Cot In Memory of Mrs. Ida Chase Baker, 

Francis Welles Hunnewell. Born No- Benefactress of this Institution 

vember 3, 1838. Died September 30, Robert Louis Stevenson 

1917. President of The Children's Carrie Elizabeth Tyler, 1883-1885 

Hospital ,1901-1917 (Sun Parlor ) 

THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 27 



WARD 1, UPPER 



Maria Frances Coppenhagen 
Sarah Winter Coppenhagen 
Florence Dean Curtis 
Jessie Preston Draper 
Margaret Constance Ellis 
In Loving Memory of 

Alice M. C. Matthews 
Susan Wells Preston 
Sara P. Lowell Blake 
Florence Cobb Brooks, 1912-1918 
Rosamond Freeman 
Theresa Pierce 
Bertha F. Taylor 
Harriet Elizabeth Pierce Wood 



Ellen Richards Slater 
In Loving Memory of 

Hazel Mills Angevine 
Madeleine Rich Bed 
From the Ethel Maud Clapp 

Memorial Fund 
Massachusetts State Federation 

of Women's Clubs 
Irene Wood Memorial Bed 
In Memory of Clara 
Elizabeth G. Shepard 
Maria P. Bowen Memorial Bed 
In Memory of Hope Clement, 1875- 

1899 (Sun Parlor) 



IDA C. SMITH WARD 
MEMORIAL CUBICLES 



In Memory of Robert C. Morse 

In Memory of Alice Mary Longfellow, 

1850-1928 
Gift of Gloria Grant Brown 
In Memory of Catherine A. Fairbanks 
In Loving Memory of Janet Dyas 

Shearer 
In Memory of Harriet Atherton 

Bubier Bergman 



Brookline Woman's Club — 1929 
Given in Memory of Her Father 

William H. Sands by his daughter 

Ethel 
In Loving Memory of James Woolson 

Hurlbut 
In Memory of Marie Agassiz Felton 

(2 cubicles) 



MEMORIAL ROOM 
In Loving Memory Mary Pauline DuPont 



WARD 2 



In Tender Memory of Lois Dorman 

Russell, a Beloved Little Child 
Abigaill P. Banchor 
Boston Section Council of Jewish 

Women 
Women of Somerville, 1922 
Donated by The Ladies' Dog Club, 

1924 
Gift of Dorchester Club Women, 1921 
In Loving Memory of Ralph Hudson 

Crocker, 1916 
In Memory of Kate Lucy Walsh, 

Benefactress of this Hospital 
In Loving Memory of Gail Gorham 

Whitcomb, May 2, 1920 
Children of Eliza James Bell Draper 
Cora Belle Towle Room, 

K. T. A., E. A., G. A. (Sun Porch) 
In Memory of Adelaide Augusta 

Thomas 
Clara S. Davis Memorial Bed 
In Memory of My Beloved Mother 

Mary O. N. Stoneman 



Charles A. Chapman 

In Memory of Annie T. Auerbach. 
Born in Philadelphia, Pa., May 3, 
1851. Died in Brookline, Mass., 
August 1, 1916 

Ruth E. Martin 

Herbert Billings Rose. Born January 
21, 1912. Died June 26, 1917. Aged 
5 years, 5 months and 5 days 

Carlos Wilson Bed 

Chestnut Hill, 1923 

In Memory of Willard Smith Curtis, 
1920 

The Amaranth Literary Circle 

Martha Higginson Barbour 

Gift of Dorchester Club Women, 1922 

Catherine Smith Bed. In memory of 
My Mother 

Caleb James Nichols, Maria A. 
Nichols, Eunice B. Nichols, Charles 
Nichols, Benjamin F. Nichols 



28 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



WARD 4 



Brookline Woman's Club 

Kent Pettingill 

Livingston Wadsworth 

Brookline, 1923 

In Loving Memory of Charles Dalton, 

April 18, 1905-April 2, 1910 
In Loving Memory of William Gray, 

May 2, 1906, September 22, 1909 
Donated by the Swedish Women of 

Greater Boston, 1922 
Catholic Women of Boston 
In Memory of Charlotte Lowell, 

August 23, 1918-March 5, 1927 
In Memory of 

Bessie Rochester Edwards 
Bessie Rochester Edwards 

First President Past President Par.ey 



Massachusetts Maine Daughters, 

February, 1922 
Dorothy Quincy Cot 
Rachel Tower Tarbell 
Wellesley Hills Woman's Club Bed, 1921 
Brookline Aid 
In Memory of Edward Jerome 

Hitchings 
Lotta M. Crabtree Bed 
In Loving Memory of Dorothy Win- 

throp, July 17, 1878- July 23, 1907 
Sarah Wyman Whitman — Lily Bed 
In Memory of Mary Devlin, born in 

Ireland, 1831, died in Salem, 1894 
In Memory of 

Bessie Porter Edwards 
Southborough Woman's Club, 1934 
In Memory of Marjorie Forbes 



WARD 5, LOWER A 

This Ward is named in memory of Elizabeth White, beloved mother of 
George Robert White, a Public Spirited Citizen of Boston, who died January 
27, 1922, and by his will, among other generous bequests for the welfare of the 
City, gave liberally towards the support of this Hospital. 



WARD 5, LOWER B 



To the Memory of Stephen Wheatland 
In Memory of Edward Ellery 

Knowlton 
In Loving Memory of 

Herman John Huidekoper 
James C. Melvin, Jr. 
Francis Skinner 

Harriet M. Billings Memorial Bed 
Charles Dickens, 1812-1870 
Albert H. Munsell 
Charles Loring Young, President of 

the Children's Hospital, 1896-1901 
Frances Adele Close 
In Memory of Mary Hutchins Taft, 

from her Son, Charles, September, 

1938 



Robert Millholland Hanna, Jr. 

In Loving Memory of Agnes Hosmer, 

November 17, 1901-August 15, 1914 
In Memory of William F. Resor 
Given in Memory of her mother, 

F. Josephine Sands, by her daughter, 

Ethel 
In Memory of John White Hallowell, 

1878-1927, Manager of this Hospital, 

1924-1927 
Mary E. Moseley 
Hattie Adele Close 
Richardson Bed in Memory of 

Frederick and Arthur Richardson 



WARD 5, UPPPER 



Julia H. Appleton Memorial Bed 
Frances Todd Baldwin 
Selina Jarvie Fletcher 
Ellen Maria Pierce 
Mary Ellen Putnam, 

July 21, 1862-May 21, 1866 
Sarah Eliza Thacher Cot 
Louise Julia Tucker, In Loving 

Memory, April 25, 1882 
Neurological Bed, 1924, donated 

through Mary E. Trainor 
Albert N. Parlin Free Bed 
A Free Bed established under the will 

of Albert Norton Parlin 



A Free Bed established under the will 

of Albert Norton Parlin 
In Loving Memory of Lothrop 

Melcher, in the interest of Neurology 
Sarah Wyman Whitman — Lily Bed 
Margaret Ann Munsell 
In Memory of Anna Goodwin Tuttle 
In Memory of Louise Shearer Butler 
In Memory of Jack Marvin 
Frank Seaver Billings Memorial Bed 
Louis Bridgman Memorial Bed 
In Very Loving Memory of 

S. Parker Bremer 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



29 



DONATIONS TOWARDS SUBSCRIPTION BEDS 

AND C. H. CLUB BEDS 

A DONATION of $100 towards a Subscription Bed or a C. H. Club Bed gives 

for one year to the donor the right to nominate one person at a time to one of 

such Beds, subject to the rules and regulations of the Hospital. 

Number 
of Beds 
Ames, Mr. and Mrs. Hobart (for use of North Easton District Nursing 

Association) 

Boston Doctors' Symphony Orchestra 

Buzzards Bay C. H. Club 

Daffodil C. H. Club 

Donald, Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm 

Duxbury C. H. Club 

Hunnewell, James M 

Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. James 

Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. George, Jr. "In memory of M. C. Cunningham". . . 

Lothrop, Mr. and Mrs. Francis B., "Cora Belle Towle Bed" 

Marblehead and Swampscott C. H. Clubs 

Saltonstall, Mrs. Robert 

Sewing Circle of 1919 

Thorp, Miss Alice A 

Warren, Mrs. Bayard 

Mason, Mrs. Charles E 

Total Number of Beds 23 



CERTIFICATE OF AUDITORS 

To the Officers and Board of Managers 

ojf THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL: 

We have made an examination of the financial accounts and records of 
The Children's Hospital for the year ended December 31, 1941. 

We have satisfied ourselves that all recorded cash receipts were deposited 
in banks and have examined cancelled checks and vouchers in support of the 
greater part of all disbursements. We have verified the balances of cash on 
hand by certificates from the bank and by actual count. 

We have inspected the securities held in the general and restricted funds 
and have seen that all transactions during the year pertaining thereto were 
properly recorded and that all collectible income therefrom was properly ac- 
counted for. The securities are generally carried at cost, or in the case of bequests, 
at market or assigned values at the date of acquisition. 

In our opinion, based upon such examination and subject to the qualification 
that securities are shown at book value which is higher than market value, the 
accompanying statements of assets and liabilities and of income and expense 
present fairly the financial condition of the Hospital at December 31, 1941, and 
the results of its operations for the year then ended, in comformity with generally 
accepted accounting principles applied on a basis consistent with that of the 
preceding year. 

(Signed) CHARLES F. RITTENHOUSE 8b CO. 

Certified Public Accountants 
Boston, Massachusetts 
February 21, 1942 

30 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SERVICE 

THE Medical Service has been without Dr. Blackfan's leadership since April, 
1941. The staff has made a devoted effort to preserve the high standards of 
patient care which he established. This effort has been successful largely because 
of the excellence of the organization which Dr. Blackfan had developed. It 
was, however, necessary for several of the senior members of the staff to take on 
duties and responsibilities in addition to their existing commitments. The chief 
burden was carried by Dr. Allan Butler with fidelity and success, but at the cost 
of nearly all of the time he had intended to devote to his endocrine researches. 
Dr. Butler has recently accepted the position of physician-in-chief of the Pediatric 
Service of the Massachusetts General Hospital and began his duties there on 
February 20th. The loss of his services both as clinician and as investigator is 
severely felt, and has made necessary a redistribution of responsibility for the 
care of patients and the teaching of students. Dr. Louis K. Diamond, Dr. 
Clement Smith and Dr. John Davies have responded generously to the challenge 
to sustain our standards by giving nearly all of their time to these duties. In 
the effort to cover the situation by co-operative endeavor, the staff has learned 
a new admiration for the skill with which Dr. Blackfan performed a large and 
intricate task. 

The demand for physicians for the armed forces will inevitably require an 
extensive reduction of staff. Already Dr. Charles May and Dr. Harry Pratt 
are serving in the Harvard Unit and Dr. Cannon Eley in the Navy. Four in- 
terns and two assistant residents have been called to active service. It is evident 
that a major problem will be the maintenance of a minimal intern and resident 
staff. In view of this clearly impending situation your Executive Committee 
has consented to acceptance of women interns. This departure from tradition 
does not imply a disadvantage to the intern service. On the contrary, the quality 
of this service will be better sustained by taking well-trained women physicians 
than by accepting men applicants whose qualifications are below our established 
standards. 

An incidental outcome of work carried out in the laboratories of the Hospital 
may be related here. Several years ago, as an approach to a study of asthma, 
the features of breathing at low atmospheric pressures were observed in a specially 
constructed chamber. The problems of high altitude flying have made these 
observations of importance. They were reported by Doctors Butler, Wilson, 
Smith, and Farber, and requests for reprints of this publication have been re- 
ceived from almost all of the research schools of aviation now being conducted 
by the Army and the Navy. 

Over the past year the output of information from investigations carried 
on in the laboratories has been extremely gratifying. Dr. May has demonstrated 
that the form of chronic malnutrition known as coeliac disease which often 
afflicts infants and young children can be rapidly cured by giving certain frac- 
tions of liver. This is a discovery of large importance. Dr. May's plan of study, 
directed towards identifying the curative substances contained in these frac- 
tions, will be carried forward during his absence. Dr. Butler brought to a success- 
ful conclusion the development of methods for the detection of ascorbic acid 
(Vitamin C) deficiencies. His methods have already been accepted as the 
standard procedures for recognition of this deficiency which is of such prominent 

THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 31 



importance in infants and children. Dr. Butler and Dr. Talbot carried consid- 
erably further their work on the appraisal of endocrine disturbances by methods 
of chemistry. Criteria for the diagnosis of adrenal hyperplasia have been better 
defined and a treament, which looks very promising, has been found for this 
hitherto incurable condition. The standards for the normal endocrine function 
of children from birth though adolescence have been further established and 
provide more accurate means for detecting early abnormalities in development. 
The use of synthetic hormones, which are now at hand, in modifying and con- 
trolling endocrine function, was a part of these studies and provided much 
information of clinical value. Dr. Harry Shwachman has carried forward the 
work on intestinal enzymes which was begun by Dr. Charlotte Maddox. His 
methods are being applied in collaboration with Dr. Sidney Farber to the study 
of pancreatic fibrosis. Dr. John Davies carried on the production of Type B 
anti-influenza rabbit serum and supervised its clinical application to the treat- 
ment of influenzal meningitis. He also studied the concentrations of the four 
different sulfonamides in blood plasma, red cells, and particularly in the white 
blood cells, in search of information regarding the relative therapeutic effective- 
ness of these drugs. On the wards his surveillance of the use of these new agents 
has been invaluable. He has repaired the disruption of the routine bacteriological 
laboratory caused by Miss Sweet's retirement and the departure of the internes 
to army service, by training a new technician personnel. 

Every service in the hospital takes care of some children with disorders of 
the nervous system. For instance infantile paralysis is treated in its active phase 
in the medical wards but prolonged after care is properly put under the ortho- 
pedic service. Many children need surgical or otological treatment. The segre- 
gation of all children with disorders of the nervous system in one ward is, therefore, 
not only unwise but also administratively impossible. However, it is necessary 
to provide special facilities if the educational implications of disease are to be 
effectively studied. For the past twelve years psychological aspects of pediatrics 
have been a major interest. Dr. Elizabeth Lord with a small but efficient staff 
has co-operated with the medical group in dealing with mental difficulties which 
arise when orderly growth and development have been impaired or interrupted 
by disease. The number of cases cared for in the special unit during the year 
was 229. The unit has been partly supported during the past year by grants 
from the Commonwealth Fund and by the Earhart Fund. The hospital has itself 
taken responsibility for the maintenance of the social service worker and for 
psychological service in the Out-Patient Department. The Neurological Service 
under the direction of Dr. Bronson Crothers thus continues to produce new and 
important information. 

The Isolation Unit opened December 1, 1940 and closed May 15, 1941. 
One hundred twenty-seven patients were admitted during this period. Of this 
group there were 75 admissions and 52 transfers from our wards. There were 
15 private patients, 10 operations and 2 deaths. Twenty-five patients were trans- 
ferred from the Isolation Unit back to their respective wards in the Hospital. 
The total census showed an increase of 25 patients over a corresponding period 
of time for the previous year. Since Dr. Cannon Eley's departure, the Isolation 
Unit and the arduous task of guarding against contagious disease in the wards 
of the hospital has been taken over by Dr. John Davies. 

The Medical Out-Patient Department has always found its greatest problem 
that of continuing to provide useful diagnostic and therapeutic service to a 

32 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



group of children so great as to strain its staff facilities. The demands of the 
national emergency have caused a considerable decrease in the number of regu- 
larly attending physicians. To meet this situation a reorganization of the 
schedule for internes was made so that they could come to the clinic for a few 
hours on alternate mornings and work with the out-patients. This has been a 
highly successful arrangement in that it has provided an important type of 
training for these young physicians and has increased the number of patients for 
whom appointments are possible to a point even above that of last year. 

The clinic has been greatly strengthened by the assistance of Dr. Gertrud 
Wyatt as a consultant and teacher for children with difficulties of speech. The 
addition to the staff of Mrs. Penfield Roberts provides the valuable service of 
psychological testing for the many children who present questions of disturbed 
mental development. The lack of the electro-encephalogram, which was avail- 
able last year, is a considerable disadvantage in appraisement of numerous 
cnildren whose problems center about convulsive disorders. Restoration of this 
important diagnostic service is highly desirable. 

Two "good neighbors," Dr. Gustave Cardelle and Dr. Julio Meneghello, 
from Cuba and Chile, who hold visiting fellowships provided by the American 
Academy of Pediatrics, have given the clinic their services during a part of the 
past year. 

The various special clinics continue to provide to out-patients the advantage 
of systematic surveillance. The Eczema Clinic under Dr. L. W. Hill's direction 
cares for about half the patients with eczema admitted to the Out-Patient 
Department. Patients are limited to 20 each clinic day. It is also used ex- 
tensively as a consultation clinic. Although most of the children seen in this 
clinic are allergic, it is not primarily an allergy clinic, but is for the care and 
study of eczematoid dermatitis from whatever cause. It has been of great 
advantage to have been able to keep this clinic relatively small as it is possible 
in this way to study the patients more completely than if all the patients with 
eczema coming to the Out-Patient Department were admitted to the clinic. In 
the past 10 years 15 papers have been published from the clinic, on various 
aspects of eczema. 

About three years ago Dr. Nathan Talbot organized an Endocrine Clinic 
as part of a plan to provide special study of patients suffering from disorders of 
the glands of internal secretion. This clinic now has on its roster about 100 
children who exhibit evidence of malfunction of the pituitary, thyroid, adrenal 
or sex glands. In the laboratory of the Hospital certain new and simplified 
methods for diagnosis have been worked out by Dr. Talbot and applied to these 
patients. New types of therapy for dwarfed children and for patients with 
adrenal disease have been investigated with promising results. Dr. A. M. Hill 
directs the Syphilis Clinic. It may be noted, as gratifying evidence of the 
decline of this disease, that no new patients presented for admission during the 
past year. 

The year 1941 has seen a significant development in the care of children 
with rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease. Nearly four years ago at the 
suggestion of Dr. Blackfan, rheumatic children from the medical wards or Rheu- 
matic Fever Clinic were placed in an open-air pavilion at the Sharon Sanatorium. 
This was done with the hope that such management would reduce the incidence 
of upper respiratory infections and hence the recurrences of rheumatic fever 
which are so dangerous during the period of convalescence. There was freedom 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 33 



from respiratory infection and rhuematic fever to such an impressive degree that 
during 1941 the Directors of the Sharon Sanatorium rebuilt and equipped the 
whole sanatorium for the care of rheumatic children. Although the Children's 
Hospital had no official administrative connection with this development, Dr. 
Blackfan was its most enthusiastic sponsor; the patients were sent from the 
Children's Hospital; they were supervised by doctors from the Children's Hos- 
pital and after their discharge were followed by the Rheumatic Fever Clinic. 
The open-air sanatorium type of care for the rheumatic child appears to hold 
so much promise that it is now considered important to undertake an intensive 
clinical and laboratory investigation of this experiment as it progresses further. 
Therefore during 1942 several studies are planned in order to establish its true 
value. The Children's Hospital is largely responsible for this aspect of the work. 
This very successful liason with the Sharon Sanatorium was carried through and 
continues to be guided by Dr. John P. Hubbard from his position in command 
of the Rheumatic Fever Clinic. This clinic has continued to serve in its two-fold 
function of diagnosis and management of the rheumatic child. The consistency 
of care afforded by a constant personnel is not only of benefit to the patient but 
also gives junior members of the staff a chance to become familiar with the 
disease through its convalescent stages. 

Under the direction of Dr. Harold C. Stuart, the Hospital has continued 
to co-operate with the Department of Health of the City of Boston by providing 
space and facilities in the Out-Patient Department for a district infant and 
pre-school child health conference every Monday afternoon. In connection with 
this educational and preventive service provided by the City for the well children 
of the community under school age, the Department of Child Hygiene of the 
Harvard School of Public Health has conducted a teaching or demonstration 
health conference. This has been open to the house staff of the Hospital, and 
regularly attended by the third year medical students while on duty at the Hos- 
pital. Through this activity, an interest in the preventive aspects of pediatric 
practice has been stimulated, and an opportunity has been afforded students of 
medicine, public health and nursing to become more familiar with the charac- 
teristics of the healthy infant and the features of normal growth and development 
which deserve recognition. The physicians carrying on the routine work in this 
health conference are members of the Hospital staff, chosen by the University 
but working in this capacity for the City of Boston. 

The Medical Division has carried on its many and diverse undertakings over 
the past year with a degree of success which in view of adverse circumstances 
may be regarded as gratifying. The custom of acknowledging in this report the 
understanding co-operation of the Director of the Hospital and the loyal support 
of the Nursing Staff and of the Social Service Department is this year more than 
ever a suitable one. 

JAMES L. GAMBLE, M.D. 



34 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



MEDICAL DISEASES TREATED IN THE 
OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 

1941 

Diseases of the Newborn 

Icterus gravis neonatorum 1 

Pemphigus neonatorum 1 

Prematurity 16 

Umbilical protrusion 1 



Diseases oj Nutrition 

Acidosis 3 

Aerophagia 4 

Anorexia 20 

Celiac disease 4 

Celiac syndrome 7 

Dehydration 5 

Food capriciousness 19 

Improper feeding 299 

Ketosis 3 

Malnutrition Ill 

Nutritional disturbance, acute and chronic 61 

Pancreatic fibrosis 1 

Rickets 52 

Scurvy 25 

Tetany 5 

Vomiting, non-specific 33 



19 



652 



Diseases of the Respiratory System 

Anomaly of respiratory tract, congenital 1 

Deviated septum 8 

Epistaxis 21 

Foreign body in nose 3 

Furuncle, nose 2 

Hay fever 29 

Nasal obstruction 4 

Nasal polyp 2 

Sinusitis 74 

Asthma, bronchial 181 

Bronchial obstruction 1 

Bronchiectasis 4 

Tracheo-broncitis 15 

Croup 4 

Laryngeal stridor, congenital 17 

Laryngitis 11 

Atelectasis 4 

Pleurisy with effusion 1 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 35 



Diseases of the Respiratory System — (Continued) 

Pneumonia 33 

Pulmonary pathology with effusion 1 

Upper respiratory infection 707 



1,252 

Diseases of the Alimentary System 

Abscess, alveolar 4 

Caries, teeth 80 

Dental attrition 1 

Difficult dentition 5 

Gingivitis 4 

Malocclusion of teeth 3 

Pyorrhea 1 

Cleft palate 3 

Dilated vessels, palatine 1 

Geographical tongue 1 

Glossitis 1 

Plaques of tongue 1 

Tongue tie 6 

Micrognathia 2 

Stomatitis 51 

Thrush 15 

Trench mouth 1 

Vincent's angina 3 

Abscess, peritonsillar 1 

Adenoiditis 15 

Adenoids, hypertrophied 34 

Tonsillar tabs 1 

Tonsillitis 203 

Tonsils, hypertrophied 53 

Tonsils, infected 17 

Tonsils and adenoids, hypertrophied 188 

Tonsils and adenoids, infected 5 

Pharyngitis 124 

Nasopharyngitis 81 

Pylorospasm 5 

Pyloric stenosis, congenital 1 

Abdominal pain, cause undetermined 28 

Enteritis 18 

Indigestion, intestinal 10 

Intestinal parasites 50 

Intestinal stasis 1 

Mobile cecum 1 

Colic 3 

Colitis ,. 2 

Spastic colon 1 

Constipation 73 

Diarrhea, non-specific 59 

Fecal impaction 4 

Fecal incontinence 3 

36 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases of the Alimentary System — (Continued) 

Megacolon 1 

Biliary obstruction, congenital 1 

Cirrhosis of liver 1 

Hepatitis 1 

Hepatomegaly 2 

Hepato-splenomegaly 1 

Jaundice, catarrhal 10 

Diastasis recti 2 

Hernia, abdominal 1 

Hernia, inguinal 12 

Hernia, umbilical 33 

Anal polyp 1 

Fissure in ano 5 

Fissure, rectal 1 

Fistula, recto-perineal 1 

Spasm of sphincter 1 

Tight anal sphincter 1 

1,249 

Diseases of the Genito- Urinary System 

Aberrant renal vessel 1 

Hydronephrosis . 5 

Hypoplasia of kidney 1 

Nephritis 11 

Nephrosis 1 

Pyelonephritis 69 

Double ureter 1 

Hydro-ureter 1 

Uretero-pelvic obstruction 1 

Albuminuria, cause undetermined 16 

Albuminuria, orthostatic 34 

Anuria 1 

Bacilluria 2 

Dysuria 1 

Enuresis 94 

Hematuria 3 

Pyuria 10 

Balanitis 5 

Hydrocele 10 

Hypoplasia, genital 1 

Hypospadias 4 

Infection, prepuce 1 

Phimosis 51 

Preputial adhesions 7 

Redundant foreskin 4 

Torsion of penis 1 

Undescended testicle 16 

Adherent labia 1 

Leukorrhea 1 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 37 



Diseases of the Genito- Urinary System — (Continued) 

Vaginal defect 1 

Vaginitis 43 

Vulvitis 4 



Diseases of the Circulatory System 

Congenital heart disease 62 

Endocarditis 1 

Functional heart murmur 17 

Hypertension 4 

Hypertrophy of heart 1 

Mitral regurgitation 1 

Rheumatic heart disease 16 

Tachycardia 1 



Diseases of the Bood and Blood Forming 

Organs and Lymphatic System 

Anemia, erythroblastic 1 

Anemia, hypochromic 21 

Anemia, iron deficiency 27 

Anemia, microcytic 5 

Anemia, secondary 82 

Anemia, unclassified 35 

Blood dyscrasia 3 

Erythroblastosis, fetalis 2 

Hemophilia 2 

Leukemia 2 

Purpura 6 

Splenomegaly 7 

Lymphadenitis, unclassified 125 



Diseases of the Ductless Glands 

Cretinism 6 

Diabetes mellitus 4 

Hyperthyroidism 2 

Lipodystrophy 1 

Obesity 70 

Sex precocity 1 



402 



103 



318 



84 



Diseases of the Nervous System 

Amyotonia congenita 2 

Behavior problem 184 

Birth injury 22 

' Cerebral deficiency 86 

Cerebral hemorrhage 1 

Cerebral injury 2 

38 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases of the Nervous System — (Continued) 

Chorea 

Convulsions, cause undetermined 

Defective speech 

Delayed speech 

Dystrophy, pseudohypertrophic muscular. 

Encephalitis 

Encephalopathy 

Epilepsy 

Feeblemindedness 

Habit spasm 

Hydrocephalus 

Insomnia 

Intracranial damage 

Intracranial hemorrhage 

Meningismus 

Meningitis 

Meningocele 

Microcephalus 

Migraine 

Headache 

Mongolism 

Neurosis 

Nervous child 

Night terrors 

Palsy, cerebral 

Palsy, Erb's 

Paralysis, facial 

Paralysis, spastic 

Poliomyelitis, old 

Retarded development 

Scaphocephaly 

Somnambulism 

Spasmus nutans 

Spinal cord injury 

Syncope 

Tetraplegia 

Tumor, brain 

Vertigo 

Specific Infectious Diseases 

Chicken pox 

Diphtheritic stomatitis 

Dysentery 

Measles 

Measles, German 

Mononucleosis, infectious 

Mumps 

Pertussis 



13 

43 

43 
4 
2 
4 
7 

41 

27 

34 
4 
1 
2 
6 
1 
1 
1 

16 
6 
6 

31 
4 
2 
5 

16 
3 
7 

16 
4 

11 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
2 



24 
1 
6 

16 
2 
3 

31 

92 



670 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



39 



Specific Infectious Diseases — (Continued) 

Poliomyelitis, acute 1 

Rheumatic fever 24 

Roseola infantum 9 

Scarlet fever 7 

Streptococcus sore throat 1 

Syphilis 4 



Tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis, hilum 2 

Tuberculosis, pulmonary 14 

Tuberculin reactor 45 



221 



61 



Diseases oj the Musculoskeletal System 

Abnormalities, cranial bones, congenital 1 

Abnormalities, multiple, congenital 2 

Arthritis 2 

Bowlegs 8 

Chondrodystrophy 1 

Club feet 3 

Dislocation of hip, congenital 4 

Dwarfism 2 

Exostosis, astragalus 1 

Flat feet 8 

Fracture, clavicle 1 

Fracture, femur 1 

Fracture, humerus 1 

Fracture, metacarpal 1 

Fracture, skull 1 

Funnel chest 2 

Ganglion, wrist 1 

Hammer toe 1 

Kohler's disease 1 

Knock knees 9 

Lordosis j 3 

Myositis 2 

Osgood-Schlatter's Disease 1 

Pectus excavatum 3 

Poor posture 16 

Pronated feet 52 

Scoliosis 8 

Spina bifida 2 

Sprain 1 

Sprengel's deformity 1 

Strain 1 

Syndactylism 1 

Synovitis 2 

Torticollis, acquired 2 

40 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System — (Continued) 

Torticollis, congenital 1 

Toxic hip 1 

Valgus feet 3 

151 

Diseases of the Skin 

Abscess, head 3 

Abscess, upper extremity 1 

Acne 2 

Alopecia 1 

Burn 7 

Cellulitis 2 

Chilblains 1 

Cicatrix 1 

Dandruff 1 

Dermatographia 2 

Dermatitis 181 

Eczema 426 

Epidermophytosis 38 

Erysipelas 2 

Erysipeloid 1 

Erythema 5 

Erythrodermia 1 

Folliculitis 2 

Fungus infection 7 

Furunculosis 32 

Herpes 11 

Hydroa aestivale 1 

Hyperhidrosis 1 

Icthyosis 4 

Impetigo 164 

Insect bite 36 

Intertrigo 8 

Lymphangiectasis 1 

Miliaria 21 

Molluscum contagiosum 1 

Paronychia 5 

Pediculosis capitis 5 

Pemphigus 1 

Pityriasis rosea 13 

Poison ivy 8 

Pompholyx 1 

Prurigo 1 

Psoriasis 1 

Pyodermia 3 

Ringworm 25 

Scabies 29 

Scleroderma 1 

Seborrhea 20 

Sunburn 1 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 41 



Diseases of the Skin — (Continued) 

Telangiectasis 

Trichophytosis 

Trichotillomania 

Vitiligo 

Xanthomatosis 



1,084 



Diseases of the Eye 

Astigmatism 

Blepharitis 

Blindness 

Cataracts, congenital 

Chalazion 

Coloboma, congenital 

Conjunctivitis 

Dacrocystitis 

Defect of eye, congenital 

Edema, peri-orbital 

Enophthalmos 

Eye strain 

Foreign body, eye 

Hemorrhage, sclera 

Hordeolum 

Hypermetropia 

Impaired vision 

Internal squint 

Nystagmus, congenital 

Obliteration of tear duct, congenital . 

Occlusion, naso-lacrimal duct 

Ptosis 

Refractive error of eyes 

Retinitis 

Stenosis, lacrimal duct 

Strabismus 



5 

1 

2 

20 



88 



Diseases of the Ear 

Cerumen 

Deaf mute 

Deafness 

Foreign body, ear. 
Furuncle, ear. . . . 

Lop ears 

Mastoiditis 

Myringitis 

, Otitis externa. . . . 
Otitis media 



6 
1 
6 
1 
3 
1 
2 
1 
1 
316 



338 



42 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Tumors 

Adenoma 2 

Cyst 3 

Cyst, dermoid 1 

Cyst, retention 1 

Cyst, thyroglossal 2 

Epulis 1 

Fistula, thyroglossal 2 

Hemangioma 19 

Neurofibromatosis 1 

Nevus 9 

Papilloma 2 

Polyp, umbilicus 1 

Tumor, neck and face 1 

Warts 11 

Unclassified 

Abrasion 3 

Allergy 

Asphyxia 

Branchial cleft 

Concussion 

Contusion 

Edema, angioneurotic 

Foreign body 

Glycosuria 

Hematoma 

Hypoglycemia 

Ingestion, creosote 

Ingestion, iodine 

Ingestion, Lysol 

Ingestion, Sloan's liniment 

Ingestion, thyroid 

Intention tremor of hands 

Intoxication 

Laceration 

Laurence Biedle Moon Syndrome 

Masturbation 

Pellagra 

Pilonidal sinus 

Poisoning, carbon monoxide 

Poisoning, ergotamine tartrate 

Poisoning, lead 

Poisoning, santonin 

Puberty 

Serum sickness 

Stridor, congenital 

Trauma to head 

Urticaria 58 

Vaccination 4 



56 



125 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



43 



Unclassified — ( Continued) 

Dead 4 

Deferred 105 

Left clinic before seeing doctor 15 

No disease 471 



New cases 4,332 

Old cases. . 19,408 

Transfers 635 



595 



Total 24,375 



MEDICAL DISEASES TREATED IN THE WARDS 

1941 

Diseases of the Newborn New Old 

Anemia of prematurity 1 

Asphyxia neonatorum 1 

Regulation of feeding 2 

Erythroblastosis fetalis 2 

6 
Diseases oj Nutrition 

Celiac disease 15 25 

Gastro-enteritis 10 

Idiopathic pancreatic fibrosis 2 1 

Nutritional disturbance, acute and chronic 70 6 

Rickets 4 3 

Scurvy 3 



104 35 

Diseases oj the Respiratory System 

Abscess of lung 1 

Asthma 22 18 

Atelectasis, pulmonary 10 3 

Bronchiectasis 4 

Broncitis, acute 21 

Empyema 11 

Foreign body in bronchus 3 

Laryngitis 8 

Laryngo-tracheitis 7 

Neuroblastoma of lung 1 

Peritonsillar abscess 1 

Pharyngitis 75 2 

-Pneumonia 123 8 

Pneumonia, post-pertussis, chronic, with cor pulmonale .... 1 

Retropharyngeal abscess 2 

44 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases of the Respiratory System — (Continued) 

Sinusitis 27 2 

Tonsillitis 92 2 

Miscellaneous 4 



Diseases of the Genito- Urinary Tract 

Abscess, perinephric 

Albuminuria, cause undetermined 

Congenital malformations of urinary tract . 

Glomerulonephritis 

Hematuria, cause undetermined 

Hydronephrosis 

Hydroureter 

Nephrosis 

Nephrotic syndrome 

Pyelonephritis 

Renal calcinosis 

Renal disease, undetermined etiology 

Miscellaneous 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



413 35 

Diseases of the Alimentary System 

Abdominal pain, cause undetermined 23 2 

Abdominal tumor, probable 2 

Appendicitis 20 

Atresia of rectum 1 

Cirrhosis of liver 1 

Colitis 3 2 

Esophageal anomaly 1 

Foreigh body in esophagus 2 

Hepatitis 3 

Hepatomegaly, cause undetermined 1 

Hernia, inguinal 2 1 

Hernia, umbilical 3 

Intussusception 2 

Megacolon, secondary 1 

Peritonitis 4 

Pyloric stenosis 4 

Pylorospasm 2 

Stomatitis 6 

Stricture of rectum, congenital 1 

Ulcer, duodenal 1 

Ulcer, gastric 1 1 

Yellow atrophy of liver 1 

Miscellaneous 30 2 



113 10 



1 




5 




5 


4 


32 


11 


8 


4 


5 


1 


1 


1 


9 


4 


2 


2 


44 


17 


1 






1 


16 


1 


129 


46 




45 



Diseases of the Circulatory System 

Congenital heart disease 19 5 

Hypertension, etiology undetermined 2 1 

Idiopathic cardiac hypertrophy 1 1 

Myocarditis, toxic 2 

Patent ductus arteriosus 4 

Peri-arteritis nodosa 1 

Rhuematic heart disease 12 1 



41 8 

Diseases of the Blood and Blood-Forming 

Organs and Lymphatic System 

Anemia, cause undetermined 1 2 

Anemia, congenital 1 

Anemia, due to blood loss 2 1 

Anemia, due to iron deficiency 4 

Anemia, erythroblastic 4 

Anemia, hemolytic 1 

Anemia, macrocytic 1 

Anemia, secondary 2 

Anemia, sickle cell 1 

Hemophilia 4 11 

Hodgkin's disease 2 2 

Leukemia 10 2 

Lymphadenitis, unclassified 98 2 

Lymphadenoma 1 

Pancytopenia 1 1 

Polycythemia, compensatory 1 

Thrombocytopenic purpura 5 

Undiagnosed disease with lymphadenopathy 1 

136 25 

Diseases of the Ductless Glands 

Addison's disease 1 

Adreno- genital syndrome 1 

Atrophy of thyroid gland 1 

Benign hypertrophy of thyroid 1 

Diabetes mellitus 14 12 

Diabetic acidosis 4 2 

Dwarfism 1 

Goitre, toxic 2 

Hyperparathyroidism 1 

Hyperplasia, adrenal 1 

Hypertrophy of adrenal cortex 1 

Hypothyroidism 4 

Hypophyseal dwarfism 4 

Infantile dwarfism , 1 

Insufficiency, adrenal 1 2 

Myxedema 2 

Panhypopituitarism 1 



46 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases of the Ductless Glands — (Continued) 

Precocious puberty 1 

Retarded growth 1 

Virilism, due to hyper-adrenalism 1 

Diseases of the Nervous System 

Abscess of brain 

Amaurotic family idiocy 

Athetosis 

Behavior problem 

Birth injury of brain 

Brain tumor 

Brain tumor suspect 

Chorea 

Concussion, cerebral 

Congenital anomaly of brain 

Convulsions 

Convulsive disorders, unclassified 

Craniopharyngioma 

Deficiency, cerebral 

Deficiency, mental 

Encephalitis 

Encephalomyelitis 

Encephalopathy 

Epilepsy, idiopathic 

Fibrosarcoma of spinal cord 

Friedreich's ataxia 

Hematoma, subdural 

Hydrocephalus 

Idiopathic focal motor cortical seizures 

Meningismus 

Meningitis, aseptic lymphocytic 

Meningitis, influenzal 

Meningitis, meningococcus 

Meningitis, mumps 

Meningitis, pneumococcus 

Meningitis, streptococcus 

Meningitis, toxoplasmic 

Microcephaly 

Myelopathy 

Myeloradiculitis 

Palsy, brachial (obstetrical) 

Paralysis, spastic 

Poliomyelitis 

Psychoneurosis 

Thrombosis, cerebral 

Trigeminal neuralgia 

Tuberous sclerosis 

Miscellaneous 

439 72 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 47 



43 


17 


1 




2 




1 


1 


18 


1 


10 


4 


1 




2 


1 


11 




3 




7 


1 


47 


4 


12 


4 


1 




3 




78 


12 


16 


1 


1 


1 


60 


13 


37 


3 


1 




1 


1 


4 


1 


7 


2 


5 


1 


6 




1 




7 




2 




2 




3 


1 


2 




1 




2 




2 




2 




3 


1 


31 


14 


25 


2 


10 




2 




1 


1 


1 


1 


7 


1 



Specific Infectious Diseases 

Bacillary dysentery 

Bacteremia 

Cellulitis 

Common cold 

Diphtheria 

Exanthem subitum 

Erysipelas 

Furunculosis 

Infectious mononucleosis . 

Influenza 

Measles 

Mumps 

Perleche 

Pertussis 

Rheumatic fever 

Rheumatic fever suspect . 

Scarlet fever 

Septic sore throat 

Septicemia 

Syphilis 

Tetanus 

Typhoid fever 

Varicella 



3 
3 
6 
161 
2 
2 
3 
2 
2 
1 

15 
3 
1 

26 

36 
2 

25 
1 
6 
2 
3 
4 
6 



315 



14 



Tuberculosis 

Abscess, psoas 

Calcification of tracheo-bronchial lymphnodes . 

Tabes mesenterica 

Tuberculin reactor 

Tuberculosis contact 

Tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis, cervical lymphnodes 

Tuberculosis, spine 

Tuberculous meningitis 

Tuberculous pachymeningitis 

Tuberculous pleurisy with effusion 

Tuberculous pneumonia 



1 
1 

2 
7 
1 
12 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 



33 



Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System 

Absence of anterior abdominal muscles . . 

Absence of bones 

Anomaly of vertebra 

Arthritis 

- Arthrogryposis 

Bone changes of scurvy 

Deformities of extremities due to obesity . 



48 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System — (Continued) 

Dysostosis multiplex 1 

Flexion deformity of hip and knee 1 

Fracture, Colle's 1 

Fracture, femur 1 

Fracture, frontal bone 1 

Fracture, humerus 2 

Fracture, parietal bone 2 

Fracture, skull 

Fracture, tibia and fibula 1 

Funnel chest 1 

Hemarthrosis 2 

Osteochondrosis 1 

Osteomyelitis 7 

Septic hip 1 

Wringer arm 1 

Miscellaneous 2 

38 4 

Diseases of the Skin 

Abscesses 5 

Alopecia aerata 1 

Burns 1 

Contusions 6 

Dermatitis 13 

Eczema 22 

Erythema 7 

Erythrodermia 1 

Hemangioma 3 

Impetigo 11 1 

Infected dog bite 1 

Lacerations 5 

Lipochondrodystrophy 1 

Lymphangioma 1 

Molloscum contagiosa 1 

Moniliasis 1 

Paronychia 1 

Poison ivy 2 

Telangiectasis 1 

Urticaria 2 

86 1 

Diseases of the Eye 

Alternating estropia 1 

Anisocoria 1 

Atrophy, optic 1 

Cataract 2 

Coloboma, retina 1 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 49 



Diseases of the Eye — (Continued) 

Conjunctivitis 

Herpes simplex of lid 

Heterotopia 

Hyphymia 

Inflammation of meibomian cyst . 

Multiple styes 

Nystagmus 

Ocular hypertelorism 

Pappilledema 

Paralysis, abducens 

Retinitis nephritica 

Vascularized membranes of lenses . 



26 



Diseases of the Ear 

Deafness 

Mastoiditis 

Myringitis 

Otitis media 

Polypi, aural canal. 



1 

25 

1 

190 

1 



8 
18 



218 



26 



Unclassified 

Carotinemia 1 

Coma 1 

Deferred 41 

Disease undiagnosed 7 

Edema, angio-neurotic 1 

Exposure 23 

Gaucher's disease 2 

Hans-Schuller-Christian's syndrome 1 

Hay fever 2 

Hemorrhages 4 

Hyperkinesis 1 

Hypoglycemia, cause undetermined 1 

Infections 1 

Intestinal parasites 3 

Jaundice 3 

Laurence-Moon-Biedl syndrome 1 

Melena 2 

Multiple congenital anomalies 1 

No disease 20 

Obesity 8 

Overwhelming sepsis 1 

Poisoning, drug 13 

Poisoning, lead 1 

Pyrexia of unknown origin 7 



50 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Unclassified — (Continued) 

Reaction, drug 4 

Vaccinia 2 

152 



Number of cases treated on Medical Ward 1,041 

Number of cases treated on Private Ward 783 



Total 1,824 

New diagnosis 2,292 

Secondary diagnosis 304 



Total 2,596 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 51 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 
ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 

THE Department of Orthopedic Surgery has been very active during the past 
year. 

The Selective Service Act and the declaration of war have not disrupted the 
Staff service seriously this year. We lost one interne who was called up at the 
beginning of his last four months of duty. 

The year 1942 will present many new problems because our Visiting Staff 
will be depleted and it will be increasingly difficult to secure internes because 
the War Department allows for one year of internship after graduation from 
medical school. Our internes are selected from those who have had a previous 
internship of two years. Our plans for 1942 may have to be altered unless we 
can have some special arrangement with the Surgeon General's Office. The 
Army needs men who have had special training in orthopedic surgery, but if the 
Service is cut off, there will be no orthopedic surgeons for the Army. 

The country must come first, however, so it must be our aim to help when 
and where we can. 

The Harvard Medical School has changed its course from four years to three 
years which means that there will be medical students at the hospital the year 
around until the present emergency is over, thus adding a large burden to the 
hospital and to the teaching staff. 
Pathology: 

Dr. Nathan Rudo resigned at the end of his year because of being drafted, 
and was succeeded by Dr. Ruell Sloane. Dr. Rudo was of great assistance in 
teaching bone pathology to our internes. His work in neurofibromatosis of bone 
was noteworthy as well as his part in developing a method of visualizing the blood 
supply of the head of the femur. 

Dr. William T. Green has developed the Infantile Paralysis Clinic adding a 
section for the purpose of making the lives of those badly crippled from this 
disease more practical and more independent. Dr. Charles Sturdevant succeeded 
Dr. Leo McDermott as Dr. Green's assistant. Dr. Sturdevant was also given 
an appointment on the Staff as Junior Visiting Surgeon. 
Chief Resident: 

Dr. Eugene Record was appointed chief resident, September first, 1941, to 
succeed Dr. Sturdevant. 

The Department received a gift of $5000 this year to be used for research. 

The Department of Physical Therapy in conjunction with the Harvard 
Medical School and the Sargent School of Physical Education of Boston Uni- 
versity is training physical therapy technicians for the War Department. These 
are intensive six months' courses and follow the requirements of The Council 
on Medical Education of the American Medical Association. 

My heartfelt thanks are given to my own associates, House Staff, nurses, 
director, and to all the other Departments of the Hospital for their kindly 
co-operation. 

I also wish to express my appreciation to the Board of Managers for its 
sympathetic attitude in helping to meet our problems. 

FRANK R. OBER, M.D. 
52 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



ORTHOPEDIC OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT REPORT 

1941 

Congenital Deformities 

Torticollis 54 

Anomalies of spine 17 

Deformities of shoulder girdle and upper extremities 5 

Congenital dislocation of hip 19 

Club feet 41 

Other deformities of lower extremities 51 

Miscellaneous 11 

198 

Deformities of Unspecified Etiology 

Pronated feet 626 

Other deformities of the feet 31 

Knock knees 113 

Bow legs 65 

Deformities due to contractures 31 

Abnormalities due to muscular or ligamentous relaxation . . 5 

Other miscellaneous deformities 15 

886 

Infectious and Inflammatory Diseases 

Osteomyelitis 4 

Epiphysitis 6 

Periostitis 1 

Cellulitis, abscess, etc 3 

Tenosynovitis 14 

Bursitis 3 

Arthritis, infectious or rheumatoid 6 

Synovitis, etiology unspecified 14 

51 

Traumatic Conditions 

Fractures and dislocations , 102 

Sprains and strains 71 

Contusions, lacerations, etc 18 

Post-traumatic deformities 6 

197 

Metabolic and Deficiency Diseases 

Rickets (with and without deformity) 38 

Scurvy 3 

Obesity 4 

45 

Neurogenic Disorders 

Cerebral palsies (including mental retardation) 31 

Brachial palsies 8 

Anterior poliomyelitis, acute and chronic 8 

Unspecified 2 

49 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 



53 



Tumors 

Osteochondroma and exostosis 3 

Lipoma 1 

Hemangioma 2 

Miscellaneous Orthopedic Conditions 

Pseudohypertrophic muscular dystrophy 3 

Dyschondroplasia 1 

Osteochondritis dissecans 3 

Osgood-Schlatter's disease 3 

Koehler's disease 4 

Coxa plana (Legg-Perthes disease) 7 

Coxa vara 3 

Popliteal cysts and other ganglia 13 

Miscellaneous conditions 2 



39 



Non-orthopedic Conditions 28 

No disease found 59 

Diagnosis deferred 20 

Patient not seen by doctor 12 

119 

New cases 1,010 

Old cases. . 10,391 

Transfers 440 

Total 11,841 



ORTHOPEDIC DISEASES TREATED IN THE WARDS 

1941 

Congenital Malformations 

Head and neck 

Congenital torticollis 21 5 

Klippel-Fiel syndrome 1 1 

Other deformities 2 1 

Upper extremities and scapulae 

Sprengei's deformity 4 3 

Others 1 3 

Spine and thorax 

Congenital scoliosis 2 

Spina bifida with and without meningocele 10 12 

Others 5 1 

Congenital dislocation of hip 31 15 

Deformed feet (all forms) 51 49 

Other congenital deformities of lower extremities and pelvis 11 5 

- Multiple congenital anomalies 3 4 

Arthrogryposis 5 4 

145 105 
54 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Generalized Disturbance of Bone Growth 

Dyschondroplasia 2 

Osteogenesis imperfecta 3 

Rickets 13 



Traumatic Conditions 

Fractures 

Femur 

Humerus 

Forearm (one or both bones ) . 

Others 

Dislocations 

Soft tissue injury 

Acute torticollis 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 



18 4 

Inflammatory or Infectious Diseases 
Osteomyelitis, acute and chronic 

Femur 7 4 

Humerus 3 

Others 11 5 

Sclerosing osteitis and osteoid osteoma 1 1 

Arthritis 

Suppurative 7 

Rheumatoid 10 

Non-specific, including "toxic" synovitis. 19 3 

Bursitis 3 

Cellulitis, abscess, or ulceration 6 

Dermatomyositis 3 

Tuberculosis of bone 2 6 

Anterior poliomyelitis 

Acute and convalescent 19 5 

Post-poliomyelitic deformities 

Paralysis unspecified 

Short leg 

Scoliosis 

Deformities of feet and legs 

140 11 

Other Neurogenic Disorders 

Cerebral palsy 

Anomalies and diseases of cord 

Brachial palsy • 

Paralytic dislocations and deformities 



15 


11 


27 


11 


7 


2 


3 


20 



36 


12 


8 


1 


3 


3 


4 


5 



51 21 



14 


1 


8 


5 


7 




7 




1 


1 


7 




7 




51 


7 




55 



Tumors 

Lipoma 1 1 

Lymphangioma 1 

Osteochondroma 2 

Bone cyst 1 1 

Giant cell 2 1 

Neurofibromatosis 1 

Miscellaneous 

Eosinophilic granuloma 2 1 

Osteochondritis dissecans 1 



10 



1 




2 


1 


7 




5 


2 


7 




7 


6 


29 


9 


36 


10 


405 




73 






478 


460 




232 





Miscellaneous Diseases 

Coxa plana 

Slipped femoral epiphysis 

Popliteal ganglion 

Dislocation of cervical spine (varied etiology). . 
Scoliosis (other than congenital and post-polio). 
Unclassified 



Non-orthopedic diseases 

Number of cases on Orthopedic Ward 

Number of cases treated on Private Ward 

Total 

New cases 

Secondary diagnosis 

Total 692 



ORTHOPEDIC OPERATING ROOM REPORT 
1941 

Procedures for Correction of Deformities Whether Congenital, 
Neurogenic, or Metabolic 

Arthrodesis of tarsal joints 

Triple arthrodesis 25 

Triple arthrodesis with muscle transplant 16 

Other types of tarsal arthrodesis including bone blocks . . 3 

Spinal fusion 4 

Reduction of dislocated hip 

Closed (including remanipulation) 19 

Open 9 

Fasciotomies 

Soutter type 3 

Plantar 6 

Other types 1 

56 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Procedures of Correction of Deformities — (Continued) 

Posterior capsulotomies and Ober ligamentous procedures 

with and without heel cord lengthening 

Myotomies and tendon lengthening 

Sternomastoid myotomy 

Other myotomies 

Tendon lengthening 

Muscle and tendon transplants 

Erector spinae transplant 

Neurectomies 

Osteoclases 

Osteotomies 

Leg lengthening 

Epiphyseal arrest 

Specific corrective procedures 

Ober operation for Sprengel's deformity 

Sever operation for brachial palsy with contracture 

Miscellaneous corrective procedures 

Procedures for Traumatic Conditions 

Closed reduction of fracture or dislocation 

Open reduction 

Reconstructive procedure 



23 

24 
6 

15 

27 
2 
7 
5 

13 
1 

18 

2 

1 

12 



18 

4 
2 



242 



24 



Procedures for Inflammatory Conditions 
Osteomyelitis 

Incision and drainage 18 

Change of dressing 4 

Sequestrectomy 3 

Biopsy 2 

Arthritis 

Aspiration 8 

Incision and drainage 5 

Arthrotomies for other cause 3 

Lysis of adhesions in chronic tenosynovitis 2 

Treatment of bursitis (incision and drainage and excision ) . 3 

Biopsy or excision of neoplastic and related types of lesion. 15 
Minor procedures (manipulations, application of plaster, 

insertion and removal of wires, etc. ) 74 

Non-orthopedic procedures (tonsillectomy and adenoid- 

ectomy , etc. ) 12 

Total number of operations 415 

Total number of anesthesias on Orthopedic Ward 413 

Total number of anesthesias on Private Ward 84 

Total 

ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 



40 



497 
57 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

1941 

THE loss of Dr. Blackfan affects deeply the Department of Pathology in many 
ways. He was quick to grasp the importance of the contribution which a well 
organized active Department of Pathology could make to the care of patients 
on his service, to the investigation of medical problems of disease in early life, 
support towards the organization and maintenance of a well-equipped labora- 
tory of pathology. In the belief that his house officers would be better equipped 
to care for their patients on the wards and in their future private practice, Dr. 
Blackfan arranged to have as many as possible spend some of their period of 
training in this department. His keen interest in the lesson derived from each 
postmortem examination set an example which influenced his entire staff. Rec- 
ognizing the opportunities for progress in the pathology of early life at a time 
when most children's hospitals were poorly provided for in this field, Dr. Blackfan 
utilized to the full the resources of the Department of Pathology in the support 
of his research program. One of the major reasons for the growth during the 
past 19 years has been the stimulation derived from an attempt to meet the 
demands which Dr. Blackfan placed upon the Department of Pathology. 

The year 1941 saw continued progress in the achievement of the aims of the 
department as set forth in the reports of previous years with emphasis on the 
three great functions of the department: routine, teaching, and research. In the 
summer months, as though in anticipation of the emergency, the laboratory was 
filled to capacity with regularly appointed house officers, research workers. 

The organization of the department has been flexible enough to permit 
adaptation of our resources to the rapidly changing demands from the outside 
world and to the many necessary adjustments within the hospital. Although all 
plans of the department have been reconsidered in the light of the times, no effort 
has been spared to prevent an unnecessary lowering of standards. The teaching 
activities in the department are being oriented particularly towards supplement- 
ing the training which internes and medical students are receiving on the hos- 
pital wards so that these men may take away as much of the accumulated ex- 
perience of the hospital as is possible in the short period of time they spend 
here. In this, as in research and in routine, the Department of Pathology 
continues to be of service to all three medical divisions and to all parts of the 
hospital. 
Appointments: 

On July 1, 1941, Dr. Lent C. Johnson, Jr., became Resident Pathologist, 
succeeding Dr. Henry W. Edmonds, who left to become resident in pathology 
at the Massachusetts General Hospital. 

Dr. Lawrence C. Kingsland left, after completing a one year's interneship, 
on November 1, to become house officer in pediatrics. 

The usual surgical sequence was followed by Dr. Frank Nulsen and Dr. H. 
William Scott, who entered the surgical service after abbreviated periods in the 
pathology laboratory. The last of the interneships consisting of six months in 
bacteriology and six months in pathology were held by Dr. Edward Pratt and 
Dr. Thomas Weller, both of whom began services in the Department of Pediatrics 
after leaving the laboratory. These have been temporarily discontinued. Four 

58 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



members of the Department of Orthopedic Surgery spent eight months each in 
pathology before beginning ward duties — Drs. Troxler, Keizer, Zecchino, 
Hildebrand. 

On July 1, Dr. Campelia succeeded Dr. Maurice Dinnerman as house officer 
in stomatology, spending part of his time, as is customary, in this department. 

Dr. Ernest K. Landsteiner, who had been a voluntary assistant in the 
Department of Pathology from July 1 to November 1 , was forced to give up his 
interneship in Pathology which he began in November, after only two months, 
in order to help relieve the acute shortage in surgical internes at the Peter Bent 
Brigham Hospital. 

On September 1, 1941, Dr. Harry Shwachman, of the Department of 
Pediatrics, succeeded Dr. Charlotte L. Maddock as Research Fellow in Pathology. 
Dr. Maddock took a full time position with Dr. Hinton in the State Department 
of Health. 

Dr. Nathan Rudo, Research Fellow in Orthopedic Pathology, left after 
completion of his year, on September 1, and is now in the medical department of 
the Navy. He was succeeded by Dr. Ruell A. Sloan, who began on November 1. 

Dr. Ethel Cermak, formerly resident in pediatrics at the Albany Hospital, 
served as voluntary assistant from July 1, 1941 to February 1, 1942, and Dr. 
William Berenberg from July 1, 1941 to March 31, 1942. Dr. Berenberg was 
released so that he might take an interneship on the medical service of this 
hospital. Dr. Norman De Wilde is carrying out special research in the Depart- 
ment of Stomatology and Pathology, which he began July 1, 1941. 

In the summer of 1941 the following students, who had finished their second 
year at Harvard Medical School, served as student voluntary assistants in 
Pathology: Falls Hershey, Frank Wheelock, Robin Anderson, Douglas Robin- 
son, Hathorn Brown, H. W. Clatworthy, Jr., Charles Lovell, G. R. Livermore, 
H. Brown, J. R. Spencer, and W. R. Eyler. 

Dr. Maximiliano Salas, Major in the Medical Corps of the Mexican Army, 
was guest assistant in the Department of Pathology from March 1941 to March 
1, 1942. The stay of Dr. Salas was arranged at the request of the Mexican 
government, through Dr. Gomez, chief of the New Infants' Hospital, now being 
built and equipped in Mexico City. Dr. Salas, a man of many years training in 
pathology, had as his chief purposes the acquisition of expert knowledge in the 
field of children's pathology and the study of the organization of this department. 
On his return to Mexico City Dr. Salas became Chief Pathologist to the New 
Infants' Hospital. 

The second volume of Dr. Conel's studies on the Postnatal Development of 
the Cerebral Cortex, that at one month of age, has appeared. The third volume 
of the series is being prepared for publication. The two volumes in print are 
impressive in appearance and content and have been enthusiastically received 
by neurologists and psychiatrists. I am glad to report that the John and Mary 
R. Markle Foundation will continue to give support to Dr. Conel's work for a 
period of three years. Funds for publication of succeeding volumes are not 
in sight. 

Productive activities in the Dental Pathology room have been continued 
under Dr. Boyle's direction, with the assistance of Dr. Losch and Dr. Campelia. 

The organization of the Bone Pathology Room has progressed satisfactorily 
and well arranged files of reprints and pathologic specimens relating to ortho- 
pedic pathology are now available for workers in this field. 

PATHOLOGY DEPARTMENT 59 



Under Dr. Farber's direction the investigation of the pancreatic aspects of 
the celiac syndrome is being continued. Emphasis is placed upon the analysis 
of pancreatic enzymes in the differentiation of the diseases giving rise to the 
celiac syndrome. Dr. Farber has shown that the initial lesion of "fibro-cystic 
disease" of the pancreas occurs in many other glandular organs and that its 
genesis has probably been discovered by him. He has succeeded in reproducing 
experimentally the pancreatic lesion in a manner which indicts the sympathetic 
nervous system. It is of interest to record that the reasoning which has brought 
into view a solution of a very difficult problem took origin in the performance 
of carefully conducted postmortem routine studies. 

The research activities of the Department of Pathology are becoming in- 
tegrated more and more with those of the Departments of Medicine, Surgery, 
and Orthopedic Surgery. Progress in clinical fields is often dependent upon 
concurrent progress in the pathology of the subject under investigation. It is 
the aim of the department always to be adequate in this respect. The very 
considerable success it has had is due to the great effectiveness of Dr. Farber in 
knowledge, organization and administration. 

At the Children's Hospital we include in our conception of pathology, all 
of the responses of the living organism to disease. In the experimental work of 
the department, morphological studies may and often do play a minor role 
while physiologic and chemical technics often predominate. We look forward 
to a further extension of the very satisfactory clinical facilities now existing, as a 
prerogative of the pathologist in pursuit of new knowledge. 

S. BURT WOLBACH, M.D. 



60 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



AUTOPSIES 

Deaths Autopsies 

Infants' Hospital 92 73 

Children's Hospital* 85 68 

Private Ward 31 18 

Additional 20 

Total 208 179 



AUTOPSIES PERFORMED 

Year Children's^ 

1939 84 

1940 73 

1941 86 



Infants' 


Additional^ 


Total 


98 


14 


196 


104 


11 


188 


73 


20 


179 



TOTAL DEATHS 

Year Children' st Infants' Total 

1939 126 118 234 

1940 123 121 244 

1941 116 92 208 

PERCENTAGE OF AUTOPSIES OBTAINED 

1939 73.6 83.05 77.7 

1940 62.6 85.1 75.0 

1941 80.0 79.4 76.4 

SURGICAL SPECIMENS EXAMINED 

Year Number 

1939 678 

1940 708 

1941 730 

*Includes all services but Infants' and Private Ward 
"{"Includes Private Ward 

{Additional — includes all examinations on patients not at the Hospital at the 
time of death 



PATHOLOGY DEPARTMENT 



61 



REPORT OF THE SURGICAL SERVICE 

1941 

IN the annual report of the Surgical Service for the year 1940 it was stated 
that this department faced the probability of being obliged to carry on with 
a very much reduced personnel. This situation has indeed come to pass; seven 
men from the Visiting Staff and five from the Resident Staff have joined the 
armed forces of the country. Also, as the demand for surgeons in the Army and 
Navy becomes more urgent, the internes and residents are being allowed less 
and less time for training after their graduation from the medical schools. The 
time in 1942 which will be allowed by the Army or Navy for a student for hos- 
pital training subsequent to graduation is one year from the date of his gradua- 
tion. This means that all internes must start their hospital work at the same time 
or that some must have less than a year of postgraduate training before being 
inducted into the armed services. Under these circumstances the three to five 
year training program which had been established by combining the facilities 
of the Children's Hospital and the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital will have to be 
abandoned. Each hospital will be able to offer a one year course of post-graduate 
training. 

However, by a series of adjustments and assignments of work between the 
Visiting and Resident Staff the amount of work of the surgical department was 
not curtailed during the year 1941. It is believed that the service to the children 
of the country can be carried on at the same rate in the future, but that investi- 
gative work and the number of publications may have to be reduced during the 
emergency. 

In the year 1941 there were 3352 admissions to the surgical wards as compared 
to 3314 the preceding year. The mortality varied less than half of one per cent 
in the two periods. Patients presenting more complicated surgical problems are 
being more frequently referred to this clinic each year from a larger geographical 
area. This increases the percentage of grave surgical risks to the total number 
of surgical procedures done. Considering this fact and the depleted surgical 
staff the record appears creditable. 

The Surgical Staff feels keenly the loss of Dr. Kenneth D. Blackfan, as does 
the rest of the hospital. His friendly consultations in the Surgical wards were 
always gratifying to the surgeons and helpful to the patients. They will be greatly 
missed. 

The Board of Managers have always given freely of their time and energies 
for the benefit of the hospital, and they may look forward to the opportunity of 
being of even greater service during the troublesome times ahead. 

The teaching load from the Harvard Medical School is to be increased during 
the coming year. To meet this situation the Surgical Department is going to 
ask for as much help from technicians as is feasible in order to lighten the burden 
of work of the Resident Staff. 

-Below are listed the names of the Surgical Staff who have joined the armed 
forces with the ranks held, and following this is a list of the publications of the 
members of this department during the year. 

62 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Lt. Col. Thomas H. Lanman, M. C. Fifth General Hospital (Harvard University 
Unit) 

Major Carlyle G. Flake, M. C. Fifth General Hospital (Harvard University 
Unit) 

Major Augustus Thorndike, M. C. Fifth General Hospital (Harvard University 
Unit) 

Lt. Com. Henry W. Hudson, Jr., M. C. U. S. N. R. 

Lt. Com. Patrick J. Mahoney, M. C. U. S. N. R. 

Lt. John W. Chamberlain, M. C. U. S. N. R. 

Lt. Com. Charles I. Johnson, M. C. U. S. N. R. 

1st. Lt. Robert R. White, M. C. Fifth General Hospital (Harvard University 
Unit) 

1st. Lt. F. Dale Wilson, M. C. U. S. A. 

1st. Lt. Charles L. Dimmler, Jr. M. C. Fifth General Hospital (Harvard Uni- 
versity Unit) 

1st. Lt. Hannibal Hamlin, M. C. U. S. N. R. 

WILLIAM E. LADD, M.D. 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 63 



PUBLICATIONS 
1941 

Ladd, W. E. and Gross, R. E.: Abdominal Surgery of Infancy and Childhood. 

(Philadelphia: W. B. Saunders Co., 1941). 
Ladd, W. E.: Hernia in Infancy and Childhood. The Nebraska Journal, 24:7: 

234, July, 1941. 
Ladd, W. E.: Intestinal Obstruction in Infancy. (Panel Discussion, American 

Academy of Pediatrics. ) In publication. 
Ladd, W. E., Gatch, W. D., Packard, G. B. and Penberthy, G. C: Intestinal 

Obstruction in Children. (Panel Discussion, American College of Surgeons. ) 

In publication. 
Ladd, W. E. and White, R. R.: Embryoma of the Kidney (Wilms' Tumor). 

J. A. M. A., 117:1858-1862, November 29, 1941. 
Lanman.T. H. :Chairman of special committee appointed by the Massachusetts 

Medical Society to draw up and present to Legislature an Enabling Act on 

Prepaid Medical Care. N. E. Jr. M, 224:3:125-127, January 16, 1941. 
Lanman, T. H. : Some Surgical Problems in Infancy and Childhood. In process 

of being translated into Spanish for publication in El Dia Medico, Buenos 

Aires. 
Lanman, T. H. : Acute Abdominal Conditions in Infants and Children. (Panel 

Discussion, American College of Surgeons. ) In publication. 
Lanman, T. H. and Dimmler, C. L. Jr.: Management of Acute Empyema in 

Children. Am. Jr. Surg., 54:1 :29-34, 1941. 
Lanman, T. H.: Contribution to Dr. Quinby's Festschrift. November, 1941. 
Ingraham, F. D. and Campbell, J. B. : Dangers of Radiation Without Biopsy of 

Brain Tumors in Children. N. E. Jr. M., 224:925-927, May 29, 1941. 
Ingraham, F. D. and Campbell, H. B. : Marcus Gunn Phenomenon. Arch. Neur. 

& Psych., 40:127-134, July, 1941. 
Ingraham, F. D. and Campbell, J. B. : An Apparatus for Closed Drainage of the 

Ventricular System. Annals of Surg., //4":6:1096-1098, December, 1941. 
MacCollum, D. W.: Burns of the Hand. J. A. M. A., 116:2371-2377, May 24, 

1941. 
Eppinger, E. C, Burwell, C. S. and Gross, R. E.: The Effects of the Patent 

Ductus Arteriosus on the Circulation. J. Clin. Investigation, 20:127, 1941. 
Wyatt, G. M. and Gross, R. E.: Chylous Ascites. Am. J. Roentgenol., 45:848, 

1941. 
Gross, R. E. : Surgical Closure of the Patent Ductus Arteriosus. Modern Con- 
cepts of Cardiovascular Disease, Vol. 10, No. 12, (Dec), 1941. 
Hudson, H. W. Jr. : Childhood Abdominal Surgery. N. E. Jr. M, 226:9 :360-362, 

February, 1942. 
Thorndike, A. Jr. and Dimmler, C. L. Jr. : Fractures of the Forearm and Elbow 

in Children. An Analysis of 364 Consecutive Cases. N. E. Jr. M., 225: 

475-480, 1941. 
Thorndike, A. Jr. and Quigley, T. B.: Injuries to the Acromioclavicular Joint. 

A Plea for Conservative Treatment. Am. Jr. Surg., LV:2:250-261, 1942. 
Thorndike, A. Jr. : Monograph — Manual of Strapping, Bandaging and Splinting. 

Lea and Febiger, Phila. 1941. 
Thorndike A. Jr.: Monograph — Athletic Injuries. Second edition. Lea and 

Febiger, Phila. 1941. 

64 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Chamberlain, J. W. and Lawrence, K. B. : Congenital Sarcoma of Extremities. 

Report of 2 Cases. Am. Jr. Dis. Child., 62:793-800, October, 1941. 
Tobey, H. G.: Medical Treatment of Meniere's Disease. Surg. Gyn. and Obst., 

72:425-430, February 15, 1941. 
Richards, L. G. : The Open Safety Pin. A Consideration of Its Peroral Removal 

from The Upper Air and Food Passages. N. E. Jr. M., 225:561-571, 1941. 
Richards, L. G. : Vegetal Foreign Bodies in the Bronchi : Analysis of Forty Cases. 

Annals oj Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology , 50:3:860, September, 1941. 
Richards, L. G. : Otogenic Complications. A Resume and Discussion of the 

Literature for 1940. The Laryngoscope, St. Louis, September, 1941. 
Ganz, R. N., Lyons, C. and Ferguson, C. F. : Chemotherapy and Serotherapy 

of Acute Otitis Media. Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology, 

10:4:1185, December, 1941. 



SURGICAL OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT REPORT 

1941 

Diseases of the Ductless Glands 

Diabetes 1 

Frohlich's syndrome 1 

Obesity 2 

Pituitary dysfunction 1 



Respiratory System 

Asthma 1 

Bronchiectasis 1 

Bronchitis 1 

Deviated septum 2 

Epistaxis 2 

Foreign body, nose 1 

Foreign body, throat 1 

Furnuncle, nose 1 

Hematoma, septum 1 

Laryngitis 1 

Pneumonia 1 

Rhinitis 1 

Sinusitis 1 

Tonsillitis 21 

Tonsils, hypertrophied 2 

Tonsils and adenoids, hypertrophied 16 

54 

Alimentary System 

Abdominal pain, undetermined origin 104 

Abscess, alveolar 1 

Abscess, ischio-rectal 1 

Abscess, peri-rectal 2 

Anal tab 2 

SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 65 



Alimentary System — (Continued) 

Appendicitis 13 

Branchial cleft 1 

Branchial cleft sinus 7 

Carious teeth 2 

Cleft palate 25 

Constipation 32 

Diarrhea 4 

Diastasis recti 2 

Dysentery 2 

Ectopic anus 1 

Enteritis 22 

Esophageal stricture 1 

Evulsion, tooth 1 

Fecal impaction 3 

Fecal incontinence 1 

Fissure in ano 6 

Fissure, rectal 2 

Foreign body in gastro-intestinal tract 26 

Foreign body in stomach 12 

Frenulum, lip 3 

Gastritis 1 

Harelip » 10 

Harelip and cleft palate 9 

Hemorrhage, ileum 1 

Hemorrhoids 1 

Hirschsprung's disease 1 

Imperforate anus 1 

Intestinal parasites 5 

Macroglossia 1 

Macrostomia, congenital 1 

Melena 1 

Micrognathia 1 

Nasopharyngitis 6 

Nutritional disturbance 35 

Pharyngeal diverticulum 1 

Pharyngitis 4 

Polyp, rectal 17 

Prolapse of rectum 21 

Pylorospasm 2 

Pyloric stenosis 15 

Tab rectal 2 

Thrush 1 

Thyroglossal cyst 9 

Thryoglossal fistula 1 

Thyroglossal sinus 1 

Tight anal sphincter 1 

Tongue tie 37 

' Vomiting 2 



464 

66 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Genito- Urinary System 

Adherent labia 2 

Adhesions, labia majora, congenital 1 

Adhesions, meatal 1 

Adhesions, vaginal , 1 

Anuria 1 

Atrophy of testicle 1 

Balanitis 8 

Cystitis 4 

Edema of retracted foreskin 1 

Enuresis 5 

Foreign body in vagina 1 

Frequency, urinary 2 

Hematuria 2 

Hydrocele 64 

Hydronephrosis 3 

Hypertrophy of breast 

Hypospadias 

Imperforate hymen 

Infantile genitalia 

Infected prepuce 

Internal torsion of testicle 

Lactating breast 

Long foreskin 2 

Mastitis 3 

Meatal ulcer 10 

Paraphimosis 16 

Patent urachus 1 

Phimosis 1 74 

Preputial adhesions 26 

Pyelitis 2 

Pyelonephritis 2 

Redundant foreskin 73 

Renal colic 

Retention of urine 

Ruptured kidney 

Traumatic fat neurosis, breast '. 

Undescended testicle 

Urethral stenosis 

Urethral stricture 



476 



Cardio-Vascular Diseases 

Congenital heart disease . 
Hypertrophy of heart . . . 
Patent ductus arteriosus . 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 



3 

67 



Lymphatic System 

Abscess, submental 2 

Adenitis, axillary 12 

Adenitis, cervical 77 

Adenitis, epitrochlean 1 

Adenitis, femoral 2 

Adenitis, inguinal 9 

Adenitis, maxillary 1 

Adenitis, mesenteric 3 

Adenitis, occipital 4 

Adenitis, preauricular 4 

Adenitis, submandibular 1 

Adenitis, submaxillary 3 

Adenitis, submental 1 

Lymphadenitis 3 

Lymphangitis 1 

Lymphangioma 3 



127 



Nervous System 

Aneurysm 1 

Behavior problem 2 

Birth injury 2 

Brain tumor, suspect 1 

Cephalhematoma 2 

Cerebral deficiency 1 

Concussion 14 

Convulsions 7 

Defective speech . 6 

Edema, angioneurotic 1 

Encephalocele 2 

Epilepsy 3 

Facial asymmetry 1 

Headache 1 

Head injury 3 

Hematoma, extra dural 1 

Hydrocephalus 10 

Intracranial pathology 1 

Masturbation 2 

Meningitis 1 

Meningocele 29 

Mental deficiency 1 

Mental retardation 3 

Microcephalus 1 

Myelomeningocele 1 

Night terrors 1 

Palsy, brachial 1 

Palsy, Erb's 1 

Paralysis, facial 1 

68 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Nervous System — (Continued) 

Spina bifida. . . 17 

Spina bifida with meningocele 3 

Synostosis, cranial 2 



123 



Diseases oj the Skin 

Abrasions 55 

Abscesses 45 

Adenoma 1 

Anomaly of skin, congenital 1 

Avulsion, toenail 2 

Bite, cat 1 

Bite, dog 28 

Bite, human 2 

Bite, insect 15 

Bite, rat 2 

Blister 7 

Burn 47 

Cicatrix 5 

Contusions 16 

Cyst 46 

Dermatitis 34 

Ecchymosis 2 

Eczema 4 

Eponychia 7 

Erythema 1 

Fibroma, forehead 1 

Foreign body 22 

Furunculosis 69 

Glioma 1 

Granuloma of umbilicus 9 

Hemangioma 286 

Hematoma 18 

Hygroma, cystic 2 

Impetigo 13 

Infection, umbilicus 1 

Ingrown nails 3 

Keloid 4 

Keratosis 1 

Lacerations 309 

Lipodystrophy 1 

Lipoma 3 

Mole 7 

Mucocele, lip 1 

Nevus 30 

Omphalitis 1 

Papilloma, umbilicus 1 

Paronychia 38 

Pediculosis capitis 1 

SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 69 



Diseases of the Skin — (Continued) 

Puncture wound 28 

Ringworm 1 

Roseola 1 

Scabies 1 

Scars, congenital 2 

Sunburn 5 

Tumor 4 

Warts 32 

Wart, plantar 5 

Wringer injuries 5 



Diseases of the Bones and Joints 

Amputation, finger 3 

Anomalies, toes and fingers, congenital. . 1 

Arthritis 1 

Asymmetry, skull 2 

Asymmetry, chest, physiological 1 

Bifid thumb 2 

Bursitis 1 

Calcinosis, leg 1 

Claw hands and feet 1 

Club foot 1 

Cyst, Baker's 3 

Dactylitis 1 

Deformity, arm, congenital 2 

Deformity, chest, congenital 1 

Deformity, fingers, congenital 3 

Deformity, hand, congenital 2 

Epiphysitis, leg 1 

Exostosis 2 

Fractures 107 

Fusion, fingers 1 

Multiple anomalies 1 

Osteochondritis, tibia 1 

Osteoma, toe 1 

Pigeon breast 1 

Pilonidal sinus 6 

Polydactylism , 9 

Pronated feet 2 

Rickets 1 

Syndactylism 5 

Trigger finger 2 

Wormian bone, congenital 1 



Diseases of the Muscles, Tendons and Fascia 

Absence of pectoralis major 1 

Contractures 3 

Flexion deformity, finger 1 

70 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases of the Muscles, Tendons and Fascia — (Continued) 

Ganglion 11 

Hernia, diaphragmatic 2 

Hernia, epigastric 2 

Hernia, incisional 1 

Hernia, inguinal 189 

Hernia, scrotal 8 

Hernia, umbilical 103 

Tendon laceration, old 1 

Sprain 39 

Strain 12 

Torticollis, acquired 1 

Torticollis, congenital 3 

377 

Diseases of Eye and Ear 

Absence of ears 2 

Cerumen 1 

Corneal laceration 1 

Conjunctivitis 2 

Deformity, ears, congenital 2 

Edema, eyelid 1 

Foreign body, eye 10 

Furuncle, eye 1 

Hemorrhage, subconjunctival 1 

Hordeolum 3 

Lacerated sclera 1 

Lop ears 4 

Nystagmus 1 

Otitis media 49 

Preauricular tabs 1 

Ptosis 4 

Stenosis, lacrimal duct 1 

Strabismus 1 

86 

Miscellaneous 

Assault 1 

Bleeding umbilicus 2 

Chicken pox 2 

Coeliac disease 1 

Dehydration 1 

Fatigue 1 

Feeding, regulation of 1 

Grippe 2 

Hyperactivity . 1 

Infections 27 

Influenza 1 

Lordosis 1 

Malnutrition 1 

Measles 2 

SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 71 



Miscellaneous — ( Continued ) 

Multiple injuries, old 1 

Mumps 3 

Scarlet fever 1 

Scurvy 5 

Serum sickness 1 

Undulant fever 1 



Deferred 24 

Eloped 16 

No disease 58 

Not seen 6 



New cases 2,415 

Old cases 10,850 

Transfers 646 



56 



104 



Total 13,911 



OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT OPERATIONS 
With Anaesthesia 

Circumcisions 161 

Debridement 8 

Endothermy for hemangioma 113 

Extraction of tooth 1 

Freeing of frenum for tonguetie 1 

Fractures, reduction of 39 

Incision and drainage of abscesses and septic wounds 71 

Meatotomy 1 

Paracentesis 153 

Proctoscopy 9 

Rectal dilatation 3 

Removal of cysts 13 

Removal of hemangioma 10 

Removal of foreign body in ear 2 

Removal of foreign body (region unspecified) 1 

Removal of mucocele 1 

Removal of nail for paronychia 3 

Removal of polyp in ear 1 

Removal of preauricular tabs 4 

Removal of toe 1 

Removal of warts 1 

Removal of wen 6 

Roentgen ray treatments with anaesthesia 19 

Urethral dilatation 14 

72 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Vaginal examination 3 

Wound sutures 47 



Total number of etherizations 674 

Total number of operations 686 

Without Anaesthesia 

Carbon-dioxide snow treatments 551 



SURGICAL DISEASES TREATED IN THE WARDS 

1941 

Diseases of the Ductless Glands New Old 

Adenoma of pituitary 2 

Adiposo-genital dystrophy 1 

Diabetes mellitus 1 

Neuroblastoma, adrenal gland 2 1 

Toxic nodular goitre 1 



Diseases of the Respiratory System 

Asthma - 

Atelectasis 

Atresia of nares 

Bronchiectasis 

Bronchitis 

Common cold 

Empyema 

Fistula, broncho-cutaneous 

Fistula, broncho-pleural 

Hemorrhage, pulmonary 

Hypertrophied tonsils and adenoids 

Laryngeal obstruction 

Laryngitis 

Mediastinitis 

Pharyngitis 

Pneumonia 

Sinusitis 

Stricture of larynx 

Tumor of lung 

Undetermined injury of respiratory tract. 



1 


» 


6 


1 


1 




2 


9 


1 


2 


6 




15 


6 


1 


2 


2 


4 


1 


1 


15 






1 


1 




1 




22 




34 


2 


1 






1 


1 


1 


1 





112 30 



Diseases of the Alimentary System 

Abdominal pain, ? etiology 48 2 

Absence of abdominal wall musculature 1 

SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 73 



Diseases of the Alimentary System — (Continued) 

Adhesions, peritoneal 2 

Alveolar defect 14 3 

Anomaly of bile ducts 11 1 

Appendicitis 106 5 

Atresia, anus 9 5 

Atresia, esophageal . . . 4 1 

Atresia, intestine 4 

Cleft palate 28 4 

Congenital anomalies, not listed 6 6 

Constipation 6 

Colitis, ulcerative 2 6 

Cysts and tumors of gastro-enteric tract 31 5 

Dental caries 9 1 

Dilatation of alimentary tract 1 

Dilatation of colon , 3 

Duplication of esophagus 1 1 

Esophageal stricture 7 

Esophageal varices 1 

Evisceration 2 

Excoriation, anus 1 

Fibrosis and degeneration of liver 1 

Fibrosis of pancreas 2 

Fissure in ano 1 

Fistula, fecal 1 1 

Fistula, peri-rectal 1 

Fistula, peritoneal 3 

Fistula, recto-perineal 1 1 

Fistula, recto-urethral 2 2 

Fistula, recto- vesicle 1 

Fistula, tracheo-esophgeal 2 

Foreign body in gastro-enteric tract 3 

Gastro-enteritis 6 

Gingivitis 1 

Harelip 35 3 

Harelip and cleft palate 44 31 

Hemoperitoneum 1 

Hemorrhage, gastro-intestinal tract 6 

Hepatitis 3 

Impacted feces 5 

Imperforate anus 9 

Incontinence of feces 3 2 

Injury to wall of sigmoid 1 

Inspissated meconium in rectum 1 

Intestinal obstruction 11 1 

Intussusception 21 1 

Jaundice 1 2 

Laryngo-tracheitis 2 

Macroglossia 1 

Malrotation of intestines 10 

74 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases of the Alimentary System — (Continued) 

Meckel's diverticulum 6 

Megacolon 5 1 

Melena, cause undetermined 4 1 

Mucocele, appendix 1 

Mucous cyst of lip 1 

Omphalo-mesenteric duct, persistent 1 

Oxyuriasis of appendix 3 

Perforation of esophagus 1 

Peritonitis, primary 4 3 

Polyposis of intestine 4 2 

Proctitis 1 

Prolapse, rectal mucosa 3 

Pyloric stenosis 50 

Pylorospasm 1 

Ranula 1 

Rupture of cecum 1 

Rupture of spleen 2 

Spasm of sphincter ani 1 

Splenomegaly 1 

Stomatitis 1 

Stricture, rectum 1 

Thrombosis, splenic vein 1 

Ulcer, duodenal 1 

Ulcer, rectum 1 1 

Ulcer, stomach 1 

Undiagnosed disease, neoplasm suspected 1 

Volvulus of intestine 4 

Vomiting, cause undetermined 9 1 



576 104 

Diseases of the Genito- Urinary System 

Anomalies of genitalia 

Anomalies of kidney and ureter 

Cryptorchidism 

Cystitis 

Dilated peri-anal veins 

Enuresis 

Epispadias 

Exstrophy of bladder 

Fistula, recto- vaginal 

Fistula, ureter 

Foreign body in vagina 

Glycosuria, cause undetermined 

Hematuria, cause undetermined 

Hemorrhage, renal 

Hydrocele 

Hypospadias 

Incontinence of urine 

SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 75 



8 


1 


31 


17 


23 


1 


4 




1 




2 




2 


4 




10 


2 


1 


1 




1 




1 




4 


1 


1 




52 


1 


8 




1 


1 



Genito- Urinary System — (Continued) 

Phimosis 

Pyelonephritis 

Renal rickets 

Rupture of kidney 

Stab wound in scrotum 

Stricture, ureter 

Stricture, urethra 

Stricture, uretero- vesicle orifice. 

Torsion of appendix testis 

Trigonitis 

Tumors of genito-urinary tract. 

Uremia 

Vaginal bleeding 



19 
15 



2 

10 



11 



199 



61 



Diseases of the Cardio-Vascular System 

Congenital heart disease 

Heart disease, rheumatic 

Idiopathic enlargement of heart . . . 

Neiman-Pick's disease 

Patent ductus arteriosus 

Phlebitis 

Thrombo-phlebitis, saphenous vein . 
Varicose veins 



9 
4 

1 

12 
2 
1 
1 



30 



14 



Diseases of the Lymphatic System 

Cystic hygroma 

Cyst, lymphatic 

Hemangio-lymphangioma . . 
Hyperplasia of lymphnodes . 

Lymphadenitis 

Lymphadenitis, mesenteric . 

Lymphangitis 

Lymphangioma 



5 
1 

1 
2 
17 
2 
1 
6 



35 



Diseases of the Nervous System 

Abscess, cerebral 5 

Anomaly of central nervous system 12 

Arachnoiditis 3 

Arnold-Chiari syndrome 2 

Atrophy, cortical 5 

-Behavior problem 1 

Birth injury 6 

Brain tumor 11 



76 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases of the Nervaus System — (Continued) 

Cephalhematoma 4 1 

Chorea 1 

Cicatrix of cortex 1 

Collapse of vertebra 1 

Compression of cauda equina 1 

Concussion, cerebral , 23 1 

Cyst, dermoid, of dura 1 

Deficiency, mental 3 

Developmental phasia 2 

Disease undiagnosed, brain tumor suspected 4 2 

Encephalitis 3 

Encephalocele 4 

Encephalopathy, cause unknown 9 

Ependymoma 1 

Epilepsy 10 1 

Glioma 3 

Gliosis, frontal lobe 1 

Hematoma, epidural 1 

Hematoma, extradural 1 

Hematoma, parietal bone 1 

Hematoma, subdural 27 6 

Hematomyelia, cervical cord 2 

Hemiparesis 1 

Hemorrhage, intracranial 7 1 

Hydrocephalus 24 9 

Idiopathic convulsive state 14 1 

Intracranial calcification 1 

Lipoma, of cauda equina 4 1 

Melanoma of meninges 1 

Meningismus 2 

Meningitis 9 

Migraine 2 

Mongolism 1 

Myelitis, transverse 1 

Neuritis of 7th nerve, cause unknown 1 

Neuroblastoma, frontal lobe 2 

Neurofibroma 1 

Palsy, cerebral 1 

Papilloma of choroid plexus 1 

Paralysis, facial, post-traumatic 2 

Paralysis, post-poliomyelitis 8 1 

Paralysis, spastic 3 

Paralysis, urinary bladder 1 

Penetrating wound of sciatic nerve 1 

Poliomyelitis, acute, anterior 1 

Spina bifida occulta 8 2 

Spina bifida with encephalocele 1 

Spina bifida with meningocele 15 3 

Spina bifida with myelomeningocele 6 4 

Thrombosis, cerebral vessel 1 

SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 77 



Diseases of the Nervous System — (Continued) 

Thrombosis, Rolandic vein 

Tumor, spinal cord 

Undiagnosed disease of brain 

Varix of cerebral vein 

Vertigo 



270 



54 



Diseases of the Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue 

Abscesses 57 3 

Angio-endothelioma 1 1 

Branchiogenetic sinus 4 

Burns 28 1 

Cellulitis 17 

Cicatrix 10 4 

Cyst of skin 5 

Dermatitis 5 

Dermatophytosis 1 

Dog-bite 1 

Eczema 2 

Foreign body 1 

Furunculosis 7 1 

Hemangioma of skin 22 6 

Impetigo 5 

Infections 5 

Laceration 94 

Lipomatosis 1 

Necrosis of skin 4 1 

Paronychia 5 

Splinter, forearm 1 

Tumors of skin 15 1 

Ulcers 6 

Wringer arm 15 

Wringer hand 1 

Wringer thumb 1 

Xanthoma 1 

315 18 

Diseases of the Bones and Joints 

Adventitious bursa 1 

Arthritis 2 

Avulsion, radial epiphysis 1 

Bone cyst of humerus 1 

Compression, dorsal vertebra 1 

Congenital anomaly of bone 21 1 

Contractures, post-poliomyelitis 1 

Displacement of epiphysis 3 

Ewing's tumor 1 2 

Exostosis 2 



78 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases of the Bones and Joints — (Continued) 

Foreign body in knee 1 

Fractures 88 

Hemivertebra 2 

Lordosis 1 

Osteogenic sarcoma 2 

Osteomyelitis 18 

Rickets 1 

Scoliosis 2 

Septic joint 6 

Talipes equino- varus 

Trigger finger 1 



1 
14 



Diseases of the Muscles, Tendons and Fascia 

Diastasis recti 

Ganglion 

Hematoma, sternocleidomastoid muscle. 

Hernia, diaphragmatic 

Hernia, epigastric 

Hernia, incisional 

Hernia, inguinal 

Hernia, umbilical 

Omphalocele 

Severed extensor tendon 



156 



1 
5 
1 
5 
1 
5 
219 
36 
5 
1 



25 



279 



11 



Diseases of the Eye and Ear 

Anomaly of ear (not lop ear ) 8 

Anomaly of eye 13 

Lop ears 6 

Mastoiditis 3 

Otitis media 53 



2 
10 



Systemic Diseases, Hospital Complications and 
Miscellaneous 

Agranulocytosis 

Anemia, secondary 

Bacteremia 

Disease undiagnosed 

Eosinophilia 

Exposure to contagion 

Feeding problem 

Hematoma, thorax 

Hypertension 

Hypertonicity of infancy 

Icterus neonatorum 



83 



1 
53 

4 
2 



12 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 



79 



Systemic Diseases, Hospital Complications and 

Miscellaneous — (Continued ) 

Influenza 1 

Ingrown toenail 1 

Leukopenia 1 

Lipochondrodystrophy 1 

Malnutrition 2 

Marasmus 3 

No disease 4 

Purpura, thrombocytopenic 1 

Rheumatic fever, active 2 

Serum sickness 3 

Syphilis 4 

Tuberculin reactor 10 

Tuberculosis, pulmonary 7 

Vaccinia 1 

Wassermann reaction position 2 



116 12 

Number of cases admitted to Surgical Ward 1,408 

Number of cases admitted to Private Ward 388 

Total 1,796 

New Diagnosis 2,176 

Secondary Diagnosis 348 

Total 2,524 



SURGICAL OPERATING ROOM REPORT 
1941 

Operations of the Ductless Glands 

Biopsy 

Bone flap with exploration 

Burr holes, ventriculogram and encephalogram 

Encephalogram 

Encephalogram with x-rays 

Exploratory laparotomy and pyloromyotomy 

Excision 

10 



Operations of the Respiratory System 
Atelectasis 

Bronchoscopy with lipiodol 3 

Cystoscopy with retrograde pyelography 1 

Exploratory thoracotomy with biopsy and lysis of ad- 
hesions 1 

80 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Operations of the Respiratory System — (Continued) 

Bronchiectasis 

Bronchoscopy with lipiodol 6 

Bronchoscopy with lipiodol and cauterization 1 

Lobectomy 2 

Empyema 

Bronchoscopy with lipiodol 1 

Incision and drainage 1 

Intercostal drainage 2 

Rib resection 5 

Rib resection with drainage 4 

Hemorrhage, pulmonary 

Exploration 1 

Hypertrophied tonsils 

Tonsillectomy 1 

Mediastinal mass 

Marsupialization 2 

Sinusitis 

Bronchoscopy with lipiodol 1 

Stricture, larynx 

Tracheal dilatation 1 

Tumors of lung 

Biopsy 1 



34 



Operations of the Alimentary System 

Abdominal pain, ? cause 

Appendectomy 4 

Exploratory laparotomy with appendectomy 8 

Exploratory laparotomy with appendectomy and biopsy. 1 

Exploratory laparotomy with lysis of adhesions 1 

Proctoscopy 1 

Retrograde pyelograms 1 

Absence of abdominal wall musculature 

Freeing of bladder from wall 1 

Adhesions, intestinal 

Laparotomy with lysis of adhesions 1 

Adhesions, peritoneal 

Lysis of adhesions 1 

Anomaly of bile ducts 

Anastomosis 1 

Cholecystoduodenostomy 2 

Exploration 6 

Exploration and biopsy 1 

Exploration and irrigation 1 

Appendicitis 

Appendectomy 72 

Appendectomy with drains 40 

Appendectomy with exploratory laparotomy 10 

Appendectomy with lysis of adhesions 1 

Appendectomy with resection 2 

SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 81 



Operations of the Alimentary System — (Continued) 

Atresia, anus 

Anastomosis 1 

Closure of colostomy 1 

Colostomy 

Gastrostomy 1 

Plastic 6 

Atresia, esophageal 

Gas dressing and marsupialization 1 

Atresia, intestinal 

Anastomosis 1 

Anastomosis with lysis of adhesions 1 

Entero-enterostomy 1 

Bleeding, rectal 

Proctoscopy 3 

Cleft palate 

Plastic 23 

Congenital anomalies, not listed 

Cecostomy and appendectomy 1 

Closure of cecostomy 1 

Colostomy 1 

Excision 1 

Ileostomy 2 

Resection and anastomosis 1 

Colitis, ulcerative 

Ileostomy 1 

Proctoscopy 7 

Cysts and tumors of the gastro-enteric tract 

Biopsy 2 

Bronchoscopy 1 

Cystoscopy 1 

Disarticulation and resection 2 

Excision 18 

Excision and appendectomy 2 

Exploratory laparotomy with biopsy 3 

Gastrostomy 1 

Gastrostomy and biopsy 1 

Incision and drainage 2 

Laparotomy with excision 1 

Dental caries 

Extraction of teeth 10 

Esophageal stricture 

Dilatation 7 

Esophagoscopy with cauterization 1 

Esophagoscopy with dilatation 2 

Gastrostomy 1 

Evisceration 

Suturing 1 

Fibrosis 

Biopsy 1 

82 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Operations of the Alimentary System — (Continued) 

Fistula, recto-urethral 

Closure 1 

Dilatation 1 

Fistula, tracheo- esophageal 

Closure 2 

Gastrostomy 1 

Ligation 2 

Foreign body in gastro-enteric tract 

Laparotomy with removal 1 

Removal and suturing 1 

Harelip 

Plastic 26 

Harelip and cleft palate 

Extraction of teeth 2 

Packing to palate 1 

Plastic to lip 18 

Plastic to nose 2 

Plastic to palate 11 

Hemorrhage, gastro-intestinal tract 

Exploratory laparotomy and appendectomy 1 

Proctoscopy 3 

Hepatitis 

Exploratory laparotomy with biopsy 1 

Imperforate anus 

Colostomy 7 

Lysis of adhesions 3 

Impacted feces 

Irrigation 1 

Incontinence of feces 

Sigmoidostomy 3 

Intestinal obstruction 

Duodeno-jejunostomy 3 

Enterostomy 1 

Exploratory laparotomy 1 

Exploratory laparotomy with cecostomy 1 

Exploratory laparotomy with lysis of adhesions 2 

Freeing of adhesions 1 

Intussusception 

Exploratory laparotomy 3 

Reduction 8 

Reduction and appendectomy 3 

Reduction and exploratory laparotomy 3 

Malrotation of intestines 

Ladd's operation 2 

Reduction 1 

Megacolon 

Excision with lumbar sympathectomy 1 

Proctoscopy 1 

Mucocele of appendix 

SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 83 



Operations of the Alimentary System — (Continued) 

Appendectomy with excision 

Mucous cyst of lip 

Excision 

Oxyuriasis of appendix 

Appendectomy 

Peritonitis, idopathic 

Incision and drainage 

Polyposis of intestine 

Proctoscopy with electro-cautery 

Proctoscopy with excision 

Proctoscopy, sigmoidostomy and colostomy 

Prolapse of rectal mucosa 

Proctoscopy 

Pyloric stenosis 

Pyloromyotomy 

Rupture of spleen 

Splenectomy 

Splenomegaly 

Splenectomy 

Stricture, rectum 

Exploration 

Proctoscopy with irrigation 

Stricture, urethral 

Dilatation with removal of catheter 

Ulcer, rectum 

Proctoscopy 

Undiagnosed disease, neoplasm suspected 

Incision and drainage, exploratory laparotomy and biopsy 
Volvulus of intestine 

Exploratory laparotomy and ileostomy 

Reduction 



461 



Operations oj the Genito- Urinary System 

Anomalies of genitalia 

Exploration with excision 1 

Orchidectomy 1 

Anomalies of kidney and ureter 

Appendectomy 1 

Cystoscopy 2 

Cystoscopy with pyelograms 3 

Dilatation with freeing of adhesions 1 

Exploration, ligation and division 1 

Hemi-nephrectomy 3 

Ligation 3 

Ligation and division 1 

Nephrectomy 3 

Nephropexy 1 

Pyelograms 1 



84 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Operations of the Genito- Urinary System — {Continued) 

Ureterectomy with freeing of adhesions 

Cryptorchidism 

Orchidopexy 

Dilatation, peri-anal veins 

Proctoscopy 

Enuresis 

Cystoscopy 

Exstrophy of bladder 

Cystectomy 

Uretero-sigmoidostomy 

Fistula, recto-vaginal 

Plastic 

Foreign body in vagina 

Ether examination 

Hematuria, cause undetermined 

Cystoscopy 

Hydrocele 

Excision 

Hydronephrosis 

Cystectomy with pyelograms 

Cystoscopy 

Cystoscopy with pyelograms 

Cystotomy with excision 

Exploration 

Freeing of adhesions 

Nephrectomy 

Nephrectomy and appendectomy 

Pyelograms 

Hypospadias 

Dilatation 

Plastic 

Incontinence of urine 

Uretero-sigmoidostomy 

Phimosis 

Circumcision 

Pyelonephritis 

Cystoscopy 

Cystoscopy with pyelograms 

Suprapubic cystotomy and plastic 

Stricture, ureter 

Cystoscopy with pyelograms 

Exploration with freeing of adhesions 

Freeing of adhesions 

Stricture, urethra 

Dilatation 

Gas dressing 

Suprapubic cystotomy, urethrotomy and plastic. 
Stricture, uretero-vesicle orifice 

Cystoscopy with pyelograms 



10 



33 

1 
1 

7 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
3 

1 
2 



19 

1 
3 
1 

2 
1 

2 

4 
1 
1 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 



85 



Operations of the Genito- Urinary System — (Continued) 

Exploration 

Tumors of genito-urinary tract 

Biopsy 

Biopsy with partial excision 

Cystoscopy with ether examination 

Excision 

Nephrectomy '. 

Orchidectomy 



147 



Operations of the Cardio-Vascular System 
Heart disease 

Angio-cardiogram and exploration. . . . 

Pericardiostomy and esophagoscopy . . . 
Idiopathic enlargement of heart, syncope 

Pneumoencephalogram 

Patent ductus arteriosus 

Angio-cardiogram 

Ligation 

Varicose veins 

Ligation 



2 
15 



21 



Operations of the Lymphatic System 
Cyst, lymphatic 

Excision 

Hemangio-lymphangioma 

Biopsy 

Hygroma 

Excision 

Hyperplasia of lymphnodes 

Biopsy 

Lymphadenitis 

Incision and drainage 

Lymphadenitis, mesenteric 

Appendectomy and biopsy. . . 

Exploration and biopsy 

Lipochondrodystrophy 

Splenectomy and biopsy 

Lymphangiectasis 

Plastic 

Lymphangioma 

Excision 

Incision and marsupialization. 

Resuturing of wound 

- Supra-clavicular lymphnode 

Excision 



28 



86 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Operations of the Nervous System 

Abscesses, cerebral 

Bone flap, partial, with drainage 1 

Bone flap and ventriculostomy 1 

Burr holes with drainage 1 

Debridement , 1 

Decompression 1 

Exploration 2 

Incision and drainage 1 

Needling 1 

Removal of frontal lobe with drainage 1 

Ventriculogram 1 

Ventriculogram with x-rays 2 

Anomaly of central nervous system 

Bone flap 1 

Decompression 2 

Encephalogram 2 

Ventriculogram, bone flap and exploration 1 

Athetosis 

Bone flap with excision 2 

Bone flap with stimulation 1 

Excision 1 

Atrophy, cerebral 

Pneumo-encephalogram 1 

Ventriculogram, encephalogram and x-rays 1 

Atrophy, cortical 

Encephalogram, burr holes and ventriculogram 1 

Birth injury 

Burr holes 1 

Exploration 1 

Pneumo-encephalogram 1 

Brain tumor 

Bone flap 4 

Bone flap with excision 1 

Bone flap with exploration 1 

Burr holes 3 

Burr holes and encephalogram 1 

Burr holes and ventriculogram 1 

Craniectomy and cranioplasty 1 

Craniotomy with evacuation 3 

Encephalogram and ventriculogram 1 

Evacuation 3 

Exploration 5 

Exploration and biopsy 1 

Incision and drainage 1 

Ventriculography 2 

Compression of cauda equina 

Laminectomy 1 

Convulsions 

Bone flap with stimulation 1 

SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 87 



Operations of the Nervous System — (Continued) 

Burr holes 

Convulsive disorder 

Bone flap, partial, with encephalo- ventriculogram . 

Bone flap, partial, with stimulation and excision. . 

Burr holes 

Encephalogram 

Lumbar puncture and ventricular tap 

Pancreatectomy, splenectomy and biopsy 

Pneumo-encephalogram 

Cyst, dermoid, of dura 

Excision 

Disease undiagnosed, brain tumor suspected 

Burr holes 

Encephalogram 

Exploration 

Encephalitis 

Burr holes 

Burr holes with decompression 

Burr holes with lumbar puncture 

Encephalogram 

Excision 

Encephalopathy, cause unknown 

Bone flap with ventriculogram 

Burr holes 

Burr holes and encephalogram 

Decompression 

Encephalogram 

Ventriculogram 

Epilepsy 

Burr holes 

Craniotomy 

Encephalogram 

Ventriculogram 

Glioma 

Bone flap 

Headache with disturbance of vision 

Pneumo-encephalogram 

Hematoma, subdural 

Bone flap 

Bone flap with excision 

Burr holes 

Burr holes and bone flap : . 

Craniotomy 

Encephalogram 

Sequestrectomy 

Hematomyelia, cervical cord 

Laminectomy 

Hemiparesis 

Burr holes 



10 
5 

21 
2 

1 
1 
1 



88 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Operations of the Nervous System — (Continued) 
Hemorrhage, intracranial 

Bone flap 

Burr holes 

Partial scalp flap 

Hydrocephalus 

Burr holes 

Craniotomy 

Encephalogram 

Exploration 

Removal of drainage tube 

Torkildsen procedure 

Ventricular tap 

Ventriculostomy 

Ventriculostomy with coagulation of adhesions . 
Intracranial calcification 

Pneumo-encephalogram 

Lipoma of cauda equina 

Excision 

Meningitis 

Subtemporal decompression and bone flap. . . . 

Ventriculogram 

Encephalocele 

Excision 

Myelitis, transverse 

Laminectomy, freeing of adhesions and biopsy . 
Neurofibroma 

Excision 

Palsy, cerebral 

Pre-motor cortical excision and bone flap 

Papilloma of choroid plexus 

Bone flap with excision 

Paralysis, facial, post-traumatic 

Burr holes 

Exploration 

Paralysis, urinary bladder 

Laminectomy with freeing of adhesions 

Uretero-sigmoidostomy 

Penetrating wound of sciatic nerve 

Exploration 

Suturing 

Spina bifida occulta 

Laminectomy 

Lumbar exploration with lysis of adhesions . . . . 
Spina bifida with encephalocele 

Excision 

Spina bifida with meningocele 

Excision 

Laminectomy with excision 

Spina bifida with myelomeningocele 

Excision 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 



89 



Operations of the Nervous System — (Continued) 
Varix of cerebral vein 

Bone flap 1 

Burr holes 1 

Vertigo 

Encephalogram 1 

Exploration 1 



Operations of the Skin 

Abscesses 

Incision and drainage 31 

Angio-endothelioma 

Biopsy 1 

Excision 1 

Burns 

Debridement 9 

Debridement and tanning 3 

Plastic 1 

Plastic and Thiersch graft 1 

Raising rope graft and transplant 1 

Thiersch graft 4 

Thiersch graft and excision 1 

Cellulitis 

Incision and drainage 3 

Cicatrix 

Dressing 1 

Plastic 2 

Thiersch graft 3 

Thiersch graft with excision 2 

Cysts of skin 

Excision 4 

Foreign body 

Removal 1 

Furunculosis 

Incision and drainage 3 

Hemangioma of skin 

Endothermy 4 

Excision 11 

Snow treatment .• 2 

X-ray treatment 3 

Lacerations 

Cleansing and dressing 1 

Debridement and exploration 1 

Debridement and suturing 8 

Ether examination 1 

Irrigation and suturing 8 

Lysis of adhesions 1 

Plastic repair 1 

Reduction, fluoroscopic 1 

90 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Operations of the Skin — (Continued) 

Suturing 19 

Molluscum contagiosum 

Excision and evacuation 1 

Paronychia 

Incision and drainage 1 

Splinter, forearm 

Removal 1 

Tumors of skin 

Biopsy 1 

Excision 8 

Excision and Thiersch graft 1 

Ulcer 

Thiersch graft 1 

Wringer arm 

Closure, complete 1 

Incision and drainage 10 

Thiersch graft 2 

Wringer hand 

Incision and drainage 1 

Xanthoma 

Curettage 1 



161 



Operations of the Bones and Joints 

Bone cyst of humerus 

Curettage 1 

Congenital anomaly of bone 

Excision 3 

Plastic 5 

Contracture 

Straightening 1 

Ewing's tumor 

Biopsy 1 

Exostosis 

Excision 2 

Foreign body in knee 

Removal 1 

Fractures 

Application of plaster 2 

Burr holes 4 

Cranioplasty 2 

Debridement 2 

Elevation 4 

Insertion of Kirschner wires 3 

Manipulation 1 

Manipulation and application of plaster 1 

Manipulation and reduction 1 

Reduction, closed 22 

Reduction, fluoroscopic 5 

SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 91 



Operations of the Bones and Joints — (Continued) 

Reduction, open 

Removal of wires 

Removal of wires and application of plaster 

Injury to wall of sigmoid 

Exploratory laparotomy with plication 

Lipomatosis 

Biopsy 

Osteomyelitis 

Bone flap with excision 

Gas dressing and curettage , 

Incision and drainage 

Incision and drainage and partial sequestrectomy. 

Sequestrectomy 

Septic joint 

Incision and drainage 

Incision and drainage and marsupialization 

Marsupialization 

Sequestrum formation of mandible 

Tooth extraction and sequestrectomy 

Trigger finger 

Freeing of adhesions 

Tumor of finger 

Biopsy 



89 



Operations oj the Muscles, Tendons and Fascia 
Division of tendons 

Repair 

Ganglion 

Excision 

Hematoma, sternocleidomastoid muscle 

Removal 

Hernia, diaphragmatic 

Bronchoscopy 

Herniorrhaphy 

Removal of sutures 

Hernia, epigastric 

Herniorrhaphy 

Hernia, incisional 

Herniorrhaphy 

Hernia, inguinal 

Herniorrhaphy 

Herniorrhaphy with exploration 

Herniorrhaphy with reduction 

Hernia, umbilical 

Herniorrhaphy 

Hernia into cord 

Excision 



17 



22 



92 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Operations of the Muscles, Tendons and Fascia — (Continued) 
Omphalocele 

Repair 

Severed extensor tendon 

Irrigation, debridgement and suturing 



227 



Operations oj the Eye and Ear 

Anomaly of ear (not lop ear ) 

Excision 

Plastic 

Anomaly of eye 

Bone flap 

Bone flap with exploration. 

Excision 

Evisceration 

Fascial sling 

Lop ears 

Plastic 

Otitis media 

Myringotomy 



18 



Operations of Systemic Diseases, Hospital 
Complications and Miscellaneous 
Ingrowing toenail 

Radical cure 2 

Leukemia 

Splenectomy and biopsy 1 

Pancytopenia 

Biopsy 1 

Purpura, thrombocytopenic 

Splenectomy 2 

Sinus, branchiogenetic 

Endothermy < : 1 

Excision 2 

Sinus tract 

Excision 1 

Tuberculosis, pulmonary 

Excision 1 

Retrograde pyelograms 1 

Retrograde pyelograms and cystoscopy 1 

Total number of operations 

Total number of anesthesias on Surgical Ward 1,112 

Total number of anesthesias on Private Ward 753 

Total 

SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 



13 
1,438 

1,865 
93 



EAR, NOSE AND THROAT DEPARTMENT 

DURING the year 1941 the work of the Ear, Nose and Throat Service has pro- 
gressed, for the most part, along the lines of its usual endeavors. As with any 
hospital service, there is always a certain amount of routine work; and for us 
the tonsil, adenoid, and mastoid cases comprise the great bulk of our admissions. 
One definite advance of treatment, which is the result of rapidly increasing strides 
made in the field of chemotherapy, has been in the care of cases of acute mas- 
toiditis. During the last four months of the year, we have been conducting com- 
parative studies on cases treated by the usual standard methods and those 
treated by a newer technique, which utilizes our steadily improving knowledge 
of the sulfonamide drugs. As yet, our results are not ready for publication, but 
we have definite evidence that in most cases we can reduce by 50 per cent the 
convalescent period of mastoid patients so treated. This is an important factor, 
not only as regards the individual patient, but also from a general economic 
point of view. As this type of case ordinarily remains in the hospital for a rela- 
tively long period, the considerably shortened stay means a definite financial 
benefit to the individual and to the hospital as well. It also means an increased 
turn-over of cases, with a greater facility for treating a larger number of patients, 
many of whom of necessity had to be referred to other institutions. This work 
has been of such general interest that we have been honored by personal visits 
of the chiefs of service of two leading Boston hospitals, who were pleased with 
our results and planned to try the newer method for themselves. 

Through the generosity of the hospital, the addition to our Service of two 
important pieces of apparatus has increased the efficiency of our work. With 
our new 1941 Maico audiometer, we are now able to carry out a much more satis- 
factory study of cases of deafness. This is of tremendous importance, as it is 
only by discovering early cases of deafness, coupled with the prompt institution 
of appropriate treatment, that we are able to save many children from severely 
handicapped lives. The other instrument which has been added to our equip- 
ment is the electric nasopharyngoscope, which is also utilized in the study of 
deafness. 

In order to do satisfactory hearing tests, however, we should have a sound- 
proof room for this equipment. Plans for this room, as well as for the improve- 
ment of our operating suite and office layout, have been carefully considered, 
but of necessity had to be postponed "for the duration." There is no doubt 
but that our Out-Patient Department is in dire need of remodeling, and we do 
not have sufficient equipment for a satisfactory ear, nose and throat examina- 
tion. However, these plans must now be relegated to a minor position as the 
defense program progresses. 

The teaching has continued somewhat as during previous years. Each one 
of six separate sections of the third-year class of Harvard Medical students is 
given two didactic lectures and two informal sessions of ward teaching. In this 
program we have tried to stress several of the ear, nose and throat problems per- 
taining more especially to children. This should supplement the instruction 
in otolaryngology which is given at the School and at the Eye and Ear Infirmary. 

From January 1 to July 1, Dr. Wayne Y. H. Ho of Shanghai, China was our 
resident. On July 1, Dr. Charles A. Tucker came to us from the Peter Bent 

94 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Brigham Hospital, for a one-year appointment. We are very fortunate in having 
Dr. Tucker with us at this time, as he has generously consented to stay beyond 
his regular appointment during this current period of crisis. Under present 
circumstances, our interne staff now changes every month, which means that each 
individual man obtains relatively little actual experience. It is, therefore, more 
important than ever to have a resident remain for at least a year. We are doing 
our best to keep up the work of the Service, and frequent changes of personnel 
always create difficult problems. 

Dr. Carlyle G. Flake, chief of the Service, has been called to active duty with 
the U. S. Army, General Hospital No. 5, effective early in 1942. This is a great 
loss to the Service and we trust that his absence will not be for long. We are proud 
to have our Service represented in the Hospital Unit. In the meantime, we shall 
attempt to carry on the work which Dr. Flake has been doing, and look forward 
to his early return. 

CHARLES F. FERGUSON, M.D. 



THROAT OPERATING ROOM REPORT 

1941 

Operations on Nose and Accessory Sinuses 

Plastic to nose 1 

Removal of foreign body in nose 1 

Reduction of fractured nose 2 

Ethmoidectomy 3 

Ethmoidectomy, radical 1 

Antrotomy 4 

Removal of nasal spur 1 

Nasal polypectomy 1 

Exploration frontal sinus 1 

Trephine frontal sinus 1 

Removal of maxillary tumor 1 

Antrum irrigations 5 

Submucous resection 8 

Incision and drainage of orbital abscess 1 



31 



Operations on Pharynx and Nasopharynx 

Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy (Ward and Private ) . 

Adenoidectomy (Ward and Private) 

Bleeders (Ward and Private) 

Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy (Clinic) 

Adenoidectomy (Clinic) 

Bleeders (Clinic) 

Incision and drainage of retropharyngeal abscess 

Exploration of the retropharyngeal space 

Incision and drainage of peritonsillar abscess 

Removal of foreign body in pharynx 

Nasopharyngoscopy 

Nasopharyngoscopy with removal of adenoids 



193 

39 

3 

447 
40 
6 
5 
1 
1 
1 
3 
3 



742 



OTOLARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 



95 



Operations on Larynx and Trachea 

Laryngoscopy 26 

Removal of foreign body in larynx 1 

Excision of laryngeal papilloma 2 

Incision of laryngeal cyst 1 

Laryngoscopy with excision of cyst 11 

Laryngoscopy with insertion of core mold 3 

Laryngeal dilatation 10 

Tracheotomy 10 

Operations on the Esophagus and Bronchus 

Esophagoscopy 7 

Esophagoscopy with removal of foreign body 11 

Esophagoscopy with injection of varicosities 6 

Esophageal dilatation 23 

Bronchoscopy 13 

Bronchoscopy wity lipiodol injection 43 

Bronchoscopy with removal of foreign body 8 



Operations on the Ears 

Mastoidectomy — simple (post-aural ) 73 

Mastoidectomy— simple (endaural) 21 

Mastoidectomy — radical 2 

Repair of mastoid fistula 2 

Revision of mastoidectomy 3 



Operations, Miscellaneous 

Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy and circumcision 1 

Plastic to lingual frenulum 1 

Lysis of lingual adhesions 1 

Manipulation and plasters 1 



64 



111 



101 



4 



Total number of operations 1,053 

THROAT DISEASES TREATED IN THE WARDS 

1941 

Diseases of the Nose and Accessory Sinuses New Old 

Deflation of septum 12 2 

Epistaxis 3 

Ethmoiditis, acute 4 

Foreign body in nostril 1 

Fracture of nasal bone 4 1 

Furuncle of nostril 3 

Osteoma, maxillary sinus 1 

Polyp, nasal 2 

Rhinitis 3 

Sinustis 18 1 



51 4 

96 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases of the Pharynx and Nasopharynx 

Atresia, nasopharyngeal, partial 

Foreign body in hypopharynx 

Hemorrhage, nasopharyngeal 

Hemorrhage, post-operative tonsillectomy and adenoidec- 

tomy bleeding 

Hypertrophied adenoids 

Hypertrophied tonsils and adenoids 

Nasopharyngitis 

Pharyngitis 



Diseases of the Ear 

Cholesteatoma 

Deafness 

Fistula, mastoid 

Mastoiditis 

Otitis media 

Thrombosis, lateral sinus. 



1 


1 


1 




1 




19 




55 




577 


2 


3 




14 





671 



1 




2 


1 




1 


105 


7 


148 


22 


2 





259 31 



Diseases of the Larynx and Trachea 

Anomaly of aryteno-epiglottic fold 5 

Laryngitis 10 

Laryngo-tra heitis, acute 16 

Laryngo-tracheo-bronchitis, acute 7 

Obstruction, laryngeal 2 

Papilloma, larynx 

Stenosis of larynx 1 

Stenosis of trachea 1 

Stridor, laryngeal 6 

Tumor of larynx 1 



49 



Diseases of the Esophagus and Bronchus 

Atelectasis 5 1 

Bronchiectasis 6 1 

Bronchitis 6 1 

Deformity of bronchus 1 

Foreign body in bronchus 4 

Foreign body in esophagus 9 1 

Stricture, esophageal 2 12 

Varices, esophageal 2 



33 18 

OTOLARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 97 



Diseases, Miscellaneous 

Abscesses 

Adhesions, preputial 

Alopecia aerata 

Angina, Ludwig's 

Ankyloglossia 

Aplasia of arm 

Asthma 

Burn, lip and tongue 

Cellulitis 

Cleft palate 

Common cold 

Congenital heart disease 

Croup 

Cyst, buccal membrane 

Cyst, orbit 

Cyst, vallecula 

Deficiency, mental 

Dental caries 

Diphtheria 

Drug reaction 

Feeding problem in childhood 

Glossitis 

Granuloma, pelvis 

Hairy nevus of back 

Harelip and cleft palate 

Hemophilia 

Hernia 

Herniation of lung into neck 

Hoarseness 

Hyperplasia of mandible 

Hypospadias 

Ichthyosis 

Laceration 

Leukemia 

Lymphadenitis 13 

Macroglossia 

Marasmus 

Measles 

Micrognathia 

Nephritis 

No disease 

Paralysis, facial, transient 

Paralysis, post-poliomyelitis 

Paronychia 

Persistent second lingual frenulum 

- Phimosis 

Pneumonia 

Pneumonitis 

Polydactylism 



98 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases, Miscellaneous — (Continued) 

Post-operative tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy fever 7 

Prematurity 1 

Pylorospasm 1 

Pyrexia 1 

Rickets , 2 

Scarlet fever 3 

Scoliosis 

Seborrhea capitis 1 

Strabismus 1 

Syphilis 1 

Thyroid, probably enlarged substernal 

Tuberculin reactor 1 

Tuberculosis 1 

Vincent's infection of gums 1 

Webbed toes 1 

Wringer arm 



130 15 

Number of cases on Throat Ward 879 

Number of cases on Private Ward 677 

Total 1,556 

New Cases 1,193 

Secondary Diagnosis 78 

Total 1,271 



THROAT OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT REPORT 

1941 

Diseases of Nose and Accessory Sinuses 

Abrasion, nose 13 

Asymmetry, nose 1 

Contusion, nose 13 

Deviated septum 18 

Epistaxis 38 

Fissure, nasal 1 

Foreign body, nose 17 

Fracture, nose 5 

Hematoma, septal 2 

Laceration, nose 2 

Obstruction, nasal 3 

Rhinitis 21 

Sinusitis 34 

Spur, cartilage of nasal septum 3 

Turbinates, hypertrophied 1 

172 



OTOLARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 99 



Diseases of Nose and Accessory Sinuses — (Continued) 

Abscess, peritonsillar 3 

Abscess, pharyngeal 1 

Adenoid tabs 1 

Adenoids, hypertrophied 42 

Foreign body, throat 2 

Laceration, tonsil 1 

Nasopharyngitis 14 

Pharyngitis 18 

Tonsillar tabs 4 

Tonsillitis 27 

Tonsils, hypertrophied 11 

Tonsils and adenoids, hypertrophied 316 



Diseases of the Ear 

Abscess, post-aural 1 

Adenitis, preauricular 1 

Adenitis, post-auricular 2 

Cerumen 22 

Eustachian tube obstruction 2 

Fistula, post-aural 1 

Foreign body, ear canal '. 9 

Furuncle, ear canal 16 

Granulation tissue in ear canal 1 

Mastoiditis 18 

Myringitis 1 

Otalgia 3 

Otitis externa 8 

Otitis media 352 

Otorrhea 1 

Polyp, ear 1 



Diseases of the Larynx and Trachea 

Laryngitis 1 

Laryngeal paralysis 1 

Tracheitis 1 

Tracheo-bronchitis 3 



Diseases of the Esophagus and Bronchus 

Bronchiectasis 3 

Bronchitis 2 

Foreign body, esophagus 2 



440 



439 



100 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases, Miscellaneous 

Abscess, alveolar 1 

Adenitis, cervical 13 

Adenitis, occipital 2 

Angina, Ludwig's 1 

Caries, dental 1 

Cellulitis 1 

Constipation 1 

Cyst, thyroglossal duct 1 

Defective speech 2 

Dehydration 1 

Dermatitis 3 

Diarrhea 1 

Ecchymosis, eye, nose 2 

Eczema 2 

Enlarged thymus 1 

Epilepsy 1 

Foreign body, gastro-intestinal tract 6 

Fungus infection 4 

Furunculosis 3 

Habit spasm 1 

Hemangioma 1 

Impetigo 1 

Keloid 1 

Macroglossia 1 

Measles 2 

Mental retardation 1 

Mumps 2 

Neuralgia 1 

Pertussis 1 

Redundant foreskin 1 

Scarlet fever 1 

Stomatitis 2 

Strabismus 1 

Upper respiratory infection 35 



Eloped 3 

Deferred 12 

No disease 38 

Not seen 2 



99 



55 



New cases 323 

Old cases 2,363 

Transfers 693 

Total 3,379 

OTOLARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 101 



PRIVATE WARD THROAT OPERATING ROOM REPORT 

1941 

Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy 556 

Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy and laryngoscopy 1 

Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy and removal of turbinates ... 1 
Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy with catheterization of 

eustachian tubes 1 

Tonsillectomy 7 

Adenoidectomy 42 

Adenoidectomy with paracentesis 2 

Adenoidectomy with cauterization of turbinates 2 

Adenoidectomy with laryngoscopy 1 

Adenoidectomy with tenotomy 1 

Adenoidectomy with removal of tonsil tabs 1 

Mastoidectomy 33 

Reduction of fractured nose 3 

Incision and drainage, retropharyngeal abscess 2 

Incision and drainage, post-aural abscess 3 

Bronchoscopy 5 

Post-operative suturing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy 2 

Tracheotomy 1 

Esophagoscopy 4 

Reduction of fracture, middle turbinate 1 

Antrum puncture and irrigation 1 

Laryngoscopy 4 

Submucous resection 2 

Submucous resection, partial, with removal of adenoid and tonsil 

tabs 1 

Cauterization of nose 2 

Exploration of jugular vein 1 

Post-operative adenoid bleeding 3 

Spontaneous post-nasal bleeding 1 

Tenotomy 2 

Removal aural polyps 1 

Incision and drainage of cervical adenitis 1 

Excision, cyst of lid 1 

Total number of operations 689 



REPORT OF THE ORTHODONTIA AND 
DENTAL DEPARTMENTS 

THE Orthodontia and Dental Departments of the hospital continue to grow in 
their personnel and scope of work, and next year's report will contain details 
regarding expansion of space, and I hope a further expansion of personnel. 

During the past year the staff of the clinic was increased by three new mem- 
bers: Dr. Paul Gilpatrick, General Dentistry; Dr. Henry Beebe, Orthodontist; 
and Mrs. Mitton, Chair Assistant. 



102 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



One of the department's big problems has been to obtain adequate general 
dental care, fillings, extractions, etc., for the cleft palate child. However, this 
problem was solved when Dr. Paul Gilpatrick joined the staff late in 1940. 

Dr. Gilpatrick is rapidly catching up with the caries in the mouths of children 
receiving orthodontic treatment, and in a short time all the children will present 
a clean bill of dental health. 

In September 1941, Dr. Henry Beebe, an orthodontist, joined the staff, 
which of course, allows us to accept more children for orthodontic treatment. 

With the addition of Dr. Beebe to the staff the department was faced with 
the problem of four operators, one interne, and only three dental chairs. 

One solution of the problem was for part of the operators to work on alternate 
days. Since co-operation and general consultation regarding procedures of treat- 
ment produce the best results, the only solution of the problem was to obtain 
additional funds with which to purchase more dental equipment, more space, 
and thus keep all the operators in attendance on the same day. 

This problem was presented to Ex-Governor Huntley Spaulding of New 
Hampshire and through his generous gift of $1000 received in November 1941, 
the department will be able to accomplish this desired expansion, details of which 
will appear in the 1942 report. 

The Clinic was visited by a committee from the Public Health Department 
of the State of Connecticut, seeking advice and assistance regarding procedures 
they should adopt in establishing a similar service in the State of Connecticut. 

Also, Dr. Walter Ellis representing the State of New York, Buffalo District, 
sought the Departments assistance in establishing a clinic for the orthodontic 
treatment of children having a cleft palate. 

The material and facilities for dental and orthodontic research at the hospital 
are unlimited, but almost wholly untouched due to a complete lack of funds to 
properly pursue such research. 

Ways and means should be found somewhere, and soon, to take full advan- 
tage of the opportunity presented to advance the knowledge of dental ill health 
for the benefit of all concerned. 

Miss Segal's service in speech training is eagerly accepted by the patients 
and parents, and she now gives two mornings a week to the hospital. 

Total number of visits for speech correction 220 

Number of new patients 14 

Total of active cases 29 

Total number of visits for orthodontia 579 

Total failed to keep appointments 181 

New cases for active treatment 8 

Total of active cases, which varies from month to month 

approximates 65 

In addition a number of children are under observation and report to the 
clinic once or twice a year for examination. 

HARRY W. PERKINS, D.M.D. 
OTOLARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 103 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STOMATOLOGY 

THE clinical activities of this department have included, as in the past, the 
routine dental care of patients, particularly those remaining in the hospital over 
long periods. The orthopedic ward has received particular attention. Consulta- 
tion service for all divisions of the hospital including the out-patient department 
has been more extensive than in past years. Assistance has been given in the 
surgical treatment of congenital malformations, infections, and neoplastic 
processes involving the jaws. The designing and building of prosthetic appli- 
ances to restore lost function and to improve the apeparance of these child 
patients has been undertaken to a greater extent than formerly. 

The research activities of the department have centered about a continuing 
study of the growth and development of the jaws and teeth and with the effects 
of various diseases on these processes. This project has been greatly aided by 
the co-operation of the Department of Pathology. A report, "Natural Vital 
Staining of Human Teeth," was published during the year.* This work was 
being developed further by Dr. Maurice Dinnerman at the time he was called 
into service with Base Hospital No. 5. Dr. Herman De Wilde has been studying 
the tooth germs in congenital syphilis, and Dr. Charles Campelia is preparing 
for publication a report on primary carcinoma involving the mandible and 
tooth germs. 

PAUL E. BOYLE, D.M.D. 
*Am. J. Orthodontics & Oral Surg. 27: 377, 1941. 

STATISTICAL REPORT 
Statistical Report 

Consultations, O.P.D 62 

Consultations, house 76 

Cases for clinical study 20 

Restorations (metal fillings in teeth ) 53 

Dental treatments 164 

Extractions, secondary teeth 22 

Extractions, primary teeth 53 

Extractions under general anesthesia 13 

Prophylactic cleanings 29 

Dental x-ray films 234 

Corrective appliances 8 

Follow-up examinations 88 

Stomatitis treatment 15 



REPORT OF THE BACTERIOLOGY LABORATORY 

PERFORCE of necessity, the personnel of the Bacteriology Laboratory was 
reorganized during 1941. The head technician, Miss Marian Sweet, left because 
of illness, and the demands of the national emergency placed the services and 
training of the two house officers appointed to the laboratory for periods of six 
months to one year in the luxury class. Their places were well taken by Mrs. 
Helen Foley and Mrs. Margaret Wolf. In addition to two medical students, 

104 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Mr. David Speer and Mr. Arthur Graves, alternated in covering the laboratory 
needs of the Hospital from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 a.m. and on holidays. 

An effort was made to simplify the work of the laboratory and to reduce 
certain analyses to the minimum required for a thorough understanding of the 
patients' illness. This effort met with appreciable success. The total number 
of analyses fell off 24 per cent in 1941 from the previous all-time high of 1940. 
The decline resulted in part from greater familiarity and success with chemothera- 
peutic drugs and in part from conscientious efforts by the physicians to reduce 
the number of requisitions. Only two items showed an increase, that of blood 
groupings and Hinton tests on the blood of donors. 

It is earnestly hoped that when peace returns, the laboratory will once 
more be able to secure the services of recent graduates of medical schools for 
routine and research work, preparatory to clinical duties on the wards of the 
Hospital. We have in the past been unusually fortunate in securing men of 
ability whose ideas were a never-ending source of stimulation to progress. The 
benefit of their laboratory experience has been invariably in evidence in their work 
on the wards. 

JOHN A. V. DA VIES, M.D. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BACTERIOLOGY LABORATORY 
For the year ended December 31, 1941 
Cultures from 

Blood 799 

Spinal fluid 938 

Surgical and miscellaneous specimens 4,367 

Feces 527 

Urine 1,157 

Guinea pig inoculations 121 

Aggulinations 104 

Pneumonoccus typing 33 

8,046 

Clinical Pathology 

Routine urine 2,917 

Blood 

Hemoglobin estimation 1,330 

Red cell counts 1,484 

White cell counts 2,399 

Differential counts 1,160 

Bleeding time estimation 24 

Clotting time estimation 25 

Blood groupings 525 

Hinton tests 941 

Spinal fluid examinations 100 

Feces examinations 26 

Electrocardiograms 457 

Basal metabolism tests 71 

Sedimentation rates 283 

Miscellaneous 11 

11,753 

Total examinations 19,799 

ROENTGENOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 105 



REPORT OF THE ROENTGENOLOGICAL 

DEPARTMENT 

THE year 1941 has witnessed several changes in the Department of Roent- 
genology. Dr. George M. Wyatt, Roentgenologist to the Hospital since 1939, 
whose interest and enthusiasm has been responsible for many of the recent ad- 
vances and improvements in the department tendered his resignation so that 
he might enter the private practice of Radiology. Dr. Edward B. D. Neuhauser, 
formerly of the Hospital and Medical School of the University of Pennsylvania 
has been appointed to succeed him. 

A modern X-ray therapy machine has been installed to replace an outmoded 
and inefficient one. This new unit is highly flexible and as it is designed to operate 
at 200,000 volts is an effective weapon against the deep seated tumors that are 
unfortunately all too common in children. The department now has facilities 
to administer Roentgen therapy to all types of lesions from the most superficial 
wart to the most deeply placed intracranial or abdominal tumor. During the 
past year almost 150 more treatments were given than in 1940 and we feel that 
each treatment has been a more effective one. 

Every effort is being made by the staff of the department of Roentgenology 
to reduce the cost of diagnostic examinations. By careful work on the part of 
the technicians the total number of films used during the past year has decreased 
although the total number of patient visits is again greater than the preceding 
year. 

The department continues to assist in the research problems of the hospital 
and at the same time to answer the ever increasing demand for routine diagnostic 
examination and treatment. 

EDWARD B. D. NEUHAUSER, M.D., 

Roentgenologist 



TABULATION OF PATIENTS 
Out- Patient Department 

1940 1941 

Medical 2,243 2,110 

Surgical 1,291 1,307 

Orthopedic 1,429 2,061 

Throat 171 172 



Total 5,134 5,650 

Ward 

Medical 1,134 768 

Surgical 1,212 1,079 

Orthopedic 831 983 

Throat 252 267 

Total 3,429 3,091 

106 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Infants 999 800 

Private 1,324 1,425 

Bader Building 229 249 

Isolation 59 76 

Miscellaneous 138 50 

Doctors 50 64 

Nurses 277 262 

Employees 223 307 



Total 3,299 3,233 

Total patient visits 12,470 12,725 

Total treatments 608 751 

Total diagnostic visits 11,862 11,974 

Total diagnostic examinations 14,647 14,407 

Total diagnostic exposures (films) 35,990 35,571 



REPORT OF PHYSICAL THERAPEUTICS DEPARTMENT 

THERE have been several changes and a number of difficult periods in the 
program of the Physiotherapy Department during the year. 

Arrangements have been made to care for patients from the general morning 
clinics on five days a week instead of three. This has made it possible to give 
better attention to the increased number of cases. 

The appointment system in the Scoliosis and Posture Clinic helped somewhat 
in obtaining more regular attendance from the children who were advised to 
carry out special exercise programs in order to improve their body mechanics. 
Discontinuance of follow-up correspondence has also cut down the considerable 
number of cases whose irregular attendance and lack of home co-operation made 
their occasional visits a waste of time for all concerned. The practice of applying 
temporary casts which are changed frequently, rather than using more elaborate 
and expensive apparatus, was continued for economic reasons. 

A drop from the previous year of more than 500 in the number of ultra- 
violet light treatments given was due to the dismantling of the Bader solarium 
and its replacement by a Functional Training Room for badly handicapped 
infantile paralysis cases. 

In the Fall, the number of recent polio cases on the wards taxed the facilities 
of the department to the uttermost. 

Increased use of hot packs in the early stages of the disease, the number of 
cases for daily pool treatment, and the length of time required for removal of 
splints and treatment, made it impossible to give each individual as much at- 
tention as is advocated in the new methods of physiotherapy treatment. How- 
ever, the actual number of pool treatments given to house patients was consid- 
erably higher than in 1940. 

The staff was further handicapped by a shortage of experienced student 
workers at the time when their assistance was most needed. 

Co-operation of the department in the Boston Emergency Defense Course 
for training physiotherapy aides for service in Army hospitals, resulted in an 
entire change of schedules for the physiotherapy students from Harvard Medical 
School. A condensed curriculum in six months instead of nine, and the necessity 

THERAPEUTIC DEPARTMENT 107 



for a joint program with a similar group of students at Sargent College, made it 
impossible to depend on assistance from them for several months in the Fall. 
This situation will continue to cause difficulty as long as these Emergency- 
courses are in progress. 

The spring and summer courses were given as usual, and included four 
scholarship nurses from the National Organization of Public Health Nursing. 

Extensive repairs were made to the filter system of the pool during the 
summer. 

Massage courses were given to classes in the Training School for Nurses 
and in return courses in bandaging and minor dressings were given the physio- 
therapy students by the School of Nursing staff. 

JANET B. MERRILL 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY 

1941 



General Light 

P.T. Therapy Pool 

Hospital Wards Cases Cases Cases 

Orthopedic 120 5 37 

Surgical 7 5 

Medical 32 1 

Neuro-Surgical 4 2 

Neurological 1 1 

Private 10 1 6 

Infants' Hospital 3 

Staff 1 5 

Isolation 5 

Throat 1 

Training School 11 2 

Employee 2 



STATISTICS 



O. P. D. 

H. I. P. C 

Private 

O. P. D. 

Orthopedic 

Arthritis 

Surgical 

Private 

Neuro-Surgical . 

Medical 

Scoliosis 

H. I. P. C 

Neurological. . . . 



29 

5 

34 



241 

20 

12 

2 

1 

2 

299 

864 

207 



P.T. 


Light 


Pool 




Treat- 


Treat- 


Treat- 




ments 


ments 


ments 


Total 


3,446 


18 


2,379 


5,843 


125 


143 





268 


332 





1 


333 


12 


20 





32 


1 


15 





16 


55 


3 


332 


390 


8 








8 


3 


61 





64 


103 








103 


12 








12 


75 


8 





83 


20 








29 



197 21 44 4,192 268 2,712 7,181 



731 
153 

884 



1,648 



2,713 

33 

50 

16 

50 

2 

2,229 

4,916 

3,453 

13,462 



108 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



DISEASES RECEIVING PHYSICAL THERAPY 
1941 

I. Congenital Malformations O.P.D. 

Anomalies 10 

Arthrogryposis 1 

Chest deformity 1 

Cavus foot 

Club feet 16 

Deformed foot 

Dislocation of hips 29 

Kyphos 1 

Spina Bifida 8 

Sprengel's deformity 4 

Scoliosis 31 

Torticollis 44 

II. Deformities and Disabilities Following 
Injury or Disease 

Claw foot 1 

Coxa plana 

Coxa vara 1 

Dislocations, sprains, injuries 10 

Flat feet 1 

Fractures 7 

Peroneal spasm 

Posture 2 

Pronated feet 5 

Rickets 2 

Scoliosis — functional 233 

Scoliosis — structural 35 

Slipped epiphysis 

Tight posterior structures 2 

III. Non-tuberculosis Infections 

Arthritis 26 

Osteomyelitis 3 

Septic joints 5 

IV. Paralysis and Other Neuro-muscular Diseases 

Amyotonia 1 

Brain tumor 

Dystrophies 10 

Hydrocephalus 

Paralysis — athetoid 1 

Paralysis — brachial 26 

Paralysis — cord lesion 4 

Paralysis — meningocele 5 

Paralysis — peripheral nerve 6 

Paralysis — plumbism 1 

Paralysis — spastic 3 



House Adult 
7 
1 

2 
4 
1 
5 

5 
1 
1 

7 



5 

3 11 

2 2 

1 

1 



THERAPEUTIC DEPARTMENT 



109 



Paralysis, Volkmann's 3 

Poliomyelitis, anterior 4 45 

Poliomyelitis, anterior, post-operative 18 

Pneumococcus Meningitis 2 

Miscellaneous 

Acne 1 

Arteritis 1 

Bronchial Infiltration 1 

Colitis 1 

Diabetes 3 

Diagnosis deferred 36 3 

Ductus arteriosus 1 

Fatigue 3 

Hemophilia 1 

Intestinal obstruction 1 

Nutritional 1 

Obesity 1 

Rheumatic fever 1 

Scleroderma 1 

Sinusitis 1 

Skin lesions 1 

Ulcer 1 



578 171 21 



REPORT OF THE MUSCLE TRAINING CLINIC 

FOR the year ended December 31, 1941, 51 new patients were admitted to the 
Muscle Training Clinic for treatment. Three patients were transferred to other 
hospitals because of age. The remainder were diagnosed as follows: 

Brachial Palsy 11 

Cerebral Palsy 32 

Facial Palsy 3 

Cord Injury 1 

Hydrocephalus 1 

Miscellaneous 3 

51 
- A total of 3,443 treatments were given to patients previously admitted. 

RANDOLPH K. BYERS, M.D. 

110 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



HARVARD INFANTILE PARALYSIS COMMISSION 

THIS marks the 25th year in the life of the Harvard Infantile Paralysis Com- 
mission and there was no lessening in its activities. Although infantile paralysis 
did not reach epidemic proportions in Massachusetts, there were more cases in 
the Commonwealth this year than the total of the three preceding years. 

The Central Clinic for After Care continues to be held three mornings a 
week at the Children's Hospital. During 1941 nearly 6000 treatments and 
examinations were given in this Clinic. The Field Clinics which supplement 
this work are held according to a regular schedule in Arlington, Beverly, Dedham, 
East Boston, Haverhill, Lawrence, Lowell, Maiden, Quincy, Somerville and 
Waltham. In these units more than 4000 treatments were given during 1941. 

The Orthopedic Nurses of the Community Health Association, working 
under orders from the Clinic Surgeon, gave more than 2500 treatments to clinic 
patients resident in greater Boston and materially aided the continuity of treat- 
ment. These nurses visit the Clinic with their patients at regular intervals for 
supervised direction and in many instances they go into the homes of patients 
to carry out treatment. This close co-operation has marked benefits, especially 
for the patients. 

During the year the Functional Training Room was completed. It is being 
used more and more in treatment and the results are most gratifying. Much 
energy over the years has been used in an attempt to return power to muscles 
long after the possibility of such a return is past. Today in this stage we are 
placing emphasis upon functional training, teaching the patients to "do things" 
in spite of their paralysis. The fact that individuals remain quite extensively 
paralyzed after infantile paralysis does not condemn them to hopeless invalidism. 
An example of what may be accomplished in this field is the case of a patient with 
extensive involvement of her arms, trunk, and legs following her initial paralysis 
in 1937. Two years ago a threshold between two rooms was an insurmountable 
object. This girl is now able to ascend and descend a flight of steps. This 
change is dependent not upon improvement in muscle power, but in training her 
to use the few muscles which remain. 

This has been a year of controversial ideas with regard to therapy in infantile 
paralysis. Much confusion has arisen; most of it could have been avoided. We 
believe that the diversity of ideas is more apparent than real. The After Care 
Clinic of the Commission has always looked with critical interest and open- 
mindedness upon all new ideas, while endeavoring to adopt those which are 
worthwhile. 

The activities of the Clinic are more and more directed toward investigative 
work. A study which is concerned with the effects of infantile paralysis upon 
growth has been continued during the present year. This work has been sup- 
ported in part by a grant from the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. 
Dr. Norman Nelson, a recent graduate of the Harvard School of Public Health, 
has been associated with us in carrying on a statistical study involving the data 
accumulated in the Clinic. Miss Florence Kenney, one of our physiotherapists 
has been temporarily transferred to assist in this study. This project has been 
supported by the Bureau of the Services for Crippled Children and has been 
arranged with the collaboration of Dr. Edwin D. Wilson and Dr. Edward G. 
Huber of the Harvard School of Public Health. 

Dr. Charles Sturdevant, who finished his residency in the Orthopedic Service 

HARVARD INFANTILE PARALYSIS COMMISSION 111 



at the Children's Hospital in September 1941, was appointed Assistant to the 
Director of the Clinic to succeed Dr. Leo J. McDermott, who finished his service 
with us at that time and is now in practice in Portland, Maine. 

The Clinic continues to serve as a teaching unit for House Officers, graduate 
and undergraduate medical students, as well as physical therapy students. 

We extend our sincere appreciation to Noemi No. 11, U.O.T.S. for their 
magnificent effort in support of the Functional Training Room, as well as their 
aid in providing apparatus and transportation for patients who are not fortunate 
enough to be able to provide their own. 

The Commission greatly appreciates the co-operation and support of those 
communities in which Field Clinics are held and wishes to thank the individuals 
and organizations who contribute so generously of their time and funds that the 
necessary apparatus and transportation may be provided for the needy patients 
in their respective communities. 

The splendid spirit of co-operation which has always existed between the 
personnel of the Children's Hospital and the Clinic continues to be a factor 
in the daily routine. 

WILLIAM T. GREEN, M.D., 

Director of Clinics 

HARVARD INFANTILE PARALYSIS COMMISSION 
1941 

Number of regular Clinics held at the Children's Hospital 150 

Number of Doctor Clinics held in outside cities 4 

Total 154 



Number of visits made to the Children's Hospital Clinics 5,647 

Number of old cases seen at the Doctor Clinics in outside cities 166 

Number of visits made in the Field by Commission workers. . . . 4,106 

Number of new cases seen at the Children's Hospital Clinics. . . 65 



Total 9,984 

Number of visits, co-operative therapy, Community Health Association 2,544 

Average attendance at Hospital Clinics 38 

Pool treatments 731 

Total number of individual cases seen 945 

Total number of individual cases seen at the Children's Hospital 864 

Number of individual cases treated in the Pool 29 

Number of cases operated upon in the Children's Hospital 44 



DEPARTMENT OF PHOTOGRAPHY ANNUAL REPORT 

THE volume of photographs produced by this Department was about the 
same as last year. 

The making of photostatic copies of records consumes a considerable portion 
of time, as the department has no proper facilities for washing and drying large 
sheets of sensitized paper. If the future demand does not exceed this year's 
total production, it can be taken care of without additional apparatus. 

112 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Due to the scarcity of materials, nothing more will be done about new 
lighting equipment, patterned after the Edgerton High Speed Lamp, until after 
the war. 

There is as yet no scarcity of photographic material, and none is expected 
in the near future. The cost of sensitized materials rose, due to new taxes, but 
before this went into effect, about six months' normal supply was purchased. 

The new method of photographing the plantar aspect of feet, mentioned in 
last year's Annual Report, is in steady use and is being copied by other institutions. 

Late in the year the Department took over from the Scoliosis Clinic all func- 
tional scoliosis posture photography. This will result in a considerable increase 
in the number of patients passing through the Department. 

In September the Photographer attended the Convention of the Biological 
Photographic Association in Buffalo, New York. A paper on the new foot 
photography apparatus was read and photographs of gross pathological specimens 
were exhibited. Exhibits were also presented at the Conventions of the American 
College of Surgeons and the American Academy of Pediatrids. Several other 
exhibits were prepared for various departments of the Hospital. 

Papers written during 1941 were as follows: 
"Reproduction of Radiographs." Jour. Biol. Photo. Assn. Vol. 9 No. 3. 
"Photography of the Plantar Aspect of the Feet with Weight Bearing." To be 

published. 

FERDINAND R. HARDING 

DEPARTMENT OF PHOTOGRAPHY ANNUAL REPORT 
1941 STATISTICS 

Service Cases Views 

Orthopedic 483 1,182 

Surgical 468 1,218 

Medical 93 200 

Infants' Hospital 48 115 

Pathology — Infants' Hospital 83 155 

Pathology — Children's Hospital 308 601 

Scoliosis Clinic 57 223 

Harvard Infantile Paralysis Commission 159 476 

Private Ward 41 86 

Ward 6 10 20 

Ward 9 7 19 

Dental Clinic 6 18 

School of Nursing 5 32 

Director's Office 5 11 

Ward 11 2 3 

Muscle Training Clinic 1 2 

Total 1,776 4,360 

Miscellaneous negatives made 998 

Miscellaneous prints made 2,010 

Lantern slides made 464 

Color slides made 61 

Motion pictures 62 

PHOTOGRAPHIC DEPARTMENT 113 



Motion picture footage 2,000 ft. 

Photostats — School of Nursing 196 

Photostats — Administration 2,069 

Charge slips $1,285.75 

Cost of supplies 823.73 

For Scoliosis Clinic — 25 packs developed, 293 prints made 

Total negative made 5,358 

Total prints made 6,663 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY YEARLY REPORT 

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY has become a vital and integral part of the 
child's convalescent program, in helping promote and secure a more normal 
state of mind and body. 

This year 1224 children throughout the Hospital were given Occupational 
Therapy. In addition, recreation and story hours were provided. 

The cost of supplies was $78.30. An average of about six cents per child 
per year. It has been possible to keep this figure low because of the splendid 
variety and quality of donations which have been sent to the department. 

Twenty-eight students affiliating from the Boston School of Occupational 
Therapy contributed 6156 hours. The period of training for each student was 
six weeks. 

One hundred and seven volunteers contributed 4654 hours. This gives a 
grand total of 10,810 hours of volunteer service. It has been a most valuable 
asset. The vounteers represent : The Junior League, Wheelock School of Kinder- 
garten, Garland School, Boston University, Wellesley College and the Boston 
School of Occupational Therapy. Many others came because of their desire 
to be of service. These volunteers have helped in preparation of work and in 
the Occupational Therapy on the wards. 

Forty-eight hours were devoted to a course in Occupational Therapy given 
to second year Children's Hospital nurses. Four groups received 12 hours each. 
The course consists of lecture, craft, library service and ward assignments in 
Occupational Therapy with the children. The total number attending was 55. 

Each affiliating group of nurses receives a one hour lecture on Occupational 
Therapy and its relation to "Child Growth and the Normal Child." Eight hours 
was devoted to these lectures. The total attendance was 295. 

The library service is in charge of a volunteer who has had library training. 
She is assisted by Occupational Therapy Students. We have been able, because 
of the many beautiful books given the Hospital, to practically renovate our 
Children's Library. It is in excellent condition. We have on the shelves over 
2000 books, all of which have been carefully graded and catalogued. The children 
are taught the care of books and encouraged in their reading, and helped with 
intelligent book selection. There was a circulation in 1941 of approximately 
2800 books. The number of books lost was only 40. 

It has been a busy and interesting year. The Occupational Therapy De- 
partment extends its sincere thanks to the Welfare Committee, to the Occupa- 
tional Therapy Committee and members of the Staff for their continued loyalty 
and whole-hearted support. 

JESSIE NESS, O.T.R., 

114 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



REPORT OF THE SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

IN going over the old Social Service reports from 1917 to the present time, it is 
interesting to see the volution of certain trends which have crystallized in the 
policies and procedures in the Department for 1941. Although there has been 
some fluctuation in the numbers of the Staff during the last 24 years, the general 
trend has been an increase of workers from the beginning when there was one 
worker and a director until recently when the maximum of six staff members 
and a director has been reached. Also, after a rather high turnover in personnel, 
the Staff reached relative stability in 1940 which continued throughout 1941, 
although in January Mrs. Evelyn Karp resigned to enter private life. Her place 
was filled by Miss Mary Deenihan, a recent graduate of the Boston College 
School of Social Work, who came to us in October, the intervening vacancy having 
been filled on a temporary basis by Mrs. Elizabeth Laurence. 

Although volunteers have always been generous of their time and effort in 
help to our Department, we are especially indebted to Miss Louise Horwood, a 
student from Bryn Mawr College and to Miss Kathleen Scott, a student at the 
Simmons College School of Social Work, both of whom gave almost full time 
volunteer assistance during the summer months during a period when the Staff 
was depleted because of vacations and when extra work due to camp arrangements 
fell upon us. 

During this last year further steps were taken to turn over to the Adminis- 
tration more and more of the routines of clinic management, preliminary follow- 
up, medical reports and other functions formerly carried by the Social Service 
but more appropriately coming under the general hospital management. Along 
these same lines, in July 1941, the School of Nursing took over the responsibility 
of sending out the nursing orders to the Community Health Associations of Bos- 
ton and of surrounding cities and towns for those patients who upon discharge 
from the Wards or after Out-Patient Department visits, needed nursing care in 
their own homes. Although in general the Social Service Department is the 
logical channel for dealing with outside community agencies, the Nursing group 
seems a more suitable one to make this particular contact with their own profes- 
sional colleagues. 

Our teaching program for student nurses has been similar to that of other 
years. Every two weeks throughout the year a different student nurse comes to 
the Department for a period of experience in home visiting. The Staff has given 
three courses of ten lectures each to three groups of student nurses on the general 
topic of Social Problems, trying to orient the material to a focus which seems most 
pertinent and useful to the nurse functioning in her own professional field. 
Aside from this more formal teaching, informal case discussions have been given 
from time to time on the Wards. Our program for teaching our own students 
in Social Work has expanded so that this year we took for field work three 
"Masters" students from the Simmons College School of Social Work and one 
from the Boston University School of Social Work. Also, the worker on the 
Neurological Service has had some responsibility in presenting the social and 
emotional needs of patients in the program of teaching the medical students. 

Although in earlier years the Social Service Department took considerable 
initiative in selecting those situations which seemed to require its particular 
service, during this last year the responsibility has been left almost entirely 
with the physicians to choose those cases needing Social Service help, a method 

SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT 115 



which reduces the case load to possible limits for the existent Staff and which 
seems to make for better integration of the treatment of medical and social 
problems. 

This last summer we concentrated on obtaining greater efficiency and 
more discrimination in the camp placement of children referred for some sort 
of camp experience because of health or some special social or emotional need. 
Various members of the Department visited a number of the camps available 
to our children and collected first-hand information in regard to the facilities, 
atmosphere, program and special features of each camp. One hundred and eight 
children were placed this last summer at a total cost of $343.33. Since some of 
the camps were willing to take our children free, and because in other instances 
the families contributed, we were able to send this large group of children at such 
a small cost. We have found camp placements for the crippled or otherwise 
handicapped child particularly difficult to arrange, largely because the com- 
munity resources for those needing restricted activity or special attention are 
practically non-existent and the ordinary camp can not integrate into their 
general program the child with exceptional needs. 

One of our outstanding and particularly difficult problems has been the 
placement or social adjustment of the mentally defective child. These children 
are brought in to the hospital in large numbers seeking some medical solution 
to their difficulties. They are referred to the Social Service Department for 
the extreme over-crowding of the State Schools for the Feebleminded. The 
mothers of many of these children because of the constant demands for special 
care and supervision, become completely worn out and have little or no time to 
devote to their other children, their household duties, of their own recreational 
needs. There is some question how much time and energy the Social Service 
Department of a hospital for acute illness should devote to the needs of feeble- 
minded children and the problems created by difficult and sometimes impossible 
home adjustments. A student from the Simmons School of Social Work made 
a study of this situation af our suggestion and wrote her "Masters" thesis on the 
cases referred by this hospital to the Wrentham State School between 1937 and 
1940. Of these 60 children referred, only nine were admitted during this three 
year period. 

This fall when Sharon Sanatorium opened its doors to 20 more children 
suffering from rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease, the Social Worker 
in our Department who deals with the social problems of this diagnostic group, 
extended her services and interests to those children at Sharon who entered 
from this hospital and who were subsequently to return under the medical super- 
vision of our Rheumatic Fever Clinic. The extension of the facilities at Sharon 
has given us an additional resource for the placement of children who can not 
get in their own homes the prolonged bed care and medical supervision which this 
particular disease requires. 

About $1000 was available from special funds and private donations to meet 
some of financial needs for those of our patients who did not have sufficient 
resources to cover extra demands. The fund for taxi service continued to meet 
those transportation problems which the volunteer service provided by the 
Red^ Cross could not handle and the Zonta Club of Boston again contributed a 
sum of money to pay for an occupational therapist to visit one day a week in 
the homes of a few of our children. Mrs. Robert Simpson in this capacity gave 
efficient and loyal service. 

116 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



During the last year 1115 patients have received Social Service help, each 
case varying in intensity according to the need, and in length of time all the 
way from a few contacts during one month's period to those cases requiring 
consistent and prolonged help throughout the entire year. About 1600 addi- 
tional patients have received some brief but necessary service from this De- 
partment. 

The focus of our efforts in working with these cases has been the study of 
the individual child's social situation, his personality and needs in relation to 
his medical and emotional difficulties, together with an attempt to work out with 
the doctor, patient, and family a reasonable adjustment. Now that uncertain, 
stormy days of war loom darkly ahead as part of every child's total background, 
more study, more planning, more effort may be necessary. 

MARION W. HALL 



ANNUAL REPORT OF SCHOOL OF NURSING 

AT the closing of the year 1941 there are 113 students in The Children's Hospital 
School of Nursing, 73 affiliating students, and two special graduate students. 

Graduation exercises were held in Gardner House on June 11 with an ad- 
dress given by Colonel Harold Wellington Jones, Medical Corps, United States 
Army, a former house officer of The Children's Hospital. Twenty-nine students 
were graduated. The new school diploma which is much smaller in size was used 
for this class. 

Seven students were removed from the roll during the year for the following 
reasons : 

3 did not wish to continue in nursing 
1 did not meet standards 

1 to be married 

2 because of physical condition 

Forty-three students (as against 42 in 1940) were admitted to the school, 
of whom 27 were residents of Massachusetts. In addition to the other New 
England states there are represented New York, New Jersey, Wisconsin and 
Virginia. Sixteen of these students admitted had one to four years of college, 
a gain of six per cent over 1940. The scholastic and nursing aptitude tests taken 
prior to admission showed the students distributed as to their chances of success 
in nursing as follows: 

Excellent 13 

Very good 24 

Reasonably good 6 

There have been no major changes in the curriculum. A course in sociology 
has been added which we believe will help the students to understand the social 
and economic factors which play such a large part in the problems of patients. 

Two affiliations were discontinued during the year, but the affiliating course 
has been given to 304 students as against 296 in 1940. One student was received 
from Simmons College School of Nursing this year for field experience in ward 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 117 



administration, and one graduate student completed two months' experience to 
enable her to qualify for registration in Massachusetts. The affiliations for our 
own students were as follows: 

Number of students 
sent during year 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 32 

Boston Lying-in Hospital 33 

New England Deaconess Hospital 36 

McLean Hospital 17 

Simmons College (Public Health Course) 12 

A new agreement for affiliating schools was approved by the School of Nursing 
Committee. 

There have been a number of changes in the faculty this year. Miss Isa- 
belle M. Jordan, who has been on the faculty for nine years, first, as Supervisor 
of the Infants' Hospital and for four years as Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, 
resigned as of July 1 to become superintendent of the Sharon Sanatorium for the 
care of children with rheumatic conditions. Miss Muriel B. Vesey was appointed 
ass assistant superintendent of nurses. Miss Kathryn Cheney, who was formerly 
a member of the faculty as Orthopedic Supervisor, returned to the school, after 
her course in public health nursing, as second assistant. 

The report was received of the visit for study by the representatives of the 
Committee on Accrediting of the National League of Nursing Education, and 
the school was fully accredited. This does not mean that we have reached the 
goal of a perfect school ; it does mean that the elements of strength outweighed 
the deficiencies, and the deficiencies were such that they may be corrected. 

Early in the development of the school provision was made for a faculty 
organization. With the passing of the years, although many new positions have 
been created in the School of Nursing, and there are constant references to the 
faculty, the records did not reveal that there had been any formal action, since 
the original action, as to who should have faculty status. On recommendation 
of the School of Nursing Committee, the Board of Managers voted: 

"That the faculty of the School of Nursing be defined as consisting of the 
Principal, Assistant Principal, Assistant Superintendents of Nurses, full- 
time Instructors, the Supervisors, Head Nurses in charge of specialized units 
whose experience and responsibilities warrant it, and such others as the 
Board of Managers may designate from time to time, with due consideration 
to the recommendations of this Committee." 

Following that action, the faculty organization has been strengthened, appro- 
priate committees have been appointed, and provision has been made for more 
active participation in activities of the school for all members of the instructional 
staff including head nurses who do not have faculty status. Members of our 
faculty are continuing to make personal contributions of service to the work of 
the national and state organizations. We believe that this participation is a 
decided benefit to the School of Nursing. 

Out of the 3 7 members of the administrative and instructional staff, includ- 
ing head nurses, 19 have had or are taking the Red Cross Course in First Aid. 

We have had many requests from house officers and former house officers, 

118 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



as well as other hospitals, for copies of the nursing procedures as practised in 
The Children's Hospital. For the past year members of the faculty, with the 
help of the head nurses, have been revising many of these procedures in the light 
of new scientific knowledge and with a view to simplicity and safety. The book 
has now been printed for the use of students, and there has been an encouraging 
sale of it to others. 

We always look forward to the comparison of the illness record for the 
various years in the hope that we can show a better record. This year our 
figures are encouraging as shown by the comparative figures below. 

Children's Hospital Students Affiliating Students 





Daily 


Inf. Av. Days 


Daily 


Inf. Av. Days 




Residence 


Days of Illness 


Residence 


Days of Illness 


1941 


73 


530 7.3 


78.6 


664.5 8.4 


1940 


74.5 


727 9.7 


79.2 


840 10.6 


1939 


73 


941.5 12.9 


81 


771 9.5 



While our infirmary days for students may seem high as compared with some 
other types of schools, we believe that the policy of taking students off duty 
when they show the first signs of illness or when they are fatigued is sound. 

Nursing Service 

It was inevitable with the general unrest in the community that we should 
have many changes in the general staff group and in the ward helpers' group. 
Toward the end of the year the situation has become much more acute, especially 
with the declaration of war. We have had a constant shift of personnel. At the 
close of the year there were 14 vacancies in the general duty staff and nine ward 
helpers' positions vacant; and seven graduates, including one assistant supervisor 
of the Operating Room, one Operating Room nurse in charge of the throat ser- 
vice, one anesthetist, two ward head nurses, one Out-Patient head nurse and one 
general staff nurse, were waiting orders for mobilization in the Harvard Unit. 

We are confident, however, that despite shortages in personnel and increased 
tension that the essential spirit of co-operation and loyal service will not be lack- 
ing in the nursing staff. 

Sufficient appropriation was made by the Board of Managers during the 
latter part of the year to reduce the working hours for graduate nurses on night 
duty from a seven-night week to one night off every other week. We look for- 
ward to the day when the hours for both students and graduate night nurses 
may be further reduced so that they have one night off each week. 

STELLA GOOSTRAY, 

Superintendent of Nurses, 
Principal, School of Nursing 

Children's Hospital students enrolled, January 1, 1941 108 

Admissions — Children's Hospital students 43 

151 

Completed course during year 30 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 119 



Removed from roll 

Preclinical students 1 

First-year'students 3 

Second-year students 3 



Vacancies, December 31, 1941 14 

Resignations presented 7 



7 



Temporally off enrollment — to re-enter 1 38 



Children's Hospital students enrolled, December 31, 

1941 113 

Affiliating students completing course during year. . 304 

Student Nurse Stajf, December 31, 1941 

Children's Hospital students enrolled 113 

Affiliating students enrolled 73 

Special graduate students enrolled 2 

75 

Less affiliating students on vacation 2 73 

186 



Children's Hospital students on affiliation, not in 

residence 30 

Children's Hospital students in residence but at- 
tending Simmons College 

Preclinical course 28 

Public health course 4 32 62 



Total number of students assigned to wards and 

special departments 124 

Children's Hospital 100 

Infants' Hospital 24 



Graduate Staff {Permanent), December 31, 1941 

School of Nursing Office 6 

Children's Hospital including Infirmary 

Night Supervisors 3 

Day Supervisors 4 

Head Nurses 10 

Assistant Head Nurse 1 

General Duty Nurses 183^ 

Operating rooms and anesthesia 12 

Out-Patient Department 5 

Infants' Hospital 7% 

Private Ward (3 floors open) 22 



89 



21 

68 
120 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



REPORT OF THE WELFARE COMMITTEE 

I HAVE the honor to present a report of the Welfare Committee for the year 1941. 

For the second time, the Yankee Trading Post proved most successful 
though the proceeds were not as high as the year before. We did not expect 
they would be under the existing war-time pressure. Credit again goes to Mrs. 
H. Parker Whittington as the Chairman of that committee. In 1940 the Trading 
Post raised $5,466.50 and in 1941 $3,960.00. The proceeds once more were voted 
to the William E. Ladd Chair of Surgery. 

The Avery Lectures have run slightly behind in subscribers. Mrs. Stewart 
and her Co-chairman, Miss Learned, have worked hard and unceasingly to re- 
duce the expenses, and have proved as always their interest in these lectures, the 
proceeds of which benefit us so splendidly. In July their Treasurer sent their 
donation of $5,000 to the Treasurer of the Hospital. 

The exhibit from The Children's Hospital to the Annual Meeting of the 
Massachusetts State Federation of Women's Clubs at Swampscott last May 
was greatly simplified. Mrs. Thompson took complete charge of planning and 
setting up the exhibit. 

Mrs. Whittington reports for the Occupational Therapy Committee that 
under the able direction of Miss Jessie Ness this department carried on its work 
in the same excellent manner as in the past. Members of the Welfare Com- 
mittee each month assisted the Occupational Therapy Department on the wards. 
No words can express the gratitude we all feel for the work of Miss Ness. 

The C. H. Clubs have been greatly affected by requests for raising war 
funds. Of the five existing clubs at present, the Buzzard's Bay Club was outstand- 
ing, netting the splendid sum of $744.00. Their Sports' Week was again under 
the able leadership of Miss Dorothy Rackemann. 

The Holiday Committee, under Miss Bartlett, reports that ten donations 
have been sent in representing different organizations. The sum total, however, 
is $15 less than last year. 

The Birthday Club, under Mrs. Theopold, reports the loss of a few members, 
but we still have an active membership of 805 children. 

Mrs. Beal, Chairman of the Thrift Shop Committee, reports that their 
figures show a decrease of approximately $59 this year, though the articles from 
the Yankee Trading Post proved of great help. The profits from the sale of 
goods left over from the Yankee Trading Post were credited in full to The Chil- 
dren's Hospital. 

Mrs. Clapp reports for the Girl Scout Committee that the girls have had so 
many Red Cross calls that their work has slowed up for us; but she earnestly 
hopes to get more articles soon. 

The Tea Committee under Miss Leland, we feel, has proved again most 
successful. There have been seven teas in all for different organizations visiting 
the Hospital and for the nurses. The Christmas Tea had a much larger at- 
tendance of doctors and nurses than last year. 

The Pencil Committee headed by Mrs. Howell has not been so successful 
this year. The proceeds for 1941 are $137.60 against $273.50 for 1940. 

The Knitting Committee under Mrs. Black has increased its group of knitters. 
It is an interesting fact that with all the calls for war knitting, many have vol- 
unteered their services to knit exclusively for The Children's Hospital. 

WELFARE COMMITTEE 121 



Dr. John Hubbard gave us a most interesting lecture on Rheumatic Fever, 
and Miss Marion Hall spoke to us about the function of the Social Service De- 
partment in our Hospital. 

The Welfare Committee is keeping in close touch with the work of the 
Hospital Council of Boston, and we are sending a representative to all their 
meetings. 

Since December 7, the Welfare Committee has been planning a Children's 
Hospital War Service Committee with Mrs. Harwood as Chairman. Our mem- 
bers are organized with the sincere hope that we may prove of able assistance 
to the organization of the Hospital which is facing this great emergency. • 

JOSEPHINE D. RUSSELL, 

Chairman 

MEMBERS OF THE WELFARE COMMITTEE 

January, 1941 to January, 1942 

Mrs. William E. Russell, Chairman 

Mrs. Edwin F. Cave, Vice Chairman 

Mrs. Carl H. Ernlund, Vice Chairman 

Mrs. Thomas H. Lanman, Recording Secretary 

Mrs. John G. Palfrey, Corresponding Secretary 

Mrs. John E. Lawrence, Treasurer 

Mrs. Gordon Abbott 

Mrs. Gordon Abbott, Jr. 

Mrs. Arthur W. Allen 

Mrs. Joel M. Barnes 

Miss Betty A. Bartlett 

Mrs. William De Ford Beal 

Mrs. C. Stewart Black 

Mrs. J. Lewis Bremer 

Mrs. Theodore E. Brown 

Mrs. C. Sidney Burwell 

Mrs. F. Wadsworth Busk 

Mrs. George A. Clapp 

Miss Mary Elizabeth Clarke 

Miss Louise Coburn 

Mrs. Eliot Codman 

Mrs. Lawrence Coolidge 

Mrs. Channing H. Cox 

Mrs. William C. Cox 

Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles Devens 

Mrs. Ralph H. Doane 

Miss Catherine Donnelly 

Mrs. Edward C. Donnelly 

Mrs. Hamilton P. Edwards 

Mrs. Samuel Eliot 

Mrs. Donald Falvey 

Mrs. Vincent L. Greene 

122 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Mrs. John W. Hallowell 
Mrs. Bartlett Harwood 
Mrs. C. Stephen Heard 
Mrs. Harold D. Hodgkinson 
Mrs. Russell Howell 
Mrs. John H. Johnson 
Mrs. Alfred Kidder, II 
Mrs. Louis E. Kirstein 
Mrs. William E. Ladd 
Miss Constance B. Learned 
Miss Elizabeth C. Leland 
Mrs. Francis B. Lothrop 
Mrs. Frederic W. Mattheis 
Miss Mary Meehan 
Mrs. George H. Monks 
Mrs. John W. Myers 
Mrs. Harris J. Nelson 
Mrs. William Brace Pratt 
Miss Dorothy Rackemann 
Mrs. William L. Shearer, III 
Miss Ida C. Smith 
Miss Patricia Spencer 
Mrs. Frank H. Stewart 
Mrs. Philip Stockton 
Miss Virginia Stone 
Mrs. William Sutton 
Mrs. Robert C. Terry 
Mrs. Philip H. Theopold 
Mrs. Richard H. Thompson 
Mrs. Samuel D. Warren 
Mrs. Richard P. Waters 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster 
Mrs. David A. Westcott 
Mrs. Alexander Wheeler 
Mrs. Nehemiah H. Whitman 
Mrs. H. Parker Whittington 
Mrs. Samuel H. Wolcott 
Mrs. Edgar N. Wrightington 

Honorary Members 
Mrs. Roger W. Cutler 
Mrs. Frederick S. Mead 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF WELFARE COMMITTEE 

1941 
Receipts 

Welfare Committee $4,450.29 

Avery Lectures 5,000.00 

Yankee Trading Post 3,960.00 

Campaign proceeds through Welfare Committee 898.50 

Gross Receipts $14,308.79 

WELFARE COMMITTEE 123 



Deduct Special Donations 

Avery Lectures proceeds for the following pur- 
poses: (in accordance with the recommenda- 
tion of the Committee and the approval of the 
Board of Managers) 

Support of Occupational Therapy for one 

year $1,800.00 

For an Autoclave 2,645.00 

Special Nursing 555.00 

Yankee Trading Post proceeds for the following 
purpose : (in accordance with the recommenda- 
tion of the Committee and the approval of the 
Board of Managers ) 

William E. Ladd Chair of Surgery 3,960.00 

Holiday Committee 90.00 

Expenses 1,400.52 

Balance towards current expenses 3,858.27 



$14,308.79 

MRS. JOHN E. LAWRENCE, 

Assistant Treasurer 



124 THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



Abbott, F. B 1915 

Adams, John D 1902 

Adams, John E 1941 

Adams, Wm. B 1920 

Adelman, Maurice 1922 

Alexander, Eben, Jr 1940 

Allen, Fred H., Jr 1941 

* Allison, Nathaniel 1901 

Ames, Frederick D 1934 

Amiral, Hiram H 1916 

Anderson, Arthur 1923 

Anderson, Randolph L. . . . 1926 
Anderson, Samuel A., Jr. . .1925 

* Andrews, Edward A 1896 

Andrews, Sumner C 1916 

Atsatt, Rodney F 1927 

Aufranc, Otto E 1938 

Austen, George 1937 

Ayer, J. B., Jr 1907 

Bacon, Joshua E 1927 

Bacon, William B 1941 

Bailey, Orville T 1935 

*Bailey, Walter C 1898 

*Baker, Frederick H 1892 

Baker, Horace M 1917 

*Baldwin, Herman T 1895 

Ball, John D 1923 

Barber, Carol Glenn 1921 

Barnes, Frederick W., Jr.. 1937 

Barr, Joseph S 1928 

Barrett, M. F 1903 

Bartlett, Daniel E 1905 

Bartlett, Fred A 1908 

Baty, James M 1929 

Beekel, W. Fred 1907 

Bell, Donald .1921 

Bell, John F 1942 

Bender, Norman 1921 

Benjamin, JamesD., U.S.N. 1914 

Bennett, Charles B 1923 

Berkley, Hugh K 1916 

Bigelow, Edward B 1907 

Binns, J. Frazier 1929 

Biorkman, Gustav 1918 

*Deceased 



43 Bay State Road, Boston, Mass. 

Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. 

20 Maple St., Springfield, Mass. 

209 Angel St., Providence, R. I. 

U. S. A. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

1201 Medical Arts Bldg., Houston, Tex. 
9 Walnut St., Worcester, Mass. 
122 East 76th St., New York, N. Y 
1023 Quarier St., Richmond, Va. 
2326 W. Grace St., Richmond, Va. 

636 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

1421 State St., Santa Barbara, Calif. 

U. S. A. 

U. S. A. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

1200 Main St., Dubuque, la. 
160 Riverway, Boston, Mass. 
Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. 



Lumberton, N. C. 

414 Spurgeon Bldg., Santa Ana, Calif. 
606 Hanna Bldg., Cleveland, O. 
Children'sResearchFounda'n, Cincinnati, O. 
U. S. A. 
231 Main St., Brockton, Mass. 

308 Beale St., Wollaston, Mass. 
1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 
7039 Superior Ave., Cleveland, O. 
Ojai, Calif. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 

Naval Air Station, San Diego, Calif. 
1122 University Ave., Berkeley, Calif. 
1136 West 6th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
9 Walnut St., Worcester, Mass. 
706 Church St., Nashville, Tenn. 
660 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y. 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



125 



Billig, Harvey F., Jr 1936 

Birdsong, McLemore 1941 

Blair, Montgomery 1929 

Blodgett, James B 1940 

Blodgett, William H 1939 

Bolowtow, Nathan A 1917 

Bost, Frederick C 1929 

Botsford, Thomas W 1937 

*Boutwell, Horace K 1905 

Bowditch, Henry 1 1902 

Boyd, Robert T 1939 

Breckenridge, William G. . 1941 
Bressler-Pettis, Chas. W. . . 1917 

Briggs, Maurice T 1917 

Brines, John K 1939 

Bromer, Ralph 1915 

Brooks, Glidden L 1939 

Brostrom, Frank 1929 

Brown, Charles L 1923 

*Brown, David R 1918 

Brown, F. Bert 1938 

Brown, John C, D.M.D. . . 1939 

Brown, John E., Jr 1933 

Brown, Lloyd T 1908 

Brown, Percy 1900 

Browne, Trevor S 1924 

*Bryant, Charles S 1899 

Bryant, Clarence E 1906 

Burpee, Benjamin P 1916 

Byers, Randolph K 1924 

Byrne, Harry V 1929 

Cahoun, John G 1928 

Calder, Harold G 1908 

Campbell, Charles M 1940 

Campbell, James B 1937 

Canada, Charles C 1934 

Canaday, John W 1934 

Carey, Benjamin W 1935 

Carpenter, George 1920 

Carson, Paul C 1921 

Carter, Marshall A 1935 

Catterson, L. F 1926 

Cave, Edwin 1927 

Chamberlain, John W 1935 

Chapin, William E 1926 



Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif. 
University Virginia Medical School, Char- 
lottesville, Va. 
2222 Q St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 
Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. 
2218 Iroquois Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
126 Waterman St., Providence, R. I. 
384 Post St., San Francisco, Calif. 
U. S. A. 



Iowa City, la. 

315 Pearl Ave., Peterborough, Ontario, Can. 

7 Lynn Shore Drive, Lynn, Mass. 
1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 
629 Pembroke Rd., Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Central Maine General Hospital, Lewiston, 

Me. 
3439 Prytania St., New Orleans, La. 
2401 North Broad St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

612 Drayton St., Savannah, Ga. 

U. S. A. 

270 East Town St., Columbus, O. 

372 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

Egypt, Mass. 

711 Professional Bldg., Phoenix, Ariz. 

101 Highland St., Hyde Park, Mass. 
814 Elm St., Manchester, N. H. 
319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
301 Essex St., Lawrence, Mass. 

Corback, Invernesshire, Scotland 

224 Thayer St., Providence, R. I. 

Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. 

U. S. A. 

2015 North Kenmore St., Arlington, Va. 

191 Glen St., Glenns Falls, N. Y. 

Lederele Laboratories, Pearl River, N. Y. 

1205 Behnie Dillon Bldg., Nashville, Tenn. 

401 North Emporia, Wichita, Kan. 

Box DD, Carmel, Calif. 

107'/ 2 High Ave., E., Oskaloosa, la. 

U. S. A. 

U. S. A. 

3103 West Franklin St., Richmond, Va. 



*Deceased 



126 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Chenoweth, Beach M., Jr.. 1941 

Chisholm, Tague C 1942 

Churney, Otto 1929 

Clarke, George W 1904 

Clarke, M. Melvin 1927 

Clement, David H 1939 

Clifford, Stewart 1929 

Cochrane, J. Joseph 1925 

Coe, Herbert E 1907 

Cogswell, William, Jr 1892 

Cole, Walter F 1920 

Connerley, Marion L 1940 

Cook, Robert J 1916 

Coonse, G. Kenneth 1927 

*Corson, Carl C 1936 

Cozen, Lewis 1938 

*Crandall, Arthur R 1896 

Crane, Chilton 1940 

Cravener, Edward K 1929 

Crawford, Henry B 1930 

*Creesy, Everett L 1900 

Crawford, Henry B 1930 

*Creesy, Everett L 1900 

Crothers, Bronson 1912 

Cudney, Ethan B 1925 

Cunningham, Allen 1915 

Curnen, Edward C, Jr 1938 

Cutler, Charles H 1939 

Daniels, George F 1923 

*Darrah, Rufus 1887 

Davidson, William D 1933 

David, S. D 1923 

Davis, Arthur G 1922 

Dawson, Clyde W 1938 

Deering, Charles F 1911 

Derby, Joseph C 1924 

♦Dexter, Smith 1936 

Diamond, Louis K 1929 

Dietrich, Henry F 1936 

Dillon, Victor M 1931 

Dimmler, Charles L., Jr. . . 1939 
Dingle, John H 1940 

Dinnerman, M., D.M.D. . . 1941 

Divers, Douglas 1924 

Dodd, J. E 1912 

Domser, Benjamin M 1911 



Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 

Zamboanga, P. I. 

Defiance, O. 

315 Alexander St., Rochester, N. Y. 

135 Linwood Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 

15 West Central St., Natick, Mass. 

830 Medical&Dental Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 

Capitol Bldg., Helena, Mont. 

101 North Elm St., Greensboro, N. C. 

U. S. N. 

85 Whitney Ave., New Haven, Conn. 

370 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

2007 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 

U. S. A. 

146 Barrett St., Schenectady, N. Y. 

35 Chestnut St., Rochester, N. Y. 

35 Chestnut St., Rochester, N. Y. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

527 West Iroquois Rd., Pontiac, Mich. 

76 Church St., Winchester, Mass. 

U. S. N. 

2000 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, Calif. 

129 East 69th St., New York, N. Y. 

810 East Powell Ave., Evansville, Ind. 

911 Medical Arts Bldg., Houston, Tex. 

716 Sassafras St., Erie, Pa. 

1374 Ida Ave., Columbus, O. 

38 Elm St., Danvers, Mass. 

20 Maple St., Springfield, Mass. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
415 North Camden, Beverly Hills, Calif. 
490 Post St., San Francisco, Calif. 
U. S. A. 

Thorndike Laboratory, Boston City Hos- 
pital, Boston, Mass. 
U. S. A. 

73 3d St., N.W., Pulaski, Va. 
259 Union Ave., Framingham, Mass. 
506 Prospect Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 



♦Deceased 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



127 



Doolittle, Leroy 1917 

Dresel, Rudolph L 1919 

Drissen, Edward 1931 

Dubois, Robert 1923 

Duckett, J. Warner 1929 

Dunn, C. H 1902 

Dwan, Paul F 1931 

Dye, Paul J 1926 

Dyer, Edward C 1942 

"Eastman, Alexander 1900 

*Eaton, Percival J 1885 

Eckles, Lucius E 1935 

Edmonds, Henry W 1941 

Eley, R. C 1929 

Ellis, Richard W. B 1929 

*Ely, T. W 1910 

Emerson, George E 1905 

Emerson, Paul 1915 

Emidy, Herman L 1926 

Eveleth, Charles W 1904 

Ewer, Edward G 1937 

Farber, Sidney 1928 

Fay, William E 1887 

Ferguson, Charles F 1937 

Ferguson, Edward V 1941 

Fisher, James T 1895 

Fisher, William H 1929 

Fiske, Eben W 1912 

*Fiske, William B 1885 

Fitch, Ralph R 1904 

Fitts, John B 1916 

Fitz, George W 1890 

*FitzSimmons, H. J 1910 

Flake, Carlyle G 1937 

"Fletcher, A. S 1909 

Fletcher, F. L 1928 

Flint, Carlton P 1898 

Flook, Samuel E 1939 

Floyd, Cleveland 1905 

Fort, F. L 1923 

Fortune, Clayton W 1930 

Foshee, Clyde H 1931 

Foster, Joseph B 1929 

Foster, Thomas 1919 

Fothergill, Leroy 1930 

Fowler, Charles B 1929 



908 Medical Arts Bldg., Duluth, Minn. 
490 Post St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Briton, S. D. 

122 East 76th St., New York, N. Y. 
4105 Live Oak St., Dallas, Tex. 

4509 Dupont, So., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Sewall Rd., Wolfeboro, N. H. 
U. S. A. 



715 Fillmore St., Topeka, Kan. 
Mass. General Hospital, Boston, Mass. 
U. S. N. 

Rearsby, Leicestershire, England 

52 Columbia St., South Weymouth, Mass. 
422 East 19th St., Cheyenne, Wyo. 
193 Gaskill St., Woonsocket, R. I. 
1 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y. 
181 Brookside Dr., Berkeley, Calif. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Melrose, Mass. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

1151 No. Madison Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

755 Salem St., Maiden, Mass. 

701 Westinghouse Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

277 Alexander St., Rochester, N. Y. 
917 West Franklin St., Richmond, Va. 
Peconic, L. I., N. Y. 

U. S. A. 

Milford, N. H. 

1129 Grand Ave., Dayton, O. 

246 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

1022 Park St., Jacksonville, Fla. 

716 Sassafras St., Erie, Pa. 

Citizens Bank Bldg., Madisonville, Ky. 

1028 Medical Arts Bldg., Houston, Tex. 

131 State St., Portland, Me. 

U. S. A. 

411 30th St., Oakland, Calif. 



"Deceased 



128 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Franke, Winthrop 1 1941 

Frawley, W. T 1910 

Frazee, John W 1930 

Freeman, Don W 1938 

*Fregeau, Wheaton 1933 

Freiburg, Joseph A 1927 

Friedman, Eli 1918 

Fuldner, Russell V 1940 

*Gage, Homer 1885 

Gallo, James E 1925 

Gallup, Henry E 1928 

Gamble, James L 1912 

Ganz, Robert N 1927 

Gates, R. E 1908 

(Not in practice) 

Gear, Patrick 1919 

George, A. W 1904 

Giddings, Paul D 1937 

Gill, MacLean 1935 

Gillespie, Elmer H 1930 

Gillespie, Norman 1917 

Glover, Donald M 1921 

Goeringer, C. Fred 1937 

Goldloom, Alton 1917 

Goldman, Ahbrum 1918 

Goldthwaite, Joel E 1888 

Goodale, Robert L 1924 

Goodwin, Edward S 1928 

Gordon, John K 1921 

Graham, W. T 1910 

Green, Hyman 1916 

Green, William T 1931 

*Greene, D. Crosby, Jr. . . . 1898 

Griffin, Charles H 1923 

Griffith, Jesse B 1919 

Gross, Harold G 1890 

Gross, Herman W 1896 

Gross, Robert 1932 

Grover, Joseph 1 1913 

Grub, Wilson 1940 

Grulee, Clifford, Jr 1940 

Guest, George M 1926 

Guy, Percy F 1926 

Haig, Ray T 1924 

Haight, Harry W 1911 

*Hall, Herbert J 1894 



300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

184 North St., Pittsfield, Mass. 

U. S. A. 

112 North Burnett Ave., Denison, Tex. 

707 Race St., Cincinnati, O. 

416 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Conn. 



Alvero Bldg., Herkimer, N. Y. 
1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 
300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
19 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 
144 Walnut St., East Dedham, Mass. 

188 Chestnut St., Holyoke, Mass. 

43 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 

25 Gage St., Augusta, Me. 

U. S. A. 

1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 

632 Columbia Rd., Dorchester, Mass. 

10515 Carnegie Ave., Cleveland, O. 

U. S. A. 

1543 Crescent St., Montreal, Que. 

121 East 60th St., New York, N. Y. 

372 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

258 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

304 State St., Albany, N. Y. 

1538 Sherbrooke St., West Montreal, Que. 

116 East Franklin St., Richmond, Va. 

483 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

404 County St., New Bedford, Mass. 
Willinsburg, Pa. 
Eureka, Calif. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

281 Ashmont At., Dorchester, Mass. 

1011 North Charles St., Baltimore, Md. 

U. S. A. 

Cincinnati Children's Hosp., Cincinnati, O. 

618 2d Ave., Seattle, Wash. 

1026 Medico Dental Bldg., Sacramento, Cal. 
Highland Park, N. J. 



*Deceased 

FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



129 



Hall, Robert G 1910 

Hamlin, Hannibal 1941 

Hand, Delbert W 1935 

Hanflig, Samuel 1931 

Hansell, W. Whitfield 1917 

Harbin, Maxwell 1923 

Harkey, J. Mace 1940 

Harral, Pinckney 1935 

Harper, Edwin A 1934 

Harris, Albert H 1931 

Harris, Herbert E 1936 

Harris, Jerome S 1936 

Hartman, Frederick B. . . . 1935 

Harvery, Campbell 1921 

Hass, George 1931 

Hassman, David M 1915 

*Haven, George 1882 

Helmick, Arthur G 1913 

Henry, Myron 1922 

Herrick, Theodore P 1920 

Hertig, A. T 1932 

Heyl, Henry L 1935 

Hibben, F. H 1914 

*Higgins, Frank A 1891 

Hight, Donald 1935 

Hightower, Robert A 1936 

Hildebrand, Edward E 1941 

Hill, Allen M 1939 

Hill, A. Morgan 1928 

Hill, John M 1941 

Hill, Lewis W 1915 

Hitchcock, Harold H 1922 

Ho, Wayne Y. H 1941 

Hockwalt, Wm. Richard. .1929 

Hodgen, John T 1915 

Hodges, Richard G 1938 

*Hogarth, Walter P 1921 

Hoover, Harold R 1940 

Hopkins, Frank Read. . . . 1930 

Horn, Carl E 1941 

Horner, Albert A 1913 

Hosley, Walter A 1906 

*Howard, A. A 1910 

Howard, Philip 1927 

Howard, Rutledge W 1939 

Howe, Walter C 1897 



812 S. W. Washington St., Portland, Ore. 

U. S. N. 

450 Sutter St., San Francisco, Calif. 

371 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

901 Surety Bldg., Des Moines, la. 

10515 Carnegie Ave., Cleveland, O. 

610 Market Ave., North Canton, O. 

5920 Julian Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

301 Rivermont Ave., Lynchburg, Va. 

Loudonville, N. Y. 

219 Waterman St., Providence, R. I. 

Duke University, Durham, N. C. 

241 North Main St., Liberty, N. Y. 

Orchard Lake, Mich. 

Cornell Medical School, New York, N. Y. 

1738 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 

78 South Fifth St., Columbus, O. 
401 Medical Arts Bldg., Minneapolis, Minn. 
10515 Carnegie Ave., Cleveland, O. 
Boston Lying-in Hospital, Boston, Mass. 
U. S. A. 

Westfield State Sanatorium, Westfield, 
Mass. 

Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. 
2651 16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 
300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
U. S. A. 

1810 Wealthy St., S.E., Grand Rapids, Mic 
35 Alban St., Dorchester, Mass. 
319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
1624 Franklin St., Oakland, Calif. 
Children's Hospital Society, 4614 Sunset 

Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 
560 Fidelity Bldg., Dayton, O. 
1810 Wealthy St., S.E., Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Babies Hospital, New York, N. Y. 

U. S. N. 

1112 Church St., Lynchburg, Va. 
241 East Santa Clara, San Jose, Calif. 
319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
46 Waban Ave., Waban, Mass. 

Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich. 
Putchogue, Long Island, N. Y. 



"Deceased 



130 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Howell, William W 1899 

Hubbard, Elliot, Jr 1918 

Hubbard, John P 1931 

Huddleston, John 1899 

Hudson, Henry W., Jr.. . . 1927 

Hugenberger, Paul W 1934 

Hughes, Grey C 1936 

Hughes, Harry C 1937 

Humphreys, Storer P 1936 

Hunt, Fred C 1919 

*Hunting, Nathaniel S 1886 

Huntington, Frederick. . . .1926 

Hurd, Arthur H 1936 

Huston, Lewis L 1937 

Hyatt, Gilbert T 1933 

Ilfeld, Frederic W 1936 

Jackson, George H 1918 

Jacobus, Lawrence 1928 

Jeans, Philip 1910 

Jenks, Harrison D 1893 

Jennings, Charles G 1942 

Jennings, Robert E 1934 

Jennings, Percy H., Jr. . . . 1937 

Johann, A. E 1910 

Johnson, Erick St. John . . . 1904 

Johnson, Harold N 1937 

Johnston, Joseph A 1926 

Jones, Frank S 1932 

Jones, Harold W 1901 

Jones, J. Lawrence 1921 

Joplin, Robert J 1934 

Judy, J. A 1926 

Jump, Ellis B., D.M.D 1938 

Karp, Meier G 1935 

Keane, Clarence 1905 

Keever, Henry F 1909 

Kendrick, James 1 1932 

Kennard, John H. 1938 

Key, John A 1920 

Key, William A 1928 

King, Donald 1917 

King, Edward 1917 

♦King, James M 1926 

*Knowles, W. F 1882 

Koplik, Louis 1931 



330 Dartmouth St., Boston, Mass. 
29 Highland St., Cambridge, Mass. 
319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

U. S. N. 

234 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

Shackleford Hospital, Martinsville, Va. 

Axton, Va. 

3801 University St., Montreal, Canada 

34 Fenn St., Pittsfield, Mass. 

333 Quincy Ave., Scranton, Pa. 
595 East Colorado St., Pasadena, Calif. 
117 12th St., N.E., Cedar Rapids, la. 
151 Rock St., Fall River, Mass. 

1930 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 

840 Forest Ave., Evanston, 111. 
2940 Summit St., Oakland, Calif. 
Children's Hospital, Iowa City, la. 

The Children's Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

143 Park St., East Orange, N. J. 

Cold Spring Harbor, L. I., N. Y. 

685 Harwood Dr., Des Moines, la. 

18 Fallen St., Cambridge, Mass. 

106 2d St., Cloverdale, Montgomery, Ala. 

1937 Boston Blvd., Detroit, Mich. 

179 Allyn St., Hartford, Conn. 

7610 17th St., Washington, D. C. 

401 Argyle Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 

U. S. N. 

414 Harris Bldg., Dayton, O. 

University of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 

234 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

Silverton, Ore. 

69 Maple Rd., Auburndale, Mass. 

2020 East 93d St., Cleveland, O. 

967 Elm St., Manchester, N. H. 

Wash. Univ. Med. School, St. Louis, Mo. 

23 2d Ave., San Mateo, Calif. 

1101 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

Hay ward Bldg., Asheville, N. C. 



311 East 72d St., New York, N. Y. 



^Deceased 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



131 



Krakower, Cecil A 1936 

Kuhns, JohnG 1927 

Kyle, Bernard 1921 

Lanman, Thomas H 1920 

*Larned, F. J 1914 

Larson, Carol B 1937 

*Legg, Arthur T 1900 

Legg, Robert L., D.M.D.. 1940 

Legge, Robert F 1936 

Levine, S. Z 1923 

Linde, Frederick G 1925 

*Lindemann, E. E 1911 

Logan, George B 1937 

Lonergan, Robert C 1925 

Lord, Robert M 1920 

Low, Harry C 1896 

Low, Merritt B 1934 

Lowrey, John J 1941 

Lucas, William P 1906 

Luther, Elliott H 1926 

MacCollum, Donald W. . . 1932 

McDermott, Leo J 1939 

McDonald, Francis Chas.1930 

McElroy, William D 1933 

McGoverney, Richard B...1930 

McGuire, Joseph H 1917 

McKeever, Francis M 1930 

McKhann, Charles F 1923 

McLaughlin, William 1931 

McNeil, Donald 1930 

Mahoney, P. J 1930 

*Manning, J. B 1908 

Maraldi, Carl F 1927 

Marion, J. W. J 1911 

Marr, Myron W 1908 

Martin, James W 1924 

Marting, Frank L 1937 

Matchet, Foster 1935 

Mathews, Samuel 1928 

Matson, Donald D 1940 

Maxwell, Cyrus 1928 

May, Charles D 1938 

Meade, T. Stanley 1934 

Meeker, Cornelius S 1941 

Merriam, Joseph C 1925 

Metzer, Butler 1897 



Dept. Tropical Medicine, San Juan, P. R. 
372 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 
1011 Church St., Lynchburg, Va. 

U. S. A. 

264 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

16th Medical Reg., Fort Devens, Mass. 
3135 Webster St., Oakland, Calif. 
525 East 68th St., New York, N. Y. 
384 Post St., San Francisco, Calif. 

503 Ninth Ave., S. W., Rochester, Minn. 

636 Church St., Evanston, 111. 

122 Waterman St., Providence, R. I. 

Hanover, Mass. 

31 Federal St., Greenfield, Mass. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 

490 Post St., San Francisco, Calif. 

State Sanatorium, Westfield, Mass. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

151 Vaughan St., Portland, Me. 

203 Park St., Stoneham, Mass. 

318 St. Louis Ave., Youngstown, O. 

1515 State St., Santa Barbara, Calif. 

1719 Pacific Ave., Dallas, Tex. 

680 South Bronson Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

University Hospital, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

500 Penn Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

1127 11th St., Sacramento, Calif. 

U. S. N. 

276 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Linden Rd., Pinehurst, N. C. 

107 South 17th St., Omaha, Neb. 

1476 Glenwood Blvd., Schenectady, N. Y. 

Shriners' Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 

617 South Olive St., Los Angles, Calif. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

U. S. A. 

U. S. A. 

913 Floyd Ave., Richmond, Va. 

866 West College Ave., Jacksonville, 111. 

198 Union Ave., Framingham, Mass. 

41 Ocean St., Lynn, Mass. 



"Deceased 



132 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Mewburn, F. H. H 1922 

Meyers, Robert S 1938 

Miller, H. L 1918 

♦Miller, Harold F 1929 

Miller, J. Fleek 1934 

Miller, Ralph T 1927 

*Milleken, Ralph A 1926 

Mindlin, Roland D 1940 

Miner, Henry R 1920 

Moore, Beveridge H 1918 

Moore, Chester B 1912 

Moore, George C 1905 

Moore, John M 1939 

Moore, Stephen H 1938 

Morris, Harry D 1937 

Morrissey, E. James 1935 

Morrison, Gordon 1941 

Morse, William R 1916 

Moulton, Robert T 1937 

Mueller, Harry L 1937 

Mumford, Eugene B 1905 

Muro, Felipe 1920 

Murphy, John P 1933 

Myers, A. E 1913 

Myers, Ernest E 1932 

Myers, Samuel W 1902 

Naive, Jesse B 1921 

Nathan, Louis 1930 

Neff, Richard S 1939 

Nelson, Richard L 1932 

Newsam, A. Roland 1922 

Nichols, Wallace J 1933 

♦Nichols, E. H 1889 

Nitchman, Donald E 1940 

Norton, Paul L 1934 

Norton, Rupert 1891 

Nutter, John A 1906 

Ober, Frank R 1914 

O'Brien, Robert M 1940 

O'Connor, Dennis 1926 

O'Meara, John W 1919 

O'Neil, Frank C 1937 

Osgood, Rudolph 1930 

Otis, Henry S 1882 

Overlander, Charles L 1906 



416 McLeod Bldg. , Edmonton, Alberta, Can. 
Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 
163 High St., Taunton, Mass. 

482 Hudson Ave., Newark, O. 
89 Main St., Ware, Mass. 

Children's Hospital, Detroit, Mich. 

108 West 17th St., Falls City, Neb. 

8 South Michigan Blvd,. Chicago, 111. 

384 Post St., San Francisco, Calif. 

475 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

384 Post St., San Francisco, Calif. 

3328 Daniel St., Dallas, Tex. 

700 S. Kings Highway Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 

329 South Front St., Milton, Pa. 

205 3d Ave., San Mateo, Calif. 

Chengtu, China 

28l/ 2 Broad St., Salem St., Mass. 

31 Church St., Winchester, Mass. 

320 North Meridian St., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Farmington, Mich. 

634 North Grand Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 

321 East 42d St., New York, N. Y. 
84 Hutchins St., Roxbury, Mass. 

Beverly Hills Sanatorium, Knoxville, Tenn. 

68 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 

U. S. A. 

1300 8th St., Wichita Falls, Tex. 

1644 Broad St., Providence, R. I. 

102 Forest St., Medford, Mass. 

706 Union St., Schenectady, N. Y. 
264 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

1414 Drummond St., Montreal, Canada 

234 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 
3838 Flad Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 
158 Whitney Ave., New Haven, Conn. 
390 Main St., Worcester, Mass. 
216 South Main St., Middletown, O. 
Truesdale Hosp., Fall River, Mass. 

443 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 



^Deceased 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



133 



Packard, Robert G 1915 

Page, Calvin G 1893 

Painter, Charles F 1893 

Palfrey, F. W 1903 

Parker, Willard S 1912 

Parnall, Edward 1932 

Patchen, Paul J 1931 

Patrick, William F 1917 

Patterson, Robert L 1934 

*Peckham, Frank E 1888 

Pelkan, KarlF 1925 

*Pegram, John C, Jr 1896 

Percy, Karlton G 1913 

*Perkins, John W 1884 

Perry Sherman 1909 

Peters, William C 1904 

Phelps, Winthrop M 1924 

Pickard, Nicholas S 1941 

Pierce, F. Richard 1935 

Pike, Maurice 1928 

Pinckny, F. H 1914 

Pinkerton, Henry 1916 

Pitkin, Horace C 1927 

Placek, Joseph C 1933 

Pohl, John F 1933 

Pokorny, Norman A 1933 

Politzer, Richard M 1926 

Porter, Arnold 1941 

"Porter, Donald W 1914 

"Porter, Donald W 1914 

Porter, Robert B 1901 

Pratt, Henry 1933 

Prescott, H. D. (Retired). 1903 
Pyle, Henry D 1929 

Radcliffe, Ernest J 1925 

Ramsay, Robert E 1918 

Ramsey, W. S 1914 

Rawlings, Junius Mott. . . 1929 

Record, Eugene E 1929 

Rector, John M 1933 

Rector, Lewis E 1939 

Reed, Carson R 1935 

Reese, C. A 1907 

Regan, John W 1937 

Register, John F 1935 

Reidy, John A., Jr 1938 



711 Marion St., Denver, Col. 

129 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

520 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

25 Lime St., Boston, Mass. 

270 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

247 Culver Rd., Rochester, N. Y. 

8480 Commercial Ave., Chicago, 111. 

1020 S.W.Taylor St., Portland, Que. 

135 East 65th St., New York, N. Y. 

241 East Santa Clara St., San Jose, Calif. 

520 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

22 Walnut St., Winchester, Mass. 

45 State St., Bangor, Me. 

3038 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 

1400 Professional Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 

U. S. A. 

179 Allyn St., Hartford, Conn. 

186 South St., Morristown, N. J. 

St. Louis University School of Medicine, 

St. Louis, Mo. 
909 Hyde St., San Francisco, Calif. 
1515 Carnegie Ave., Cleveland O. 
1945 Medical Arts Bldg. , Minneapolis, Minn. 
20 Maple St., Springfield, Mass. 
103 East North St., Greenville, S. C. 
Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 



North Easton, Mass. 

U. S. A. 

26 Grove St., New Bedford, Mass. 

105 East Jefferson Blvd., South Bend, Ind. 

67 Butterfield Ter., Amherst, Mass. 

65 North Madison Ave., Pasadena, Calif. 

407 East Kingsley St., Ann Arbor, Mich. 

116 Mills St., El Paso, Tex. 

U. S. A. 

2000 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, Calif. 

U. S. N. 

1560 Line Ave., Shreveport, La. 

Beaumont du Perigord, Dordogne, France 

South Carolina Med. Col., Charleston, S. C. 

101 North Elm St., Greensboro, N. C. 

372 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 



"Deceased 



134 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Rew, Willard B 1934 

Rhinelander, Frederic W. . 1939 
Rizer, Dean K 1939 

*Robb, William A 1931 

Robbins, Fred C 1942 

Roberts, Madison Hines. . 1921 

*Roberts, Sumner 1929 

Roberts, Wyatt 1961 

Robertson, L. B 1913 

Rogers, William 1923 

Ross, Alan S 1931 

Ross, Fred E 1912 

Ross, Frederick P 1941 

Ross, Ralph A 1939 

Rowe, Carter R 1938 

♦Rowland, Russell S 1904 

Rowley, Howard F. ..... . 1923 

Rubin, Gabriel J 1926 

Rue, Homer A 1920 

Rumsey, William L 1941 

Rutherford, Frederick H.. 1937 
Ryerson, Edwin W 1897 

*Sadler, Roy A 1909 

Saeger, Ernest T 1919 

Sander, John F 1926 

Sandmeyer, John A 1938 

Sanford, Charles H 1913 

Schlesinger, W. F 1927 

Schott, Harry J 1921 

Schulz, Reuben 1929 

Schultz, Robert V 1931 

Schwartz, Eugene 1934 

Schwartz, R. Plato 1920 

Scudder, Charles 1886 

Seabold, William W 1935 

Seelye, Walter B 1929 

Segar, Louis 1914 

Seeleseth, Iver F 1920 

Selva, Julio 1892 

Sever, James W 1901 

Shaffner, Louis deS 1942 

Shannon, James 1933 

Shannon, Paul W 1934 

Sheldon, Walter S 1939 

Sherwood, David W 1929 

Shortell, Joseph 1918 

Shugarman, Wilson G 1940 



507 Larson Bldg., Yakima, Wash. 
Gilbert Rd., Meadowbrook, Pa. 
2301 Oliver Ave., Minneapolis, Minn. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
104 Ponce de Leon Ave., Atlanta, Ga. 

3838 9th St., Birmingham, Ala. 

University of Chicago, 111. 

264 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

1414 Drummond St., Montreal, Can. 

501 West Ninth St., Erie, Pa. 

U. S. A. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

1108 Princess Ann St., Fredericksburg, Va. 

176 South Goodman St., Rochester, N. Y. 

520 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

625 South Lorena St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

5 Sherman Ave., Bronxville, N. Y. 

417 East Union St., Seattle, Wash. 

232 East Walton P., Chicago, 111. 



70 Oldham Rd., West Newton, Mass. 

320 Townsend St., Lansing, Mich. 
Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 
923 Walton Ave., New York, N. Y. 
Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

727 West 7th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Whittier Rd., Wellesley, Mass. 

U. S. A. 

200 East Pershing St., Springfield, Mo. 

260 Crittendon Blvd., Rochester, N. Y. 

Longwood Towers, Brookline, Mass. 

5012 Edmondson Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

1305 4th Ave., Seattle, Wash. 

23 East Ohio St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

621 West Lake St., Minneapolis, Minn. 

321 Dartmouth St., Boston, Mass. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 

1414 Drummond St., Montreal, Can. 

1927 1st Ave., Birmingham, Ala. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 

U. S. N. 

270 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

(See Grub) 



^Deceased 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



135 



Schwachman, Harry 1930 

Simon, Royal 1931 

Skinner, Marcus 1913 

Smith, Clement A 1931 

Smith, Edward T 1936 

Smith, F. R 1921 

Smith, L. D 1924 

Smith, Richard M 1909 

Smyth, Francis Scott 1923 

Snedeker, Lendon 1932 

Soule, Herbert C, Jr 1922 

*Soutter, Robert 1898 

Spalding, Roger 1903 

Spaulding, Charles L 1899 

Spencer, Harvey 1928 

*Spencer, J. B 1908 

Spicer, Charles M 1915 

Spring, C. W 1883 

Stanton, James T 1938 

Staples, O. Sherwin 1938 

Starbuck, George W 1941 

Steinberg, Alfred 1920 

Stetson, Frank E 1897 

Stevenson, Edward 1927 

Stewart, Steele F 1920 

Stickney, Edwin P 1891 

*Stickney, William 1906 

Stiefel, D. M 1924 

Stoeffler, Walter 1928 

*Storey, Carroll L 1916 

Storey, Thomas A 1905 

Stratford, Eldredge W. . . . 1931 

Strayer, Luther B 1939 

Sturdevant, Charles L. . . . 1941 

Swan, Henry 1941 

Sweet, Lewis K 1931 

Swenson, Orvar 1940 

Sylvester, Philip H 1907 

Talbot, Fritz B 1905 

Talbot, Nathan B 1938 

Tanner, Dean W 1938 

Tefft, Richard C 1922 

Thompson, Milton S., Jr.. 1935 

Thompson, Vernon P 1926 

Thornton, Andrew 1919 

Thurber, D. Packard 1918 



416 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 
515 Oakland Ave., Williamsport, Pa. 
Marcus Skinner Clinic, Selma, Ala. 
300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
1228 Medical Arts Bldg., Houston, Tex. 

107 East 67th St., New York, N. Y. 
2454 West Kilborn Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 
66 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

3d St. & Parnassus Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 
66 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 
16 North Goodman St., Rochester, N. Y. 

Duxbury, Mass. 

79 Hundreds Rd., Wellesley, Mass. 

1106 Republic Bldg., Denver, Colo. 

1706 Chester Ave., Baker sfield, Calif. 

262 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

U. S. A. 

4214 16th St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 

South Dartmouth, Mass. 

108 South Vine St., North Platte, Kans. 
3780 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 
58 Pleasant St., Arlington, Mass. 

1553 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
5215 Pleasant Run Pkwy, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Stanford University, San Francisco, Calif. 
303 Medical Arts Bldg., Portland, Ore. 
935 Main St., Bridgeport, Conn. 
300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
Gallanger Hospital, 19 St. and Mass. Ave., 

Washington, D. C. 
Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 
25 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 

270 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Mass. General Hosp., Boston, Mass. 

U. S. A. 

264 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

31 Deering St., Portland, Me. 

2007 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 

2201 Fourth Ave., San Diego, Calif. 

417 South Hill St., Los Angeles, Calif. 



^Deceased 



136 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Thurston, Donald L 1941 4 Oakleigh Lane, Clayton, Va. 

Tobin, William J 1940 Fort Benning, Ga. 

Tomkies, James S 1910 5831 Margerita St., Dallas, Tex. 

Treanor, John P., Jr 1925 1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 

Tso, Ernest 1919 c-o American Mission, Ichann, China 

Tucker, James 1929 116 East Franklin St., Richmond, Va. 

Troxler, Robert T 1941 Mass. General Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

Tucker, J. F 1883 

Turner, Arthur R 1929 5744 Drexel Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Turtle, William J 1936 66 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Tweddell, Henry J 1940 Woonsocket Hospital, Woonsocket, R. I. 

Ulrich, Joseph M 1920 193 West Market St., Akron, O. 

Van Meter, Agram L 1915 427 Bank of America Bldg., Stockton, Calif. 

Van Ornum, Earl N 1928 13780 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Vincent, Beth 1903 925 Boylston, St. Boston, Mass. 

Virkler, Stanley, D.M.D.. 1935 572 Washington St., Wellesley, Mass. 

Vogel, Harold T 1926 3420 86th St., Jackson Hts., L. I., N. Y. 

Wachter, Harry E 1936 203 Beaumont Medical Bldg., St. Louis, Mo. 

Wallace, William 1942 U. S. A. 

Walthal, Damon 1916 315 Alameda Rd., Kansas City, Mo. 

Walker, John H 1933 1620 Oklahoma Ave., Guthrie, Okla. 

*Warren, Henry S 1899 

Washburn, Alfred 1924 1950 Forest Parkway, Denver, Colo. 

Washburn, Frederic A. . . . 1894 190 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 

Watson, Richard G 1924 1624 Franklin St., Oakland, Calif. 

Webster, Fred P 1903 10 Congress Sq., Portland, Me. 

Weigel, Edgar W 1927 970 Park Ave., Elizabeth, N. J. 

Weigele, Carl E 1923 25 Gifford Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 

Weiler, Howard G 1930 40 14th St., Wheeling, W. Va. 

Weir, Dwight 1932 53 North Mulberry St., Mansfield, O. 

Wheeler, Warren E 1937 Wayne Medical School, Detroit, Mich. 

White, Robert S 1939 U. S. A. 

Whitford, Warren 1930 Windsor Locks, Conn. 

Whittemore, Frank S 1890 

Wilcox, John C 1936 281 South Thomas St., Pomona, Calif. 

Wilens, Gustav 1926 40 Main St., Torrington, Conn. 

Williams, McChord 1938 Charlotte, N. C. 

Wilson, Edward H. 1923 395 East Broad St., Columbus, O. 

Wilson, Franklin D 1919 5352 Studeley Ave., Norfolk, Va. 

Wilson, James L 1929 Wayne Medical School, Detroit, Mich. 

Wilson, James 1920 216 West 137th St., New York, N. Y. 

*Wilson, Louis T 1902 

Wing, Wilson M 1939 Roosevelt Hospital, New York, N. Y. 

Woo, Lan Sing 1919 St. Luke's Hospital, Shanghai, China 

Wood, Benjamin E 1907 Canton, Mass. 



"Deceased 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



137 



Woodberry, H. S 1914 

Woodbury, William P 1906 

Wooley, Paul V., Jr 1938 

Worden, Ernest M 1941 

Work, Henry M 1939 

Wormelle, Charles B 1901 

Wylie, Eugene C 1894 

Wyman, Edwin T 1912 

Wysor, Frank L 1916 

* Young, Ernest B 1895 

Young, J. H 1909 

Zuelzer, Wolfgang 1938 



Boem Becher Hospital, University of Ore- 
gon, Medical School, Portland, Ore. 
4940 Coronet St., Montreal, Can. 
Children's Hospital, Buffalo, N. Y. 
75 Gardner St., Allston, Mass. 
556 Washington St., Dorchester, Mass. 
319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
501 Ridgeway St., Clifton Forge, Va. 



66 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, 
Mich. 



•"Deceased 



138 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

300 LONGWOOD AVENUE, BOSTON 



NOT OPEN TO PERSONS ABLE TO PAY A DOCTOR'S FEE 
AGE LIMIT— 12 YEARS 

Medical (By appointment) — Every Morning — Tel.: Aspinwall 5930 

Medical Clinic Branches (By Appointment from Medical Clinic Only) 

Medical-Neurological Wed. and Thurs., 9.00 a.m. 

Eczema Thursday, 9.00 a.m. 

Luetic Monday, 2.00 p.m. 

Diabetic Monday, 2.00 p.m. 

Boston Lying-in Discharged Baby Clinic Wednesday, 2.00 p.m. 

Children's Hospital Medical Discharge Clinic. . . Wednesday, 2.00 p.m. 

Infant's Hospital Discharge Clinic Wednesday, 2.00 p.m. 

Rheumatic Fever Clinic Thursday, 2.00 P.M. 

Heart Thursday, 2.00 P.M. 

Anaphylaxis Clinic Tues. and Fri., 2.00 p.m. 

Muscle Training Clinic (Bader Bldg.) Mon., Wed., Fri., 2.00 p.m. 

New Cases — Friday, 2.00 p.m. 

SURGICAL— Every Morning— 8.30 to 10.00 a.m. 

Carbon Dioxide Treatment Friday, 10.45 a.m. 

Surgical-Neurological (By Appointment) Wednesday, 8.30 a.m. 

Plastic-Surgery Friday, 8.30 a.m. 

Ear, Nose, Throat — Tuesday and Thursday, 8.30 to 10.00 a.m. 
(By Appointment) 

Orthopedic — Every Morning — 8.30 to 10.00 a.m. 

Arthritis Clinic — Alternate Thursdays at 2.00 p.m. 
(By Appointment) 

Infantile Paralysis (Bader Bldg.) — Tues., Thurs., Fri., 8.30 to 10.00 a.m. 

Physiotherapy (Bader Bldg. ) 

Scoliosis-Posture — Tues., and Thurs., 2.00 to 3.30 p.m. — Sat., 8.30 a.m. 
Med., Surg., Orth. Physiotherapy — Mon., Wed., Fri., 8.30 to 10.00 a.m. 
Light Therapy — Mon., Wed., Fri. By appointment from clinics only. 

New Cases — Monday, 9.00 a.m. 
Exercises — Pool — By appointment only. 

Orthodontia — Wednesday, 9.00 a.m. — For Post-operative cases. 
By Appointment only. 

No Clinics on Sundays or Holidays 



Tel.: ASPinwall 5930